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Tag Archives: racism

Interchange – Louis Farrakhan: The Last Radical Conservative

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Louis Farrakhan, Black Lives Matter, and the future of black political leadership in the United States. I speak with Freddie deBoer about his Harper’s Monthly article “The Charmer” and the way Farrakhan’s “Million Man March” served as both a show of force and an example of resistance and separation from white America, prefiguring both the Occupy Wall Street and Black …

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Interchange – Tracking Subversives: Alan Wald On the Development of the Literary Left

Alan Wald (2011)

According to or my guest, Alan Wald, the aim of the literary radical is “to endow history with meaning.” Literary radicalism is less a noun than a verb….It’s a work in progress, an evolving tradition of activism and commitment obsessed with its own identity. Its orders, its achievements, its efficacy.* We track three “subversives” in our program and offer their …

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Interchange – The United States of Apartheid: Gerald Horne On the White Supremacist Project

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For tonight’s show, “The United States of Apartheid,” we welcome Gerald Horne. It would be something of an understatement to call Gerald Horne a prolific author; he has more than 30 books and over 100 scholarly articles to his credit. The Wikipedia entry describes his work further: While many of Horne’s books use a celebrated, intriguing or politically engaged individual …

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Interchange – Targeting the Vulnerable: Charter Legislation and Urban School Districts

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This conversation was excerpted for the program, “Darker than Blue: The Failure of School Integration.” This is the full conversation between Interchange host Doug Storm and Joe Johnston, an assistant professor of sociology at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington, who earned his doctorate at Indiana University in Bloomington studying how and why Kentucky has not enacted any state charter laws …

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Interchange – Darker Than Blue: The Failure of School Integration

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“Darker Than Blue” is in three parts. The first is an excerpt of a conversation I had with with Joe Johnston, an assistant professor of sociology at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington, who earned his PhD at Indiana University in Bloomington studying how and why Kentucky has not enacted any state charter laws in education. He studies Jefferson County schools …

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Interchange – Mixed Nuts: Clint Eastwood’s Life In the Movies

Publicity photo for Rawhide, 1961

In a 2002 interview Patrick McGilligan said of Clint Eastwood, “I think he’s a lazy actor and a lazy director. He’s a great image. This book is about how the image and the reality complement each other. There’s a false morality about Clint, the false morality of his life, which becomes the false morality of his films. It’s a disgusting …

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Interchange – Orson Around: In Conversation with Jonathan Rosenbaum and James Naremore

Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, March 1, 1937.

Tonight’s program “Orson Around,” is a glimpse at the life and movies of Orson Welles. This conversation took place in the breakfast room at the Grant Street Inn in Bloomington earlier in the year during the week that Indiana University hosted a Welles Symposium to celebrate his centenary. Yes, Orson Welles was born 100 years ago. But he still seems …

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Interchange – What Makes Us Vulnerable: The Essential Ellen Willis

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Our topic for the next hour is the cultural and critical writing of Ellen Willis who was the New Yorker‘s first rock critic and the cofounder of the radical feminist group the Redstockings. Her essays have been described as always unsettling, combining passion and moral clarity, espresso for the feminist soul, and relevant as ever, with a continuing influence on …

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Interchange – Shadows Are Black: Slavery’s Long Setting

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Tonight’s show, Shadows are Black: Slavery’s Long Setting, features a discussion on the text and context of Herman Melville’s 1855 novella “Benito Cereno.” “Benito Cereno” is clearly about slavery; but it also seems a deep meditation on the limits of the mind; on the ignorance of other ways to be minded; on the commonality of humanness (for “good” or “bad”). …

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Books Unbound – “Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville, Part Three

“Benito Cereno” is based on the memoir of the real-life Captain Amasa Delano, who during his voyages in 1805 came upon a Spanish merchant-ship in distress. Melville preserves the main elements of the story—the ship is manned by a skeleton crew of Spaniards under the haggard and enigmatic captain Benito Cereno, and carries Africans for the slave trade—but provokes interpretation …

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