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Interchange – Steve Arnold and Marcia Veldman: Citizen Lobbyists

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This week on Interchange, host Lisa-Marie Napoli interviews Steve Arnold, Volunteer Group Leader of the Bloomington Global Chapter of RESULTS, and Marcia Veldman, Co-Leader of the Bloomington Chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby. The guests discuss each of their corresponding non-partisan citizens lobby groups in several ways: how they came to be; the issues they address and other aspects of their local, state and national efforts. Arnold and Veldman acknowledge that both RESULTS and the Citizens Climate Lobby use similar methodologies that train citizens to gain specific skills to develop political will, personal empowerment and effective lobbying efforts.

Interchange – Toby Strout: Domestic Violence Awareness

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This week on Interchange, host Joe Crawford discusses domestic violence with Toby Strout, the executive director of Middle Way House. Strout talks about the interpersonal and structural causes of domestic violence and how it intersects with other societal issues. She also outlines the services offered by Middle Way House and how victims can seek help from the organization.

Interchange – Laura Reagan: Columbus Day

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This week on Interchange, host Louis Malone IV discusses Christopher Columbus and the Federal Holiday Columbus Day.  Ms. Reagan is a local activist, IU graduate student, and is a former officer in the Natvie American Community Center of Bloomington.  During the discussion, the guest discusses the truth and the myth of historical Columbus, the origin of the Federal holiday, and the state of Columbus as an American icon today.

Interchange – Professor Kevin Howley: What is Community Media?

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WFHB’s Interchange welcomes DePauw University professor Kevin Howley for an exclusive interview.

Interchange – Vic Smith, Phil Harris, and Gary Crow: The State of Education in Indiana

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This week on Interchange, host Doug Storm discusses the state of education in Indiana with Vic Smith, Board President of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education; Phil Harris, co-author of The Myths of Standardized Testing with Bruce Smith and Joan Harris, and Executive Director of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology; and Gary Crow, a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

Our topics will include the coercive economics of educational products corporations like Pearson Education, the funding of charter schools by foundations like the Lilly Endowment which have tremendous reach by placing employees in government to influence public policy, and the role the school used to play, ought to play, but no longer does, in developing a democratic citizen.

Discussed in the program:

Christoph Irmscher: Against Complacency: Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience”

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This week on Interchange, host Doug Storm speaks with Christoph Irmscher, Provost Professor of English at Indiana University, about Henry David Thoreau’s influential essay, “Civil Disobedience.” Doug reads selections from the text that Irmscher explicates. The crux of the vitality and urgency of Thoreau’s language lives in his assertions to stand as a person with a conscience, to cultivate a moral sense.

Also of Interest: Interviews with Christoph Irmscher on The Custom House:
http://archive.wfhb.org/news/custom-house-banality-pest-control-extended-conversation-wlisa-sideris-and-christoph-irmscher

http://archive.wfhb.org/news/custom-house-agassiz-inc-extended-conversation-wchristoph-irmscher

Interchange – Tim Lovelace and Eileen Braman: Constitution Day

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This week on Interchange, host Lisa-Marie Napoli, a member of the PACE [Political and Civic Engagement] faculty, interviews Tim Lovelace from the Maurer School of Law and Eileen Braman from Political Science Department about this foundational and essential, yet little-known document.

Did YOU know there was a U.S. holiday called “Constitution Day”?

A law establishing “Constitution Day” was created in 2004 with the passage of an amendment by Senator Robert Byrd to the Omnibus spending bill of 2004. Before this law was enacted, the holiday was known as “Citizenship Day”. In addition to renaming the holiday “Constitution Day and Citizenship Day,” the act mandates that all publicly funded educational institutions provide educational programming on the history of the American Constitution on that day.  [Source: Wikipedia]

This week on Interchange, host Lisa-Marie Napoli, a member of the PACE [Political and Civic Engagement] faculty, interviews Tim Lovelace from the Maurer School of Law and Eileen Braman from Political Science Department about this foundational and essential, yet little-known document.

Interchange – Rahaf Safi and Shadi Alkattan: Understanding Syria

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This week on Interchange, host Joe Crawford speaks with Rahaf Safi and Shadi Alkattan, both Syrian Americans who are also college students living in Bloomington. Safi and Alkattan discuss their past experiences visiting family and friends in Syria as well as what they have seen and heard about the government under President Bashar al-Assad. They also talk about the effects of the civil war on the ground in Syria and why some are calling for an international intervention in the conflict.

Interchange – Choctaw Academy: Educating the Vanquished

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This week on Interchange, host Doug Storm speaks with Christina Snyder, an associate professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at Indiana University. Snyder’s scholarship focuses on Native North America and on the histories of colonialism and slavery.  She is the author of Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America.  Snyder instructs us about Choctaw Academy, the first national Indian boarding school in the United States. Open from 1825 to 1848, the school was located on the plantation of prominent politician Richard Mentor Johnson. During Choctaw Academy’s lifespan, the United States transitioned from an east-coast nation to a continental power. The story of Choctaw Academy reveals how the emerging U.S. empire developed a tandem approach, violence and acculturation, to exert economic, political, and cultural influence far beyond even its extensive territory, and the complex ways in which colonized people met these challenges.

Interchange – James Capshew: Herman B. Wells and The Promise of the American University

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This week on Interchange, host Trish Kerle’ speaks with Jim Capshew, IU associate professor and author of a biography of the late President and Chancellor of Indiana University, Herman B. Wells.  Capshew speaks about Wells’ personality and leadership style, his time as a student, Dean of the business school, President and Chancellor at IU and his legacy and contributions to IU, Bloomington, and higher education.

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