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bloomingOUT – July 2, 2015

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Join hosts Ryne Shadday and Jeff Poling as they talk with IU Mauer School of Law Professor and Huffington Post contributor Steve Sanders. You’ll also hear some of the latest LGBTQ+ headlines and events in and around Bloomington.

We also introduced our new theme music for the show, provided by Aaron Gage. Find more of Aaron’s work at aarongagemusic.com

Hosts – Ryne Shadday, Jeff Poling
Executive Producer – Joe Crawford
Producer and Engineer – Olivia Davidson
Social Media Coordinator – Megan McCullough

bloomingOUT – March 19, 2014

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Join co-host Ryne Shadday as he interviews co-host Erica Dorsey and producer Olivia Davidson about their backgrounds and involvement with the show. We also hear another episode of the weekly segment “Out on Campus” along with calendar events and news.

Hosts – Ryne Shadday and Erica Dorsey
Executive Producer – Joe Crawford
Producer – Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator – Hayley Bass
Board Engineer – Carissa Barrett

bloomingOUT – January 22, 2015

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Join cohosts Jeff Poling and Erica Dorsey as they discuss the upcoming Bloomington PRIDE Film Festival with Sarah Perfetti and Rene Henry! Also hear this week’s Out on Campus, featuring a discussion about “traditional” marital roles and the relationship between religious services and being LGBTQ+.

Hosts – Jeff Poling, Erica Dorsey
Executive Producer – Alycin Bektesh
Producer – Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator – Hayley Bass
Board Engineer – Carissa Barrett

BloomingOUT – January 8, 2015

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Tonight, hosts Jeff Jewel and Justin Ford discuss with Bobbie Emetu issues facing the transgender community, societal attitudes on the community, social media, and how it all connects to the recent tragic death of Leelah Alcorn. Our weekly segments “Out on Campus” and “First Year Out” are also highlighted in this week’s show.

Hosts – Jeff Jewel, Justin Ford
Executive Producer – Alycin Bektesh
Producer – Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator – Hayley Bass
Board Engineer – Carissa Barrett

bloomingOUT – December 4, 2014

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Tonight, hosts Ryne Shadday and Jeff Poling interview Barry McGee, artistic director of the Quarryland Men’s Chorus, and we hear a couple of songs from the group as well. We also hear from various community members at a recent Trans Day of Remembrance Day on Out on Campus. Frankie Price-Preslaff introduces his newest segment about being a gay father trying to raise eight children with his partner Kelly Compton in Bloomington, Indiana.

Executive Producer – Alycin Bektesh
Producer – Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator – Hayley Bass
Board Engineer – Carissa Barrett
News Coordinator – Ryne Shadday
Music Director – Jeff Poling
Hosts – Jeff Poling and Ryne Shadday

BloomingOUT – August 21, 2014

Monroe County (Bloomington IN) Circuit Court (sixth seat) Judge Valeri Haughton discusses marriage equality and racism. IU alum, former WFHB volunteer, journalist and activist Delphine Criscenzo talks about black women living in suburbia as well as racial violence in general. Classic and neo-burlesque performer Tessa Von Twinkle chats about the art of burlesque performance and her upcoming performances in Bloomington IN, Nashville, IN and New Orleans, LA.

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Board Engineers Jasmine Mallet & Olivia Davison
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Them Music Mikial Robertson

Gay Sensibility in Historical Preservation: Will Fellows discusses his “passion to preserve”

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On May 2, 2014 Will Fellows, author of Farm Boys and A Passion to Preserve, gave a presentation to an audience at the Buskirk Chumley theater. The lecture covered the material in his most recent book, A Passion to Preserve. In the book Mr. Fellows analyzes how an affinity for historic preservation is commonly shared by gay men and straight women. He examines the specific cultural identity of gay men that leads to this seeming stereotype being true in many cases. The lecture kicked off National Preservation month and is part of the Rosemary P. Miller lecture series. The talk was recorded live on location for Standing room only, on WFHB.

Pride Film Fest Co-Director on Upcoming Scheduled Pride Events

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The 11th Annual Bloomington Pride Film Festival takes place tonight, Saturday, and Sunday at the Buskirk Chumley Theater. Its films will explore a wide variety of issues and situations involving gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities. The weekend-long festival also includes live performances, a dance party, and a mass LGBTQ wedding. Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with co-director Sarah Perfetti about the festival for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

HJR-3 Advances Through The Indiana House

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This morning the Indiana House of Representatives adopted the committee report from yesterday’s Elections and Apportionment Committee meeting, during which House Joint Resolution 3 passed, 9 to 3.

The proposed amendment to the Indiana constitution, which explicitly states that same sex couples do not have the right to get married, may now continue through the legislative process, and is expected to have a second reading before the House on Monday.

District 61 Representative Matt Pierce spoke on the floor today during the adoption, warning that the unprecedented process in which the bill came to the house floor would set a precedent for future speakers of the house to rearrange the legislative process to get the outcome they are looking for, just as House Speaker Brian Bosma reassigned HJR-3 once it fell short in the Judiciary committee.

