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Tag Archives: racism

From the Vault: Louis Agassiz with Christoph Irmscher

Interchange took a break this week. As a substitute, here’s a conversation with Christoph Irmscher about Louis Agassiz for your edification and your listening pleasure. This first aired on June 8, 2013 as part of the summer series The Custom House. Louis Agassiz, born in 1807 in Fribourg, Switzerland, came to the US in 1846 and very quickly became one …

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Kite Line- November 3, 2017: Appalachian Prison Resistance

This week, we speak with Lill, a resident of Whitesburg, Kentucky. Whitesburg is located in Letcher County the proposed home to a new federal prison to be built on a mountaintop removal site. We have previously covered the strong local organizing in Letcher County that had helped put a stop to this toxic proposal. In light of recent efforts by …

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Kite Line- October 20, 2017: The Rise of Mass Incarceration, Part Two

Our news this week focuses on the prisoners who are fighting California’s wildfires for as little as a dollar an hour while actually fighting fires. In total, about thirty-eight hundred male and female inmates are fighting fires in California. They constitute around thirteen percent of the state’s firefighters. Their low salaries save taxpayers a hundred twenty-four million dollars a year. …

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Kite Line- October 13, 2017: The Rise of Mass Incarceration, Part One

This week we share the first part of a lecture by Elizabeth Hinton delivered at IU on October 12.  In her talk, she traces the creation and rise of mass incarceration as a strategy of America’s ruling class.  Her historical research, which culminated in a book last year called “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime,” demonstrates …

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Kite Line- September 22, 2017: Fighting Words

This week, we have two contributions –one closer to home and one many more miles away- but both aim to describe an unfair relationship of power each contributor’s community faces. We first hear an essay from a prisoner in Southern Illinois, followed by a statement sent to us from a member of the community of the Mapuche people in Chile. …

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Kite Line- September 1, 2017: Lines Should Be Drawn- Ray Luc Levasseur on Fighting Jim Crow and Surviving Federal Supermax

Ray Luc Levasseur is a former underground participant in the United Freedom Front, which carried out a campaign of attacks from 1975-1984 against South African Apartheid and US intervention in Central America. He spent 13 years in solitary confinement after his capture. In the first episode of our series on Ray Luc’s experiences in prison and in struggle, he tells …

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Interchange – The Same Old Hate: The Reactionary Right Rides Again

A mass of torches in the darkness reveal faces full of rage — white, (mostly male) faces. Public violence and intimidation unmasking raw hateful prejudice and resurgent white supremacy. Is this the deep south of the 1920’s? No, it happened in a college town last weekend: Charlottesville, Virginia. Our show is about the Reactionary Right in the United States of America; …

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Bloomington Rallies To Support Victims of Charlottesville Terrorism

Organizations gathered at the Monroe County Courthouse yesterday in a show of solidarity for the victims of Saturday’s terrorist attack on counter protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia. White supremacists gathered in the historic college town to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, calling their event the ‘Unite the Right Free Speech Rally.’ After repeated clashes …

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Interchange – White Lies to Brown Women: The Disingenuous Feminism of the Right

Our opening song is “Lagi” by Aziza Brahim, and she provides all the music for the program. Lagi is Arabic and means Refugee–the song’s opening line is “Ever since I arrived in this world I have lived as a refugee.” In our show today with Sara Farris we’ll ask, what’s behind the right-wing demand for women’s rights in the context …

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Kite Line: May 26, 2017- The Death Penalty

The death penalty is the barest, most explicit aspect of state violence. Relatively few people are sentenced to death, and even fewer are actively, legally killed by the state but the death penalty persists as an assertion of the sovereign right to take life or to let live. This week on Kite Line, we’ll begin examining the history and experience …

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