WFHB
Home > Tag Archives: IU (page 3)

Tag Archives: IU

IU President McRobbie Announces Huge Media Digitization Initiative

Play

Earlier this week, Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie announced a comprehensive $15 million Media Preservation and Digitization Initiative. The Indiana University collections of video, recorded music and other media will be preserved and made accessible through an extensive digitization process.

Mark Land, Associate Vice President for Public Affairs, compliments the commitment to preserve the materials in digital format.

“Over the course of nearly 200 years of history, IU has accumulated a vast amount of material,” Land says, “Things that have scholarly or research importance. All of this material that has historical value will be preserved for future generations by digitizing them.”

According to Land, the proposed work is of a larger scale than that being done by any other universities. The plan is not only to preserve the material but also make it available to help support university research and education

“The plan is not only to digitize it but make it accessible for others and make it public,” Land says, “We have a history of being a leader in big data initiatives, from an IT perspective. We hope to have enough expertise to help other universities do the same thing.”

Land says the plans for the digitization have already been established. Many people throughout the university will help to decide what will be preserved, and the university information technology group will lead the digitization process.
The initiative will be funded with $15 million over the next five years. The money will come in equal parts of the president’s office, the Office of Research Administration, and IU Bloomington’s Provost office.

Strike Mic – October 1, 2013

Play

A group of Indiana University Students have been meeting in the IU Memorial Union every Monday evening for more than a year, and became crucial in the action that led to the IU Student Strike this spring.

The demonstration to the IU Board of Trustees represented dissent for IU employment practices, tuition increases, and the current lack of minority representation on campus.

The group still meets weekly, and today WFHB launches our first on-location report of the resistance to IU’s administrative actions.

This is The Strike Mic, on WFHB.

Tune in to the Daily Local News every Tuesday for a new edition of The Strike Mic, a weekly update from your friends and neighbors working to strengthen the voice of Indiana University students and staff.

 

 

Daily Local News – September 27, 2013

Play

Chad Roeder explains what led him to close the downtown recycling center temporarily; The United Way Campaign Kick-Off began fundraising today with a picnic at IU Memorial Stadium; At a meeting on Monday the Bloomington Utilities Service Board heard an update from the company it hired to study the expenses of the Utilities Department; The Association of Indiana Counties announced Wednesday that Monroe County received the 2013 Local Government Cooperation Award.

FEATURE
The Anonymous People
Local organizations that provide support for those with substance abuse addictions have come together to create the documentary film “The Anonymous People to Bloomington.” WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh speaks with Kris Roehling  and Jill Matheny-Fuqua, both currently in recovery themselves, about the grassroots effort to bring the film to town, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive. Information about tickets is available at the following website: http://gathr.us/screening/5351.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Allison Schroeder and Yin Yuan,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh,
Volunteer Connection is produced by Ilze Ackerbergs, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer is Harrison Wagner,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

IU Ranks 11th Nationwide For Female Enrollment in STEM Programs

Play

Indiana University now ranks eleventh in the United States for female enrollment in science, technology, and math programs, according to The College Database.

IU also places second among Big Ten universities for women enrolled in the so-called hard sciences, or STEM programs.

The Bloomington campus has 90 STEM programs, with 1,288  women enrolled, or 51 percent of the total enrollment in those programs.

IU tries to help women in STEM programs succeed in teaching, research, and professional development.

In addition to the Center of Excellence for Women in Technology, IU offers the Provost’s Professional Development Awards for Women in Science, and provides a Women In Science, Technology, and Math Student Residential Community.

Julianne Martin is the Provost’s Program Coordinator for the designated living center for women in science.

“A big reason we wanted to start a residential learning community for women in STEM fields was to help provide support for women in those fields,” Martin says, “They get be surrounded by peers studying the same things, in the same classes and have the same academic goals.”

STEM programs are defined by The College Database using guidelines provided by National Science Foundation for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

The Bloomington campus has no engineering school, but does have one of the nation’s largest informatics and computing schools, so it classifies its programs using the STEM acronym.

IU Provost Lauren Robel says the university has made a focused and deliberate effort to attract women to the sciences. She adds that IU is becoming a beacon for women in these fields.

