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Hola Bloomington – October 3, 2013

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Hostess Minerva Sosa and José Toledo interview Fred Diego and Kary Carreño about being part of DREAMIU and their personal experiences in Bloomington. Also eco-report with Ramon Tristani. “Desde los pasillo..” with the students of the Academy. The news and the events of the week.

Volunteer Connection – October 4, 2013

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

Books Unbound – A Study in Scarlet, Part 6

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In this episode:
“A Study in Scarlet” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

About this Author:
Born on 22 May 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Arthur Conan Doyle went on to study medicine at Edinburgh University from 1876 to 1881, during which time he began writing short stories. His first published work was “The Mystery of Sasassa Valley,” which appeared in 1879. With the publication of A Study in Scarlet, Conan Doyle created the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson who would make him famous. He based the deductive reasoning that characterized Holmes on the techniques of Joseph Bell, one of his instructors in medical school. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died on 7 July 1930, far more famous as a writer than as a doctor.

About this book:
Originally titled “A Tangled Skein.” A Study in Scarlet first appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual (1887), and was published as a book in July, 1888. Twenty-seven year-old Conan Doyle received £25 for full rights to the story, which he had written in three weeks in 1886. The work, the first of only four full-length Sherlock Holmes novels, introduced the consulting detective and the faithful Dr. Watson, who also chronicled their adventures in fifty-six short stories to make the Baker Street team the most famous pair in detective fiction. Although it attracted little notice at the time, it’s portrayal of Mormonism soon became controversial.

About this program:
Books burn; ideas endure. Books Unbound is a weekly showcase of literary works banned by those who fear the power of the pen. The program promotes literary reading and curiosity, challenging listeners to consider viewpoints that may be different from our own. Each week we bring you literature prohibited by governments, schools, and religious institutions. In the words of French philosopher Emile-Auguste Chartier, “nothing is as dangerous as an idea, when it’s the only one you’ve got.” Books Unbound is a production of community radio WFHB in Bloomington, Indiana.

Daily Local News – October 4, 2013

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Members of the Bloomington City Council expressed support for next year’s budget at a recent hearing; A local organization called Affordable Care Act Volunteers of Monroe County will host a series of events, aiming to help the public sign up for the insurance provided by the act.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa and Yin Yuan,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer is Harrison Wagner,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Voices in the Street – Government Shutdown

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Our weekly public opinion feature Voices in the Street asks for your thoughts on the government shutdown.

EcoReport – Jody Perras: Sierra Club

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In today’s EcoReport feature, the Sierra Club’s Jody Perras talks with Correspondent Joe Crawford about new EPA rules on power plant emissions.

bloomingOUT – October 3, 2013

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IU LGBT Alumni Association President Mike Shumate provides information about their fund raising campaign to support LGBT specific scholarships.  A new edition of “Out on the Street” with Nick Tumino seeks public opinion in response to fundraising efforts for LGBTQA student scholarships.  At large Representative on the Bloomington Common Council Susan Sandberg stops by to chat about the new council resolution stating support for same sex marriage. Vice President of Spencer Pride Jacob Balash also stops by to talk about their fund raising event at the Tivoli Theatre on 9 October featuring the film “The Birdcage” and the Quarryland Men’s Chorus.

 

www.alumni.indiana.edu/affiliates/glbt/index.html

www.bloomington.in.gov/council

www.spencerpride.org

 

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original theme music provided by Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick
Guest co-host Nick Tumino

 

IU President McRobbie Announces Huge Media Digitization Initiative

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Earlier this week, Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie announced a comprehensive $15 million Media Preservation and Digitization Initiative. The Indiana University collections of video, recorded music and other media will be preserved and made accessible through an extensive digitization process.

Mark Land, Associate Vice President for Public Affairs, compliments the commitment to preserve the materials in digital format.

“Over the course of nearly 200 years of history, IU has accumulated a vast amount of material,” Land says, “Things that have scholarly or research importance. All of this material that has historical value will be preserved for future generations by digitizing them.”

According to Land, the proposed work is of a larger scale than that being done by any other universities. The plan is not only to preserve the material but also make it available to help support university research and education

“The plan is not only to digitize it but make it accessible for others and make it public,” Land says, “We have a history of being a leader in big data initiatives, from an IT perspective. We hope to have enough expertise to help other universities do the same thing.”

Land says the plans for the digitization have already been established. Many people throughout the university will help to decide what will be preserved, and the university information technology group will lead the digitization process.
The initiative will be funded with $15 million over the next five years. The money will come in equal parts of the president’s office, the Office of Research Administration, and IU Bloomington’s Provost office.

Monologue “Justice John Paul Stevens Dissents” Performance October 4th

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The monologue “Justice John Paul Stevens Dissents” will be held on October 4 in Bloomington.

The monologue was written by local activist James Allison, and will be performed by actor, violinist and school board member Lois Sabo-Skelton. Sabo-Skelton says that they are doing the event on behalf of the Move To Amend Organization.

“The two ideas is that a corporation is not a speech and money is not a speech, and that’s what ‘Justice John Paul Stevens Dissents’ is all about.” Sabo-Skelton says.

The monologue, based on Stevens’ dissent from the 2010 Citizens United ruling, focuses on the corruptive potential of limitless corporate spending in our elections.

The performance will be followed by a question and answer period, and a reception.  The performance is directed by Steve Krahnke, lighting and sound are by Andy Beargie. Sabo-Skelton explains her reasons for being involved in the performance.

“I am a violinist, I am an individual artist and I am very concerned about keeping our individual rights in our county,” Sabo-Skelton says, “Today, everything is so unequal with corporations having so much money that I feel like I have to come forth as an individual citizen and speak up.”

The performance will be held at 7pm on Oct 4th. It will take place in the Unitarian Universalist Church, 2110 Fee Lane in Bloomington.

It is free and open to public.

E-Cigarettes Under Scrutiny

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Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller and 39 other attorneys general are calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to place restrictions on the sale of electronic cigarettes.
In a bipartisan letter, the attorneys general urged the FDA to take all available measures to regulate e-cigarettes as tobacco products under the Tobacco Control Act. E-cigarettes are battery operated products that heat liquid nicotine, derived from tobacco plants, into a vapor that is inhaled by the user. Noting the growing use of e-cigarettes, and the growing prevalence of advertising, the letter highlights the need to protect youth from becoming addicted to nicotine through these new products. Additionally, some marketing claims that these products do not contain the same level of toxins and carcinogens found in traditional cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products. These claims imply that e-cigarettes are a safe alternative to smoking, when in fact nicotine is highly addictive, the health effects of e-cigarettes have not been adequately studied, and the ingredients are not regulated and may still contain carcinogens. WFHB Correspondent Nash Hott looks into the topic further by speaking with Deputy Director for Consumer Protection at the attorney general’s office Terry Toliver, for today’s WFHB feature report.

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