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Tag Archives: IU

Citizens show support for 8th Street’s historic homes

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This week the Bloomington City Council heard from residents who are unhappy with plans to demolish six historic houses on West 8th Street to make way for a fraternity house. The council doesn’t hold power to regulate the properties, which are owned by Indiana University. But Council member Steve Volan said he was glad to see the group of concerned citizens. IU announced its plans to demolish the historic houses and sell the vacant lot to the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

“I’m really angry at the Fiji house – and this is really about power and money” said

Sandy Cole, who lives about two blocks from the proposed fraternity house. Speakers also took aim at IU for agreeing to the deal. Because of IU’s status as a state institution, it is not subject to the same city ordinances that could make it difficult for the fraternity to demolish the houses on its own. Melissa Cox-Ash said the houses are important elements of a well-preserved historic district.

Although the city government is not involved in the deal, speaker Micol Siegel said the demolition of historic houses fits with other recent developments in the city. She said Bloomington is increasingly catering to affluent students. The Bloomington Historic Preservation Commission has written a letter to IU in opposition to the project, but so far the university has said it plans to move forward with the sale.

IU GLBT Alumni Association Launches Groundbreaking Scholarship Campaign Helping The LGBT Student Community

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The Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Alumni Association has launched the nation’s first-ever scholarship campaign devoted to assisting GLBT students and promoting leadership on GLBT concerns.

According to Doug Bauder, coordinator at the IU GLBT Student Support Services Office, the GLBT Alumni Association organized this dual scholarship.

One of the scholarships aims to help GLBT students who are cut off financially after coming out about their sexual orientation.

“If they choose to share that with their parents, and on occasion, these folks have lost support, financially,” Bauder says, “I became aware of that when students would share that with me and as I met with people in the alumni association, we came up with ways to provide them some scholarship money.”

Bauder says the campaign has been under development for over a decade, and that IU leading the way is no surprise.

“There’s been an appreciation of issues of sexual diversity since the days of Alfred Kinsey,” Bauder says, “There’s a tradition and a history of this community and this campus of understanding that not everyone is heterosexual. There are unique problems gay students face and this office opened 20 years ago to offer information and support to gay students. From the very first year our office was open, we’ve had alumni say they wish it had been open when they were in school in the 50’s or 60’s or 70’s.”

Full or part-time students enrolled at any IU campus may apply for the scholarships, which are awarded based on involvement in activities promoting diversity and raising awareness of GLBT issues.

Daily Local News – September 6, 2013

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The USDA released their latest report: Household Food Security in the United States in 2012; On September 4th the Monroe County Board of Zoning Appeals gave permission to build a house on a lot that is smaller than allowed by County ordinances; The documentary “Black Gold” will be showing at the IU cinema this weekend, hosted by Fair Trade Bloomington.

FEATURE
HIP Changes
Indiana Governor Mike Pence has turned down incoming Affordable Care Act funds in exchange for extending the current Healthy Indiana Plan through December 2014. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh has the story, for today’s Daily Local News feature exclusive.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television Services
Volunteer Connection was produced by Ilze Ackerbergs,  in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Harrison Wagner is our broadcast engineer
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

IU Kicks Off The Football Season Against Indiana State

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The Indiana Hoosiers take to the field Thursday in Memorial Stadium for the opening game of their 2013 football season. The home opener is cause for an annual celebration, but the convergence of some 40,000 people on the stadium can lead to headaches for neighbors and local residents.

We spoke with Indiana University Police Lieutenant Craig Munroe this afternoon just before he left to help coordinate street coverage for the game. He says officers will be positioned at every intersection in the vicinity of the stadium to help manage traffic flow.

“They need to be concerned about traffic on the northside, 17th street and pregame traffic starts around 5 o’ clock. We think we’ll be done around 11pm,” Munroe says.

Technically, IU is a “dry campus” although alcoholic drinks are commonly served at various functions and events.

The parking lots surrounding Memorial Stadium typically teem with tailgaiters in the hours prior to a football game, and it’s an open secret that beer, wine, and spirits flow freely.

Football fans may be particularly thirsty tonight after temperatures soared to near 90 today.

The IUPD will be keeping a close eye on the festivities.

“If the tailgaiting is low key, we don’t pester anybody. If they’re having a huge party, we might have to deal with that,” Munroe said.
Students shouldn’t interpret  this relaxed attitude to mean they can wander the streets with beers in their hands.

Munroe says if IUPD officers see anyone drinking on a public way  “they can definitely be approached for that.”

The Hoosiers take on the Indiana State Sycamores tonight and come right back to Memorial Stadium for their next game, Saturday, September 7th, against Navy.

 

IU Anthropologists Will Try Raising Funds Online For Research Project

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Four anthropology students from Indiana University are taking their funding request to the public. Crowd-funding websites like Kickstarter are becoming more and more popular as a way to fund all kinds of projects, big and small.

This group, studying in the lab of evolutionary anthropologist Michael Muehlenbein hopes to continue their study of how tourists and primates interact in South Africa by using these types of funds.

“The whole idea of ecotourism is that you take only photos and leave only footprints. But the reality is that unregulated ecotourism can have a variety of potential costs. One of those costs being the welfare of endangered species that we’re interested in going to visit,” Muehlenbein says.

Diseases transmitted from humans to primates can be disastrous to wild primate populations. Primates can transmit diseases like malaria right back to humans. The goal for these researchers is to study what people know about primate and human diseases and their attitudes towards them. These and other factors can influence disease transmission.

“Humans are attracted to monkeys and apes, they’re cute, they’re fuzzy and they act like us. Non-human primates share a lot of diseases with humans and we know there are a lot of instances of disease transmission from them to humans, HIV being a good example. So, I wanted to wrap my brain around the decisions tourists make that might influence the transmission of diseases like that,” Muehlenbein says.

The students helping Muehlenbein in his research hope to reach out to the community by involving them in the funding and researching process. They plan on using Microryza, a website dedicated to helping smaller science projects reach their funding goals.

Muehlenbein thinks that becoming involved in this kind of research project could mean so much to the science community.

“I think a lot of younger people are not as involved in science as they should be. In general, I think the public loves celebrities, but I think they should love scientists just as much. As a donor, they have an investment more than just money because we have multiple incentives. We want to involve them every step of the way, telling them why we’re doing this, from the inception of the project to the very end,” Muehlenbein says.

The goal is to raise $7,500  to pay for plane tickets and the research would  take about three weeks.

 

By Casey Kuhn

Voices In the Street – Freshman Frenzy: Move-In Day at IU

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Bloomington got an instant ten percent population boost yesterday as more than seven thousand freshmen arrived in town, the second-largest freshmen class ever at IU.  The first day of college is an exciting time in a young person’s life, so Voices in the Street ventured onto campus to talk to the newbies.  So freshmen, why Bloomington?  What are your hopes and aspirations, and what are you most excited about as you begin your college career?

Cate takes stand against government data collection

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IU 1 smallBy Kat Carlton

IU Law Professor Fred Cate is taking a stand against a court order that allowed the government to collect telephone data from Verizon Communications. Professor Fred Cate, along with a group of other law experts, filed an amicus brief curiae The brief supports of a motion to strike down the order, which came out of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. While some argue this is a violation of privacy, Cate’s argument is focused more on the order being a violation of the law itself—more specifically, the Fourth Amendment. Cate says this sends a message that there’s no protection from the government obtaining information from citizens. He says this is a problem because the Fourth Amendment was specifically designed to limit government access to data like this. In addition, he thinks people are misguided when they argue the government needs access to this kind of information.

 

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