“I made the argument that what the speaker had done was unprecedented,” Pierce said, “It was like a golfer taking a mulligan when they get their resolution stuck in the sand trap. It created a system where you can just have a do-over until you get the result you want. What the speaker did that was so unique is that he actually had a bill in a judiciary committee, the public testimony was taken, the committee had been educated on the issue, they were at the point where a vote could be taken and they obviously delayed it because they knew it wasn’t going to come out the way they wanted it to. For the speaker to then take the bill away from the judiciary committee and put it into elections, where clearly he had counted his votes to know he’d get a good reaction, is what is unprecedented. I ask for the members in the house to reject the committee report to essentially say we don’t want to set the precedent of having these mulligans going on every time we have a controversial bill. It did not work.”

House Representative and Elections and Apportionment committee member Woody Burton, District 58 is quoted in the Indianapolis Star acknowledging that there is a divide between the younger and older Republican members of the house and their views towards marriage equality, but a sister bill introduced this month may be a way of modifying the original bill to retain the vote of the more tolerant Republicans.

House Bill 1153 explains away a sentence regarding civil unions in the original resolution without actually making changes that would force the process back to square one, because the amendment can only be sent to a referendum if it is passed twice with the exact same language by two different assemblies.

Pierce says the companion bill brought additional challenges, rather than solutions.

“That bill actually catalogued all the potential unintentional consequences of that amendment,” Pierce said, “I think they thought that by listing them, that would be kind of like a lifeboat that a lot of republicans could put themselves in and feel safe enough to go ahead and vote for the amendment as is. What I think what happened instead is that after they heard from some legal experts explaining how it was unprecedented, that backfired and caused some members of the judiciary committee to decide they wouldn’t vote for it.”

Similar bills in nearby states have been ruled unconstitutional–most recently a federal judge in Ohio ruled their gay marriage ban as such.

Pierce says that when issues of discrimination and legality come up, proponents of HJR-3 claim that the decision is not theirs to make.

“Oftentimes issues come up asking is this bill constitutional?” Pierce said, “The truth of the matter is that since it’s a joint resolution amending the constitution, it automatically becomes constitutional once it becomes part of the constitution. The real issue is whether or not it’s unconstitutional under the federal constitution. The attitude of most members when that comes up is that they can come up with their own ideas of what’s constitutional or not, and that I will decide what’s the best policy and it’s the job of the court to decide whether the ruling is unconstitutional.”

When HJR-3 is brought to the House Floor, most likely on Monday, any Representative can offer amendments to the bill.  Amendments must have a majority of favorable votes to become adopted but with Republicans holding a super majority it is unlikely that any amendment offered by a democratic representative would pass.

Additionally, if HJR-3 is made too dissimilar to 2011’s HJR-6, it would not qualify for referendum this year. Pierce says the democrats are working on their strategy over the weekend, and have until two hours prior to the House Chamber meeting to offer amendments to be read on the house floor on Monday.

Bloomington City Council Passes Resolution Supporting Same-Sex Marriage in Response to HJR6

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The Bloomington City Council passed a resolution in support of same-sex marriage yesterday. The four-page resolution was a response to House Joint Resolution 6, which seeks to add a same-sex marriage ban to the Indiana Constitution. One of the resolution’s sponsors, Council Member Susan Sandberg, defended the council’s choice to take a position on the issue.

“This is the right thing to do at the right time in our history,” Sandberg said, “I stand up proudly for it and I will take any criticism from the media. We have plenty of time to take care of the ‘traditional’ city business but when it comes to resolutions, this council has always taken stands that people say are not in our jurisdiction, we take these opportunities to allow these to serve as public forums.”

11 members of the public spoke in favor of the resolution.

Faith Hawkins, a citizen, said she married her partner in 1996, but the marriage is not legally recognized. Hawkins declared that her reason for support is that she doesn’t want to be at the hospital not being able to find out her partner’s medical status because her next of kin relationship with her is not recognized.

Another member of the public, Glorianne Leck, said she and her partner traveled to New York to get married earlier this year. She said there were financial reasons for the marriage. She wants for her partner to be able to collect her social security but that the cost of the trip should have gone to regular wedding costs.

“I have long said that being queer is what I’m most proud of because I’m not conforming for anybody,” Leck said, “But now I’ve been hogtied into marriage because of the financial need we have as elders.”

Charlotte Zietlow also addressed the council. Zietlow is a member of the city’s Board of Public Works, and she served on the City Council in 1975, when the council voted to include sexual orientation in the city’s Human Rights Ordinance. She said the provision came up for discussion again during the 1990’s.

“I’m touched because those meetings were very conentious and hate-filled,” Zietlow said, “Tonight we have a group speaking from the heart without fear of being yelled at by other members of the community. That is such an incredible sign of progress we should be proud of.”

No one spoke against the resolution, and the council approved it unanimously.

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