Home > Tag Archives: Politics

Tag Archives: Politics

bloomingOUT – July 2, 2015

Play

Join hosts Ryne Shadday and Jeff Poling as they talk with IU Mauer School of Law Professor and Huffington Post contributor Steve Sanders. You’ll also hear some of the latest LGBTQ+ headlines and events in and around Bloomington.

We also introduced our new theme music for the show, provided by Aaron Gage. Find more of Aaron’s work at aarongagemusic.com

Hosts – Ryne Shadday, Jeff Poling
Executive Producer – Joe Crawford
Producer and Engineer – Olivia Davidson
Social Media Coordinator – Megan McCullough

Voices In The Street – The Two Bloomingtons: Weighing the Pros and Cons of the Student Exodus

Play

Enough time has passed that it truly feels as though the IU student body population has dissipated significantly.  IU students bring a great deal of economic stimulus to Bloomington, but no one can dispute the relative calm that befalls our beloved city when summer gets into full swing.  Voices in the street hit the streets to ask your friends and neighbors which do they prefer:  Bloomington in the summer, or Bloomington in the school year.

A Blue Dot In a Sea of Red, Bloomington’s Liberal Attitudes Compared to the Rest of the State

Play

Bloomington, and especially Indiana University, is often referred to — politically speaking — as a blue dot in a sea of red. A strong majority of voters here favor Democrats, in stark contrast to the rest of Indiana. Conservative media often accuse of universities such as IU of indoctrinating students to favor liberal causes. WFHB correspondent Kara Tullman  wanted to know how local youth, who often move here from conservative small towns, adopt viewpoints and values that differ than the majority of those in their hometowns. She brings us that story for today’s WFHB community report.

Daily Local News – June 4th, 2015

Play

This morning Glenda Ritz announced her candidacy for the 2016 Democratic nomination for Indiana governor; More than fifty people crowded into a room at Nick’s English Hut today to discuss what some downtown businesspeople have referred to as bums; The Bloomington City Council unanimously approved new financial controls for the Bloomington Redevelopment Commission last night; Monroe Lake will have its annual Youth Fishing Derby from 8-10 am on Saturday.

FEATURE
Bloomington, and especially Indiana University, is often referred to — politically speaking — as a blue dot in a sea of red. A strong majority of voters here favor Democrats, in stark contrast to the rest of Indiana. Conservative media often accuse of universities such as IU of indoctrinating students to favor liberal causes. WFHB
correspondent Kara Tullman wanted to know how local youth, who often move here from conservative small towns, adopt viewpoints and values that differ than the majority of those in their hometowns. She brings us that story for today’s WFHB community report.

VOICES IN THE STREET
The Two Bloomingtons: Weighing the pros and cons of the student exodus.

CREDITS
Anchors: Scott Weddle, Carolyn VandeWeile
Today’s headlines were written by Joe Crawford, Jordan Guskey and Kara Tullman
Along with David Murphy for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Kara Tullman
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer today is Jose Rodriguez
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.

Interchange – What’s the Matter with Voting?

Play

Tonight’s show, “What’s the Matter with Voting,” will focus on some of the questions that surround the ways citizens think about what voting means, why it matters, or doesn’t, and the ways in which local elections fit inside national and state narratives of the electoral process.

Joining host Doug Storm are Marjorie Hershey and Joe Crawford.

Marjorie Hershey is a professor of political science at Indiana University where her research and teaching interests focus on political parties, campaigns, and elections. With regard to research, she continues to examine the process by which political activists and journalists construct explanations for election results.

Joe Crawford is the News Director at WFHB.

MUSIC
“Politics” by The Thompson Twins
“Ball of Confusion” by Love and Rockets

Credits
Host and Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Policing Race in America: Ferguson, Missouri

On tonight’s program, Policing Race in America, we discuss the way racial minorities are denigrated and devalued through institutional violence using the August 9 police murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri as an example that is all too common in the U.S.

Darren Wilson, the officer who killed Brown, is a resident of Crestwood, MO which is 94% White and under 2% Black, working in a Ferguson Police department (whose racial makeup is actually nearly that of the suburb of Crestwood) which polices a community that is 67% Black and 29% White (according to Wikipedia).

