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Interchange – Minded By Algorithms: Digitizing the Word

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Host Doug Storm talks with Ted Striphas, an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication & Culture at Indiana University and the author of the 2009 title The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control, about the ways that book technology has evolved and the ways in which humans evolved with it. 

In discussing the digitization of “the word” we look at  Amazon.com’s Kindle: not only at the ways we read Kindles (and how they mimic the form of the book) but also how Kindles read us by sending information about our very marginalia back into the Cloud of knowing.

We also discuss the ways in which a digital information age bears a striking resemblance to what Hannah Arendt called a society where “there is nobody left with whom one could argue, to whom one could present grievances…in which everybody is deprived of political freedom, of the power to act; for the rule by Nobody is not no-rule, and where all are equally powerless we have a tyranny without a tyrant.”

‘Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense’ in Indiana Fight Bill That Would Allow Guns on School Property

The Indiana Chapter of an organization called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is fighting the passage of Senate Bill 229.

The bill would allow the carrying of firearms on school property, including in buses. It would also allow for firearms to be carried to off-campus school events such as graduation, prom, and field trips.

Nicki McNally, the Indiana chapter leader of the organization, believes that having more guns more places, especially where there are children, is not the right thing to do. She says it is extremely dangerous and will increase the risk of gun related incidents occurring.

The group also says the bill need some clarification, like whether or not a bus-driver would be allowed to carry a firearm while transporting students. Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America has a goal to create awareness and support for common sense gun reforms.

McNally advises fellow Hoosiers to send messages to Speaker Brian Bosma and the House Public Policy Committee in order to prevent the passage of this bill.

Habitat for Humanity Pushing to Develop on Controversial Land

The Bloomington Plan Commission voted February 24 to fast-track approval for a 35 home subdivision in what is currently an urban forest along the B-Line Trail.

Habitat for Humanity is seeking to develop the wooded area north of downtown between the B-Line and Reverend Ernest D. Butler Park.

Kerry Thompson, the president of Monroe County Habitat for Humanity, said her organization is running out of spaces to build in Bloomington.

“The largest obstacle for Habitat in recent years has been land,” Thompson said, “There simply are not enough infill lots remaining in the city of BLoomington to meet the needs of families. There is no affordable home ownership option close to the city center.”

The project would require the organization to cut down 64 percent of the trees in the area, which concerned many neighbors who attended the meeting. Some also questioned the high density of the proposed neighborhood and the revelation that soil is contaminated with lead, coal ash and other pollutants.

Marti Crouch, a biologist who lives near the site, said some might undervalue the wooded area in its current state.

“We have very little of that type of diverse native, urban forest in contiguous pieces in our city,” Crouch said, “I’m not sure what the definition of infill is, but I’m concerned that if the planning department thinks that every little green space needs to be turned into buildings and structures because that will somehow save outer areas from being developed, I’d like to see some facts on that.”

Crouch was referring to comments by local developer Matt Press, who described himself as a proponent of “good urban infill the right way.”

Press said denying Habitat this development would just force it to build houses on the outskirts of Bloomington.

“Nothing in the real world happens in a vacuum,” Press said, “The homeowners are already here in our community. If we say no to this project they will either continue to live in sub-standard housing or they will move into a new Habitat home, now likely built on a larger lot on the edge of town. That lot, in turn, would displace a market-rate home that will inevitably be built on yet a bigger piece of land on yet another former farm or forest.”

One major dispute involved Habitat’s request that the commission waive the requirement for a second hearing on the development.

Thompson said the organization wanted to speed up the city’s approval process so it could clear the forest by an April 1 deadline.

“Our request was made after we discovered that the Indiana bat could come to roost in the area,” Thompson said, “We had no intention to rush this process, in fact we have engaged pretty fully in the public comment process. We build by federal environmental regulations and unfortunately we have never encountered this stipulation for tree-clearing prior to April 1.”

Federal guidelines prohibit clearing trees from April through October to prevent disturbing roosting Indiana bats, which are endangered.

But several neighbors said they had just recently heard about Habitat’s plans, and they want more time to consider the implications of the new subdivision. Ruth Beasley was one of those neighbors.

“Finally, tonight, I’m getting bits and pieces of what I consider very complicated information,” Beasley said, “I want to read the documents for myself before I make a decision. I too have worked on Habitat houses. I love my Habitat neighbors. My daughter’s best friend has worked so hard to get her Habitat House. But I feel cheated in time to think, time to talk to my neighbors about what they think and I strongly urge you not to do away with the second hearing.”

Despite concerns from neighbors, the commission voted to waive the second hearing and forward the development to the City Council.

