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Board of Directors Vote to Shut Down Jill’s House

Last Thursday, the Board of Directors of Jill’s House voted to shut the organization down. Jill’s House is a nonprofit home with over 25 rooms for cancer patients to live during treatment. The organization opened in 2008 and has been a home to over 600 patients. It will be closing on December 31, the same day that the IU Health Proton Therapy Center is closing. IU health officials have said the facility is closing due to financial deficit. Jill’s House was founded by the parents of Jill Behrman, who was abducted in 2000 while bike riding near her home. Behrman’s parents created the nonprofit with the parents of Steven Howard, who died of cancer at the age of 19. IU announced earlier this month that it was not financially viable to continue to operate the Proton Therapy Center.

Same Sex Couples in Indiana are Still Unable to Marry

Same sex couples in Indiana are still not able to marry, at least until the Supreme Court addresses the case later this month. Yesterday, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals approved a stay on same-sex marriage in Indiana. The stay is holding the lower court’s ruling from September 4th that the same-sex marriage ban in Indiana is unconstitutional, and will be held until dealt with by the U.S. Supreme Court. On June 25, same-sex marriage was temporarily legal after a ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Richard Yung. Two days later, the Seventh Circuit Court ordered an emergency stopping to same-sex marriages. On September 29th, the Supreme Court will address the case in a closed-door conference to either hold or lift the ban.

Local Campus Police Continue Receiving Surplus Military Gear

The national debate about militarized police forces continues as awareness grows about local campus police acquiring surplus military gear. The Indianapolis Star reports that Indiana University is one of at least five campus police departments that have received surplus military gear in the last four years. Surplus gear can include body armor, military vehicles and M-14 or M-16 rifles. Recent incidents of lone assailants creating public massacres using high-powered weaponry have raised concerns about police and campus resources. Yet after the much-publicized shooting of 18-year old Michael Brown by Ferguson, Missouri police, lawmakers held congressional hearings last week on the subject. Claire McGaskill, Democratic Senator from Missouri, called for limits to programs that supply police with military equipment. According to records obtained at the IU Department of Administration, Bloomington campus police have received six M-16 rifles as well as helmets and bullet-proof vests. Officer Jerry Minger, who oversees seven campus police departments at Indiana University, says the rifles have been modified so they are not fully automatic. He claims they are appropriate for campus police force use. Minger is quoted in the star saying “Police departments are typically not warriors, they’re typically guardians of a community. How do you protect the community if you don’t have the appropriate equipment to do so?” Herb Terry, former president of the Indiana University Faculty Council, says he trusts the IU campus police will use discretion with the armament and suggested the thing to monitor might be the people wielding the weapons, not the weapons themselves, saying he does not believe the IU police department is over-militarized.

Questions for Governor Pence from Superintendent Glenda Ritz

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Indiana Superintendent Glenda Ritz received more votes in the 2012 election than Governor Mike Pence yet has been stymied by his administration throughout her first term. In fact, speaking to the Bloomington Press Club this afternoon Ritz said during this upcoming legislative session, Pence could sign away the state’s  education budget to a new agency that he created. Her remarks and audience questions are here, in today’s community report.

Daily Local News – September 15, 2014

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Ahead of a statewide launch of the “Moral Mondays” movement in Indianapolis this weekend, Bloomington’s Moral Monday contingent is holding a meeting this evening at 7pm in meeting room one-bee of the Monroe County Public Library; Indiana health officials are reporting an increase in the number of children with respiratory illnesses; Starting October 10, IU’s Grunwald Gallery will be showcasing previously unreleased photographs from artist Robert Mapplethorpe; The Monroe County Community Corrections Department could have dozens of extra clients in the coming year, but not necessarily much more money to serve them;  The Bloomington Board of Public Works is continuing to approve food truck permits while city staff works on new rules for the vendors.

FEATURE
Indiana Superintendent Glenda Ritz received more votes in the 2012 election than Governor Mike Pence yet has been stymied by his administration throughout her first term. In fact, speaking to the Bloomington Press Club this afternoon Ritz said during this upcoming legislative session, Pence could sign away the state’s  education budget to a new agency that he created. Her remarks and audience questions are here, in today’s community report.

ACTIVATE
Now it’s time for Activate, our weekly segment spotlighting people working for positive change in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by Alycin Bektesh, David Murphy, Harrison Wagner, and Steven Williamson
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Dan Withered produced todays community report
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker,
Our engineer is Chris Martin,
Joe Crawford is our managing producer
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Bring It On! – September 15th, 2014

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William Hosea and Beverly Calender-Anderson welcome Toby Strout and Debra Morrow.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, William and Beverly welcome Toby Strout, director of Middle Way House and Debra Morrow, the Volunteer Coordinator at Middle Way House. They are on for part one of a two part discussion discuss the fallout from the Ray Rice domestic assault case and the emotional and psychological factors that may have contributed to this violent attack.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea and Beverly Calender-Anderson
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Books Unbound – Frankenstein, Part 5

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was 18 when she and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley, visited some literary friends and got involved in a challenge, to see who could write the most frightening story. Out of a group that included the poet Lord Byron, only Mary’s story of a scientist who goes too far has lasted as a landmark of fantastic literature. Mary Shelley was twenty when the book was published.

Frankenstein was published in 1818, as the Industrial Revolution readied for takeoff in Europe. Science held out the promise of mankind’s triumph over nature, even over death itself – and electricity was the key. In the novel, a doctor uses electricity to re-animate parts of human corpses into a whole, living being – who, although hideous, develops intelligence and self-awareness – and finally turns against its creator. Frankenstein was banned in South Africa in 1955, for containing material deemed “indecent” and “obscene.”

Hola Bloomington – September 12, 2014

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Hola Bloomington’s hosts Carlos Bakota, Luis Hernandez, Maria Auxiliadora and Araceli Gómez-Aldana continue discussing the topic of immigration. Today’s topic is immigrant’s impact on the the economy. What are the problems the country is facing and if there are solutions.

Stephanie Boyles Griffin: Humane Society of the United States

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Stephanie Boyles Griffin, from the Humane Society of the United States, talks about nonlethal methods to successfully reduce and manage deer populations.

Local organizations receive grants to make Bloomington offically “Bike-Friendly”

Three organizations have received funds from the City of Bloomington to advance bicycle and pedestrian mobility in Bloomington. The Local-Motion grant program is an effort by the city to obtain bike-friendly community status from the League of American Bicyclists. Three thousand dollars were split between Middle Way House, the Bloomington Bike Project and Friends and the Buskirk Chumley Theater for a bike share program, a fellowship and a screening of Breaking Away. A second cycle of Local Motion grant applications will occur next spring.

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