Joining host Doug Storm for this discussion are Jeannine Bell, an expert on police behavior and hate crime at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Valerie Grim, professor and chair of the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies.

Credits:
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Federal Focus Luncheon with Evan Bayh

Play

On April 14th an event was held to bring the public up to speed on events and trends in Washington D.C. The Bloomington Chamber of Commerce organized this episode of a reoccurring event called a Federal Focus Luncheon. This “Federal Focus Luncheon” featured many speakers, but former Indiana Governor and U.S. Senator Evan Bayh took the stage for most of the event. Bayh centered on his experience in the U.S. senate and the way federal trends will affect local politics. The event was recorded on location at President’s Hall on IU’s campus, by Community Access Television Services, for Standing Room Only on WFHB.

Latest on Indiana’s HJR-3 Amendment

Play

A second reading of House Joint Resolution 3 on the Senate floor today was without incident. If the Senate adopts the resolution on its third reading next Monday, it will reconcile with the amended version that came out of the House, and provide that only marriage between one man and one woman shall be valid or recognized as a marriage in Indiana.

This matches current Indiana law, which also states that marriage is only legally recognized in heterosexual couples, but the proposed constitutional amendment would be a much more permanent statement forbidding gay marriage in Indiana.

The second reading of a proposed bill or resolution is the point when amendments can be made, and it was uncertain if republicans would offer an amendment trying to reinstate the second sentence of the original resolution that the house of representatives deleted earlier this year.

District 40 Senator Mark Stoops says he was confident that reinserting the second sentence would be defeated. However, there were other aspects to the reading that were surprising.

“The fact that they chose not to call the amendment at all was a real surprise,” Stoops says “It was a very strange session in that HJR-3 was called for the second reading and then there was silence. Everyone waited to hear if the amendment was going to be called and it wasn’t. That was the end.”

The 2014 legislative session has centered around HJR-3. Chambers of commerce, education institutions, and politicians statewide have joined civil rights advocates in voicing their dissent for the resolution.

“I’m sure what happened is that it became completely obvious to the Republican caucus that there were not enough votes for the second sentence,” Stoops says, “They didn’t want to get beaten up further on that bill. I think a lot of Republicans are pretty embarrassed that this bill is moving forward.”

Governor Mike Pence has supported the effort to amend the constitution in regards to marriage in Indiana, and called for it to be on the 2014 ballot. The soonest HJR3 would not be sent to referendum is 2016 – if the general assembly at the time adopts it exactly as it is stated now. Stoops speculates that Pence will try to avoid timing the ratification with his reelection.

“Governor Pence wanted this HJR-3 on the ballot in 2014 because he didn’t want it pushed until 2016 because he’s running for reelection that year,” Stoops says, “He knows that it’s a device of issue and that it will pull a lot of independents and democrats out to vote who might not normally have voted, which means he’d probably lose the reelection.”

Stoops predicted the third reading of HJR-3 will occur on Monday.

Senator Steele’s Proposed Hunting and Fishing Amendment Passes

Senator Brent Steele’s proposal to amend Indiana’s constitution to guarantee residents the right to hunt, fish, and harvest wildlife passed on a 43 to 4 vote by the full Senate on Monday.

Steele’s Joint Resolution 9 provides that the right to hunt, fish, and harvest wildlife is a valued part of Indiana’s heritage, and should be preserved for the public good. SJR-9 states that hunting and fishing are the preferred means of managing and controlling wildlife.

This constitutional amendment does not limit the application of any law relating to trespass or property rights. 17 other states over the past several years have added the constitutional right to hunt and fish.

The Indiana government, along with seven other states, is considering bills in 2014 that propose the creation of a state constitutional amendment to protect the same right.

SJR-9 now moves to the House of Representatives for further consideration.

League of Women Voters Held Open Forum With State Representatives

State legislators representing the Monroe County area gave their views on more than a dozen pieces of proposed legislation at a forum last Saturday.

The forum was sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Bloomington-Monroe County, which holds monthly legislative updates when the state legislature is in session.