The council will hold two meetings on the issue before voting to approve to reject the proposal.

Bring It On! – March 3, 2014

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Clarence Boone and Bev Smith welcome Monroe County Community School Corporation talent and diversity specialist, Diane Hanks.

PART ONE
On Tonight’s show, Clarence and Bev welcome Diane Hanks, talent and diversity specialist for the Monroe County Community School Corporation, to the show.

Diane, the former vice-principal at Tri-North Middle School, joined the MCCSC in the new role in October of 2013. Her strategic role to bolster the pool of diverse talent in order to increase the number of MCCSC staff members who are minorities.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Clarence Boone and Bev Smith
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Daily Local News – March 3, 2014

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The Indiana House has voted in favor of Senate Bill 101, which further criminalizes trespassing within the agricultural industry; An economic researcher at Ball State University has found that the percentage of working-age people in Indiana currently employed or looking for work has been declining since the onset of the Great Recession in 2008, and is likely to stay low into the future; The Bloomington Plan Commission voted February 24th to fast-track approval for a 35-home subdivision in what is currently an urban forest along the B-Line Trail; The Indiana University Student Association is searching for candidates for its 2014 elections.

FEATURE
IU: No Written Contracts on University Courts Deal
As Bloomington officials debate this week whether to designate the University Courts neighborhood as a historic district, plans are moving forward to demolish six of its houses. Indiana University plans to tear down the homes along East 8th Street, and then trade the land to a fraternity that would build a house there. The plan has angered neighbors and others who want to protect the houses. And in November, WFHB submitted a public record request to IU seeking contracts and other documents that would provide details about the deal. After months of negotiations, IU responded last week, but the response raises even more questions about how the deal would work. We bring you that story now, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

ACTIVATE!
Ashley Hall of the United Way talks about the Free Community Tax Services program being coordinated by United Way and other Bloomington business and institutions.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by Olivia DeWeese and David Murphy,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford.
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker,
Our engineer today is Chris Martin,
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

IU: No Written Contracts on University Courts Deal

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As Bloomington officials debate this week whether to designate the University Courts neighborhood as a historic district, plans are moving forward to demolish six of its houses. Indiana University plans to tear down the homes along East 8th Street, and then trade the land to a fraternity that would build a house there. The plan has angered neighbors and others who want to protect the houses. And in November, WFHB submitted a public record request to IU seeking contracts and other documents that would provide details about the deal. After months of negotiations, IU responded last week, but the response raises even more questions about how the deal would work. We bring you that story now, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Activate! – Free Community Tax Services: Ashley Hall

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Ashley Hall of the United Way talks about the Free Community Tax Services program being coordinated by United Way and other Bloomington business and institutions.

Hola Bloomington – February 28, 2014

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Hostess Minerva Sosa and Jose Toledo interview Prisma Lopez-Marin Assistant programmer  from the Community and Family Resources Department, Latino Outreach. She talks about the service the City is providing to help people filling out their taxes. Also our guest Colin Airriess explain his job about being an interpreter for the people who don’t speak English.

Also our local news, sports, the events of the week and “mesa redonda” with Minerva Sosa.

Narrowing the Skills Gap: An Interview with Joe Donnelly

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Some are saying there is a skills gap in Indiana – that there are manufacturing jobs available but not enough skilled workers to fill them. Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly about his support for the Midwestern Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, which he hopes will train Indiana workers with the skills needed to get those jobs, and his involvement with the Skills2Compete Coalition, a bipartisan group that aims to close the skills gap in Indiana. She then spoke with Indiana University Labor Studies Professor Joe Varga about the economics behind the skills gap, all for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Daily Local News – February 28, 2014

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The Office of Enrollment Management at Indiana University Bloomington has hired an associate director to find more effective ways to find students from underrepresented populations; The Bloomington City Council showed approval February 26th on placing historic protections on a neighborhood just east of Indiana University; The City of Bloomington Commission on the Status of Women will host a women’s leadership event called Social Justice: Women Take Action; This weekend in local sports.

FEATURE
Narrowing the Skills Gap: An Interview with Joe Donnelly
Some are saying there is a skills gap in Indiana – that there are manufacturing jobs available but not enough skilled workers to fill them. Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly about his support for the Midwestern Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, which he hopes will train Indiana workers with the skills needed to get those jobs, and his involvement with the Skills2Compete Coalition, a bipartisan group that aims to close the skills gap in Indiana. She then spoke with Indiana University Labor Studies Professor Joe Varga about the economics behind the skills gap, all for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Alycin Bektesh
Today’s headlines were written by Daion Morton and Jalisa Ransom,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Lauren Glapa.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer and editor today is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Becktesh.

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