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Author Archives: WFHB News

Bring It On! – March 9, 2015

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Clarence Boone and William Hosea welcome Janet Cheatham Bell and Audrey McCluskey.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, Clarence and William welcome Janet Cheatham Bell and Audrey McCluskey. They join us to share their observations on society and their reflections on their joint book signing and presentations billed as “Righting History, Writing Truth”, during the City of Bloomington Black History Month kick-off and Reception on February 5th.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Clarence Boone and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Joe Crawford
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Employee Parking Garage Proposal

Tonight, the employee parking garage proposal from the Monroe County Commission will once again come before the Bloomington Plan Commission. Today, we spoke to Chris Sturbaum, a member of the Bloomington City Council and a member of the Plan Commission, about the proposal. He first explained why the initial county proposal was sent back for revision and what changes have been made in response.

“When the first proposal came out it was taller and it was uglier…we’ve been talking to them about making the front more attractive” said Sturbaum.

Sturbaum says the building’s proposed height is still a concern to the Commission. At 94 feet, it is considerably above the 50 foot standard limit for the area. But the city has approved several recent building proposals with heights more than 50 feet. That includes some immediate neighbors of the proposed garage. Furthermore, Sturbaum says the county’s efforts to keep most of its offices and other facilities in the downtown core, which complements the City’s efforts to densify this area, increase his willingness to approve the county garage proposal. New buildings in the area have also been required to include ground floor commercial space, in order to increase foot traffic and enliven the area generally. Sturbaum describes how the County has responded to this building provision.

Sturbaum said, “What’s peculiar about this building is it is taking the place of what they call “the cage” which is barbwire-topped metal fencing that technically is the overflow if there was some kind of emergency in the jail.”

Sturbaum says this unique county need should be accommodated by the Plan Commission. The county proposal also includes rooftop solar panels to power lighting for the facility. There is also provision for 10 electric vehicle plug in outlets and 20 spaces for bike parking. Sturbaum assumes that if future increases in need for these amenities can be relatively easily accommodated. Another issue is whether or not parking spaces in the county facility will be available to the general public during the working day or, especially, during the evening and on weekends and holidays.

“That was a request I specifically made and said, ‘the market is right across the street, could we work some kind of arrangement where market visitors could park in that garage?’ and what a great set up it would be” said Sturbaum.

Tonight’s Plan Commission Meeting is in the Bloomington Common Council Chambers, at City Hall, in the Showers Building, located at 401 North Morton Street, in downtown Bloomington. It was scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m. The general public is welcome to attend.

Enrollment in Indiana’s School Vouchers Program Rapidly Increasing

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The Center for Evaluation and Education Policy has found that enrollment in Indiana’s school vouchers program is rapidly increasing. News Director Joe Crawford spoke with a researcher at the Center for today’s WFHB community report.

Daily Local News – March 9, 2015

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A study out of Indiana University shows more and more students are using the state’s school voucher program;Tonight, the employee parking garage proposal from the Monroe County Commission will once again come before the Bloomington Plan Commission;The Bloomington City Council has approved a resolution finalizing a tax cut for a development on S. Walnut St.; Virologist Susana Lopez of the National University of Mexico will be at IU this Wednesday to discuss her crusade against gastroenteritis as part of the 34th Joan Wood Lecture Series.

FEATURE
The Center for Evaluation and Education Policy has found that enrollment in Indiana’s school vouchers program is rapidly increasing. News Director Joe Crawford spoke with a researcher at the Center for today’s WFHB community report.

ACTIVATE!
Your WFHB weekly segment spotlighting people working for positive change in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Doug Storm and Maria McKinley
Our engineer is Chris Martin
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker, along with the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Amanda Marino along with Alycin Bektesh for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by David Murphy
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Managing Producer is Alycin Bektesh
Executive producer is Joe Crawford

Activate! – Buskirk-Chumley Theater: Donna Cohen

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Donna Cohen shares anecdotes and her experience volunteering at the Buskirk-Chumley theater. Also, three volunteer opportunities available through the Buskirk.

