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Best of 2013 #7- Indiana stays HIP: the ACA & the Twenty-Nine Hour Work Week

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A source of national controversy and the impetus behind the October shutdown of the federal government, the ACA produced two big issues in Indiana. The creation of the 29-hour work week allowed employers to avoid providing health care benefits to part-time workers, and Indiana lawmakers refused to create an Indiana insurance exchange, rejected Federal Medicaid expansion monies, and chose to seek approval for the revamped Healthy Indiana Plan system as an alternative. As 2013 started, businesses, schools, and local governments began looking at ways to implement the requirements of the ACA, slated to go into effect at the beginning of 2014. As early as January, administrators were looking at ways to cut employee hours in order to avoid providing health insurance. Without employer coverage, many of these workers turned to the state, where Mike Pence’s refusal to create a state insurance exchange or to take part in ACA Medicaid expansion is expected to leave at least 400,000 people in poverty without the ability to get insurance even under an expanded Healthy Indiana Plan.

Bring It On! – December 23, 2013

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Bev Smith and William Hosea joined Eric Love, Liz Mitchell, and Leila Randle

PART ONE
It’s Christmas time and while last week’s temperature climb and torrential rains melted away all vestiges of snow, we at Bring It On still wanted to gather around the ol’ Yule log and talk about our favorite memories and family traditions for the season.

Joining Bev and William for a special Christmas edition of Bring It On to talk about their favorite Christmas memories and traditions are Eric Love, Liz Mitchell, and Leila Randle.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 6

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Hola Bloomington – December 20, 2013

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Hostess Johann Mercado and Sandra Santana bring us a special holiday program with Traditions of Christmas Eve and New Year’s from different countries of Latin America. Listen to all the different food being cooked and desserts from countries like Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, Chile and so on.

Listen to the events of the week and the segment of “Desde los pasillos.”  Merry Christmas!

Best of 2013 #8 – A Year of Government Dysfunction: The Sequester and the Shutdown

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One of the biggest national stories in 2013 was the continuing inability for the Federal Government to govern in a bi-partisan manner or in fact to govern at all. Beginning with the automatic cuts commonly referred to as the sequester in March as a result of the Budget Control Act of 2011 and reaching a breaking point with the October government shut down, political infighting, intransigence, and incompetence set the tone for 2013 and affected everyone from the inner circle in DC to the residents here in Monroe County.

CREDITS
The best of 2013 is a production of the WFHB news department.
Today’s episode was produced by Jennifer Whitaker. Correspondents David Murphy, Casey Kuhn, Producers Carolyn VandeWiele and Ilze Ackerbergs and WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford contributed to today’s reports.
Our theme music is provided by Legs
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

bloomingOUT – December 19, 2013

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Bloomington Pride Film Festival Co-Directors Abby Henkel and Sarah Perfetti provide information about this year’s event scheduled for 23-25 January 2014 at the Buskirk-Chumley Theatre. IU School of Public Health Professor Debra Herbenick and Michael discuss LGBTQIA issues related to family and personal interactions during the holidays on a new edition of Sexual Health Matters. Featured artist is singer/songwriter Bobby Blue. Musical selections are “Blue Island” and gay wedding song “He Loves Me.”

www.bloomingtonpride.org
www.info.publichealth.indiana.edu/faculty
www.bobbyblue.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producers Sarah Hetrick & Nick Tumino
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick

EcoReport – Myke Luurtsema: Hoosier Forest Watch

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Director Alycin Bektesh speaks with Myke Luurtsema of the Hoosier Forest Watch, and Indiana Forester John Seifert, about the logging currently happening in Indiana’s protected back county areas.

The Strike Mic – December 17, 2013

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This week on The Strike Mic, a weekend march in response to the passing of Ian Stark, and the underlying issues of social services and homelessness in Bloomington.

Bloomington Utilities Department Give Up Trying To Collect Nearly $23,000 Bills

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The Bloomington Utilities Department is formally giving up on collecting almost $23,000 in overdue bills. Each year the department declares certain bills to be, as it calls them, uncollectable.

Yesterday the department’s assistant financial director, Michael Horstman, told the Utilities Service Board that 673  wastewater bills and 691 water bills fit the criteria for the department to officially stop attempting to collect them.

Sam Frank, chair of the board’s finance sub-committee, said that doesn’t mean the city might not collect some of the money.

“The finance sub-committee met before this meeting and went over these and we have recommended that these be approved to be written off,” Horstman says, “These can be collected any time later on, and this is more of just an accounting transaction.”

All of the affected accounts were inactive and more than ninety days overdue. Horstman said no more than forty dollars was owed on a given account. The board voted unanimously to write off the uncollectible bills.

Real Christmas Trees Growing in Popularity in American Homes

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Real Christmas trees are making a comeback this year, according to a specialist at Purdue University. Daniel Cassens, professor at the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, says more than one billion dollars will be spent in the United States this year bringing real Christmas trees into the house. He says the environmental impact of real trees versus that of fake trees has become something of a debate in recent years. A Christmas tree farmer himself, Cassens says there are benefits to avoiding the more convenient, artificial trees.

“It’s a difficult thing to measure because there are so many variables involved,” Cassens says, “If you look at a real tree, you see it takes in carbon dioxide and keeps it in the ground. Depending on how the tree is disposed of, the rest of the carbon is released in the atmosphere and can be

Cassens says artificial Christmas trees are petroleum-based products, which release carbon stored in the ground, becoming directly harmful to the environment. Shipping artificial trees to the United States creates another source of impact.

“About all the artificial trees are manufactured overseas,” Cassens says, “Real trees grown here create local jobs and contribute to the local economy. Fake trees, as they’re shipped, also takes energy and pollutes the environment.”

Proponents of the artificial Christmas tree industry point out that its product can be reused, saving real trees from being cut down, and that artificial trees of course do not need fertilizers or pesticides. If you’ve decided you want a real tree in your house this year, Cassens says there are a few things to keep in mind.

“If you’re a first time real-tree-buyer, you want to be careful not to get too big a tree, “Cassen says, “Stay within the five to six feet category, at the most nine feet. They are more manageable and the bigger the tree, the more difficult to handle. Also, make sure to have a high-quality

When the holidays are over, Cassens says, there are also options to consider when getting rid of a real tree.

“One option, that is the most simple, is to take the tree and put it in your backyard until spring,” Cassen says, “Most towns also have recycling centers that turn real Christmas trees into mulch.”

For more information on real Christmas trees, or how to find a choose-and-cut tree farm in your area, you can visit the National Christmas Tree Growers Association online at RealChristmastrees.org.

 

 

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