State Senator Mark Stoops, as well as representatives Bob Heaton, Peggy Mayfield, Matt Pierce, and Eric Koch participated. The group was asked first about HJR-3, the measure to ban same-sex marriage in the Indiana Constitution. The question came from Bloomington resident Trish Kerle, who is also a host on the WFHB program Interchange.

“It is illegal to destroy a gun in Indiana, but it’s not illegal to limit a woman’s right to choose, nor to limit the rights of two adults to marry if they are the same gender,” Kerle said, “My question is to the representatives who voted in favor of HJR-3. What specific evidence do you have that my marriage to my partner will be detrimental to you or any of your constituents?”

Like many other issues, the support for the marriage amendment broke down along party lines.

The three Republicans — Heaton, Mayfield and Koch — all voted for the amendment. Heaton said he only wants to give voters the chance to decide on the issue in a referendum, which is required before an amendment can pass.

“As far as with you and your partner, I don’t care what two individuals do in their home,” Heaton said, “I’m being consistent with my message in that I will let the people to vote for it, or not, come this fall.”

Kerle tried to press Heaton further, because he didn’t provide the evidence she asked for, but the moderator stopped her.

Koch and Mayfield also declined to answer the question, saying it didn’t apply to the current debate over HJR-3.

“This question is not what the debate surrounding HJR-3 is about,” Koch said, “We’ve had a definition of marriage since the 80’s, that’s current law. The discussion surrounding HJR-3 is whether the people of Indiana should be able to use a mechanism given to them in their constitution to prevent that law from being overturned by the judicial branch, by unelected judges. So, the policy has been in place since the 1980’s, and that’s not what this discussion is about.”

Mayfield added that the process the amendment is going through is the topic of the discussion, not its merits or lacktherof.

The marriage amendment has passed the House of Representatives, but a portion of the text was removed. Unless the Senate changes the language back to its original form, the measure won’t be on the ballot next year.

The legislators were also asked about a bill that would require drug testing for people receiving benefits through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. Pierce opposed the bill, and he said similar measures in other states have been expensive and have led to very little discovered drug use.

“The saddest thing for me, is that I think the bill is based on an attempt to drum up the worst stereotypes people have about those on public assistance,” Pierce said, “Most people on public assistance are working hard, and they are the exact people my Republican friends like because they are out working hard and not just waiting for a hand-out. They are trying to get ahead.”

Heaton defended his support for the bill, saying he recently surveyed his constituents about the issue.

“The question was, ‘Do you believe Indiana, like some other states, should submit random drug testing as a requirement in receiving government assistance,” Heaton said, “81 percent said yes, and I know you don’t like to hear that, but that’s just who I represent and who I vote on behalf of.”

Karen Green-Stone, from Hoosiers for a Commonsense Health Plan, asked the group about Medicaid expansion. So far Indiana has declined federal funding offered through the Affordable Care Act, which would expand Medicaid coverage to approximately 350,000 people who have incomes too low to afford insurance through the federal exchange. Stoops said the state loses millions of dollars a day by refusing the expansion.

“In a state where we have high unemployment rates still, we are actually turning our back on 30,000 healthcare and other related jobs that this Medicaid expansion would have brought to Indiana,” Stoops said.

Mayfield did not say she was opposed to Medicaid expansion, but she said she supported Governor Mike Pence’s delay in accepting the funding.

“Governor Pence made that decision early on and I think that he has a cautious approach,” Mayfield said, “I think that there is something between the broad expansion of Medicaid and maybe a more limited expansion using just HIP, and honestly I think that’s what they’re investigating and I think they need to continue that.”

HIP is the Healthy Indiana Plan, which provides subsidies for some low-income residents to buy private insurance. There is a long waiting list for the program, but Pence has proposed expanding it to cover more people.

Pierce said there are problems with that approach, but he is willing to negotiate with conservatives on the issue.

“I said I think that there are a lot of politics involved with this is because it’s an Obama program and a lot of voters don’t like Obama or the program,” Pierce said, “I think that the Governor knows that something needs to change in order to get this done. I expect something will happen before the end of the year, which is unfortunate because people won’t have coverage. It’s not tenable to be an island of the uninsured.”

The next legislative update sponsored by the League of Women Voters is scheduled for March 1 at 9:30 a.m, in the Bloomington City Council chambers.

Scroll To Top