Martin says the old stereotype of science and math being male-only fields is gradually fading away.

“Some fields are better than others, like biology, with female enrollment,” Martin says, “But fields like astronomy, math and physics have much lower numbers. As you go up the academic ladder even into the careers the numbers just get smaller and smaller. So hopefully with these programs we can help women stay in these majors as undergrads and go on to careers in these fields.”

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that jobs in the STEM fields will grow at twice the rate of other fields in the coming years.

IU Physicists Win $5.4 Million Grant To Study Subatomic Particles

Play

An Indiana University team of physicists has won a three year, $5.4 million National Science Foundation award to continue its study of the inner workings of the atom’s nucleus.

The members of the team, several dozen strong, are affiliated with IU’s Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter.

IU physicists have already helped researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory study how minute particles called gluons contribute to the angular momentum of protons.

With this new grant, the IU team will continue to help the effort to learn about the composition and movement of the most elementary particles known to humankind.

Gluons hold quarks together in an atom’s proton. Quarks and gluons are among the smallest things particle physicists have identified. Gluons are so tiny that they are considered massless, actually measured in the billionths of a millimeter.

The IU team also will aid researchers at Fermilab in the search for new types of neutrinos, which are subatomic particles created by nuclear reactions in the sun.

Study of these potential new neutrinos may well affect cosmologist’s estimate of the expansion rate of the early universe.

The IU team includes physics department members Will Jacobs, Lisa Kaufman, Chen-yu Liu, Josh Long, Hans-Otto Meyer, Hermann Nann, William Snow, Ed Stephenson, Anselm Vossen, and Scott Wissink, as well as several post doctorates, graduate students, and undergrads.

 

Citizens show support for 8th Street’s historic homes

Play

This week the Bloomington City Council heard from residents who are unhappy with plans to demolish six historic houses on West 8th Street to make way for a fraternity house. The council doesn’t hold power to regulate the properties, which are owned by Indiana University. But Council member Steve Volan said he was glad to see the group of concerned citizens. IU announced its plans to demolish the historic houses and sell the vacant lot to the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

“I’m really angry at the Fiji house – and this is really about power and money” said

Sandy Cole, who lives about two blocks from the proposed fraternity house. Speakers also took aim at IU for agreeing to the deal. Because of IU’s status as a state institution, it is not subject to the same city ordinances that could make it difficult for the fraternity to demolish the houses on its own. Melissa Cox-Ash said the houses are important elements of a well-preserved historic district.

Although the city government is not involved in the deal, speaker Micol Siegel said the demolition of historic houses fits with other recent developments in the city. She said Bloomington is increasingly catering to affluent students. The Bloomington Historic Preservation Commission has written a letter to IU in opposition to the project, but so far the university has said it plans to move forward with the sale.

IU GLBT Alumni Association Launches Groundbreaking Scholarship Campaign Helping The LGBT Student Community

Play

The Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Alumni Association has launched the nation’s first-ever scholarship campaign devoted to assisting GLBT students and promoting leadership on GLBT concerns.

According to Doug Bauder, coordinator at the IU GLBT Student Support Services Office, the GLBT Alumni Association organized this dual scholarship.

One of the scholarships aims to help GLBT students who are cut off financially after coming out about their sexual orientation.

“If they choose to share that with their parents, and on occasion, these folks have lost support, financially,” Bauder says, “I became aware of that when students would share that with me and as I met with people in the alumni association, we came up with ways to provide them some scholarship money.”

Bauder says the campaign has been under development for over a decade, and that IU leading the way is no surprise.

“There’s been an appreciation of issues of sexual diversity since the days of Alfred Kinsey,” Bauder says, “There’s a tradition and a history of this community and this campus of understanding that not everyone is heterosexual. There are unique problems gay students face and this office opened 20 years ago to offer information and support to gay students. From the very first year our office was open, we’ve had alumni say they wish it had been open when they were in school in the 50’s or 60’s or 70’s.”

Full or part-time students enrolled at any IU campus may apply for the scholarships, which are awarded based on involvement in activities promoting diversity and raising awareness of GLBT issues.