LINKS
Bloomington Volunteer Network: Buskirk-Chumley Theater
Buskirk-Chumley Theater

Susana Lopez of the National University of Mexico at IU this Wednesday

Virologist Susana Lopez of the National University of Mexico will be at IU this Wednesday to discuss her crusade against gastroenteritis as part of the 34th Joan Wood Lecture Series. The lecture is part of a series whose focus is allowing students to interact with women in science.

Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the stomach and intestines that causes diarrhea and vomiting. Lopez is a molecular biologist whose work focuses on the rotavirus, the most likely cause of gastroenteritis in children.

According to a press release, she is specifically trying to understand how “rotavirus reacts to different forms of antiviral response activated in host cells upon infection.” She will discuss both the battle between viruses and cells and the methods she uses to research this phenomenon.

According to a 2012 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gastroenteritis causes about 17,000 United States deaths annually. Adults over 65 account for 83 percent of those deaths. The lecture will be held at 4 p.m. on Wednesday in the Myers Hall Room 130.

Books Unbound – The Many Voices of Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Part Two

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Born in New Orleans and an early figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Alice Dunbar-Nelson (1875–1935) considered fiction her most representative form of writing, but enjoyed more recognition as a poet. Much of her fiction was considered unsuited for the literary market, especially when it dealt with racial issues. As a multiracial woman, she identified strongly with “the race,” but was sometimes taken as white—and then penalized for “passing”. The ambivalence of racial identity is a theme throughout her work.

From the age of 19 Dunbar-Nelson was a regular columnist for black newspapers and journals. She worked tirelessly on behalf of education, women’s and labor rights, and what were then called Negro causes, especially anti-lynching legislation. She was a popular speaker on the lecture circuit for her eloquence, acerbic wit and passion as a public speaker, but for most of her life had to struggle to earn a decent living.

The extended podcast features two short stories read by Renee Reed, “The Pearl in the Oyster,” which deals with Dunbar-Nelson’s favorite themes of racial passing, education, politics and labor, and class boundaries; and “His Great Career,” an entertaining tale about old friends with a twist at the end. Berklea Going read “M’sieu Fortier’s Violin,” a story about an aging musician who loses his job with an orchestra; a poem of same-sex desire, “You! Inez!”; and the powerful “April Is on the Way”. The poems “The Proletariat Speaks,” “Violets, a Sonnet,” and “I Sit and Sew” are read by Cynthia Wolfe. Special music for the episode comes from the albums Barktok/Korcia and Dances/Doubles Jeux/Bartok by Laurent Korcia. Music for the opera scene in “M’sieu Fortier’s Violin” comes from the opera itself, Roland à Roncevaux by Auguste Mermet, from the album Tragédiennes (Erato). Sarah Torbeck hosts, with Doug Storm as announcer.

Cynthia Wolfe produced, wrote and edited the episode with assistance from Doug Storm, Robert Shull and Sarah Torbeck. Special thanks to Community Access Television Services for production support.

Executive producer: Joe Crawford
Theme music: The Impossible Shapes

bloomingOUT – March 5, 2015

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Tonight, hosts Erica Dorsey, Jeff Poling, and Ryne Shadday discuss recent news in the LGBTQ community about marriage equality, as well as groundbreaking news in the media of ABC network’s television show The Fosters. We also interviewed Emily Brinegar, a Prevention Coordinator at IU Health Bloomington, to discuss the Bloomington AID Walk 2015. She is joined by Patrick Battani who is their social media coordinator. This year the walk is on April 10th 2015. We also heard our weekly segment, Out on Campus. This week, we hear the first part of Arielle Soussan’s conversation with Frankie Salzman about his time at the Midwestern Bi Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference. This week, the two talk about the importance of queer spaces. Our music for tonight was by King Britt a.k.a. Fhloston Paradigm Feat. Pia Ercole, “Ave Maria.” We would like to thank our guests tonight, Emily Brinegar and Patrick Battani, for joining us.

Credits
Executive Producer Joe Crawford
Producer Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator Hayley Bass
Board Engineer Carissa Barrett

IN Nature – Hudsonian Godwit

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IN Nature – Pied-billed Grebe

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