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Tag Archives: racism

Kite Line: December 30, 2016- Spaces of Exception; Resilience in Prisons and on Reservations

This week, we explore various spaces of exception. We spoke with Matt Peterson, a documentary filmmaker and contributor to a multimedia project called the Native and the Refugee. Along with Malek Rasamny, he has worked in both native reservations and Palestinian refugee camps, drawing links between each as spaces of exception, excluded from the national constitutional order, but also drawing …

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Kite Line: December 16, 2016 – Community Policing

This week, we are sharing a conversation we had with Kristian Williams, author of Our Enemies in Blue and American Methods: Torture and the Logic of Domination. Kristian spoke at IU earlier this month on the history of policing in America, but we were eager to pick his brain about the intersections of police, racism, and prisons. He argues that …

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Interchange – The Wages of Whiteness: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Color Line

Think of it this way, W. E. B. Du Bois, born in February 1868, that’s 3 years after the end of the American Civil War, two years after Melville’s volume of Civil War poetry, Battle Pieces, died in August 1963, at 95, the year John F. Kennedy is assassinated, the year Medgar Evers is assassinated, and the day before Martin Luther King, Jr. …

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Interchange – Scapegoating Our Cities

Blue dots in a sea of red. The electoral map presents a distorted picture belying where most of the country’s population lives, and where the most privation occurs. A survey of the landscape in the wake of Donald Trump’s election reveals that America’s urban/rural drift has cemented into a chasm. Though commonly conflated with only economic elites, those blue dots …

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Interchange – Unfounded America: Taking Out the Myth with the Trash

For “Unfounded America” we’re joined by Nancy Isenberg author of the popular and provocative new book, White Trash: The 400-year Untold Story of Class in America. Laura Miller writes of the book in Salon: Tapping into scores of sources, Isenberg traces the emergence of the white-trash stereotype from its roots in British beliefs that the working class was truly a …

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Interchange – Focus on Apartheid: The Photojournalism of Margaret Bourke-White

As a photographer for Life and Fortune magazines, Margaret Bourke-White traveled to Russia in the 1930s, photographed the Nazi takeover of Czechoslovakia in 1938, recorded the liberation of Buchenwald a the end of World War II, and documented “Calcutta streets strewn with putrefying corpses decaying in the heat and being consumed by bloated vultures” in the aftermath of the 1946 …

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Islamic Center of Bloomington Fights Growing Anti-Muslim Sentiment

The mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando has again brought anti-Muslim sentiment to the fore in mainstream and social media, as well as from major politicians like Donald Trump. The shooter in Orlando was a practicing Muslim and reportedly told 911 dispatchers that he was carrying out the attack on behalf of the leader of the Islamic State. …

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Interchange – Racist Revolutionaries: The Alt-Right Uprising?

Our opening song for this program, “Racist Revolutionaries,” is a counter-statement: “Money Jungle” from three greats of Jazz, Duke Ellington, Max Roach, Charles Mingus. As has come to be “SOP” here, we like to choose music illustrative of our program; sometimes this comes from a sideways angle, but it’s usually fairly direct that the music reflects the content. For this …

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Interchange – “No Excuses” Schools: Broken Windows Theory Goes to School

I’m joined by author and educator Jim Horn to discuss his latest book, Work Hard, Be Hard: Journeys Through No Excuses Teaching. Horn explores the ideological contexts for the creation and spread of “no excuses” charter schools with a primary focus on the Knowledge Is Power Program or KIPP. “No Excuses” means schooling that focuses on psychological interventions aimed to …

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Interchange – Louis Farrakhan: The Last Radical Conservative

Louis Farrakhan, Black Lives Matter, and the future of black political leadership in the United States. I speak with Freddie deBoer about his Harper’s Monthly article “The Charmer” and the way Farrakhan’s “Million Man March” served as both a show of force and an example of resistance and separation from white America, prefiguring both the Occupy Wall Street and Black …

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