Daily Local News – September 6, 2013

Play

The USDA released their latest report: Household Food Security in the United States in 2012; On September 4th the Monroe County Board of Zoning Appeals gave permission to build a house on a lot that is smaller than allowed by County ordinances; The documentary “Black Gold” will be showing at the IU cinema this weekend, hosted by Fair Trade Bloomington.

FEATURE
HIP Changes
Indiana Governor Mike Pence has turned down incoming Affordable Care Act funds in exchange for extending the current Healthy Indiana Plan through December 2014. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh has the story, for today’s Daily Local News feature exclusive.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television Services
Volunteer Connection was produced by Ilze Ackerbergs,  in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Harrison Wagner is our broadcast engineer
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

IU Kicks Off The Football Season Against Indiana State

Play

The Indiana Hoosiers take to the field Thursday in Memorial Stadium for the opening game of their 2013 football season. The home opener is cause for an annual celebration, but the convergence of some 40,000 people on the stadium can lead to headaches for neighbors and local residents.

We spoke with Indiana University Police Lieutenant Craig Munroe this afternoon just before he left to help coordinate street coverage for the game. He says officers will be positioned at every intersection in the vicinity of the stadium to help manage traffic flow.

“They need to be concerned about traffic on the northside, 17th street and pregame traffic starts around 5 o’ clock. We think we’ll be done around 11pm,” Munroe says.

Technically, IU is a “dry campus” although alcoholic drinks are commonly served at various functions and events.

The parking lots surrounding Memorial Stadium typically teem with tailgaiters in the hours prior to a football game, and it’s an open secret that beer, wine, and spirits flow freely.

Football fans may be particularly thirsty tonight after temperatures soared to near 90 today.

The IUPD will be keeping a close eye on the festivities.

“If the tailgaiting is low key, we don’t pester anybody. If they’re having a huge party, we might have to deal with that,” Munroe said.
Students shouldn’t interpret  this relaxed attitude to mean they can wander the streets with beers in their hands.

Munroe says if IUPD officers see anyone drinking on a public way  “they can definitely be approached for that.”

The Hoosiers take on the Indiana State Sycamores tonight and come right back to Memorial Stadium for their next game, Saturday, September 7th, against Navy.

 

IU Anthropologists Will Try Raising Funds Online For Research Project

Play

Four anthropology students from Indiana University are taking their funding request to the public. Crowd-funding websites like Kickstarter are becoming more and more popular as a way to fund all kinds of projects, big and small.

This group, studying in the lab of evolutionary anthropologist Michael Muehlenbein hopes to continue their study of how tourists and primates interact in South Africa by using these types of funds.

“The whole idea of ecotourism is that you take only photos and leave only footprints. But the reality is that unregulated ecotourism can have a variety of potential costs. One of those costs being the welfare of endangered species that we’re interested in going to visit,” Muehlenbein says.

Diseases transmitted from humans to primates can be disastrous to wild primate populations. Primates can transmit diseases like malaria right back to humans. The goal for these researchers is to study what people know about primate and human diseases and their attitudes towards them. These and other factors can influence disease transmission.

“Humans are attracted to monkeys and apes, they’re cute, they’re fuzzy and they act like us. Non-human primates share a lot of diseases with humans and we know there are a lot of instances of disease transmission from them to humans, HIV being a good example. So, I wanted to wrap my brain around the decisions tourists make that might influence the transmission of diseases like that,” Muehlenbein says.

The students helping Muehlenbein in his research hope to reach out to the community by involving them in the funding and researching process. They plan on using Microryza, a website dedicated to helping smaller science projects reach their funding goals.

Muehlenbein thinks that becoming involved in this kind of research project could mean so much to the science community.

“I think a lot of younger people are not as involved in science as they should be. In general, I think the public loves celebrities, but I think they should love scientists just as much. As a donor, they have an investment more than just money because we have multiple incentives. We want to involve them every step of the way, telling them why we’re doing this, from the inception of the project to the very end,” Muehlenbein says.

The goal is to raise $7,500  to pay for plane tickets and the research would  take about three weeks.

 

By Casey Kuhn

Scroll To Top