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Interchange

In-depth interviews and conversations
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Interchange – The Whole World Is Watching: The Legacy of 1968

Our opening song is “Inflated Tear” by Roland Kirk performed in Prague in 1967…a prelude of sorts of what was to come. Across the globe it was a year of countless uprisings. In the US it was the year of police violence against protesters at the Chicago Democratic Convention; it saw the Vietnam War’s Tet Offensive, the assassinations of Martin …

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Interchange – Freedom to Exit: The Libertarian Use of Market Ideology

Today we discuss the ideology of market egalitarianism and versions of libertarianism from the Levellers in 17th century England through Adam Smith’s “Invisible Hand” and Tom Paine’s Rights of Man and on to Lincoln’s political argument to poor whites that wage labor was slave labor and a man should instead stand on his own two feet on his own plot …

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Interchange – The Political Prisoner in the Modern World

“You have done nothing wrong — though to be honest perhaps that’s a matter of perspective. You marched in a demonstration, or you attended a meeting, or you wrote an essay that appeared in an underground journal, or you merely possessed a copy of that journal. Or maybe you really did break the law. You planted a bomb, carried a …

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Interchange – Storied States: James Scott’s Against the Grain

EXTENDED TAKE (Radio Cut below) Today’s show is Storied States and is something of “counter-companion” to last week’s program, Storied Into Being, with Anthology Editor and Literature professor Martin Puchner. That show followed the stories which accompanied writing technology on its roughly 5,000 year journey from the accountants of ancient Mesopotamia (which means between two rivers) to the entrepreneurship of …

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Interchange – Storied Into Being: Martin Puchner On the Written World

From Alexander the Great’s “pillow book” (The Iliad) to the Mayan Popul Vuh; from Gilgamesh to Harry Potter by way of Goethe and the notion of “world literature”–tonight we contemplate The Written World. World Literature is a concept first expressed by Johann Wolfgang Goethe in 1827: If we Germans do not look beyond the narrow circle of our own environment, …

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Interchange – Facing Down the Past: The White South Shakes Its Whip

Today we’ll excerpt a 1999 Interchange episode in which host Shana Ritter interviews Elizabeth Eckford, one of the Little Rock Nine, and Hazel Bryan Massery, the white student made infamous in photographs which capture her hatefully screaming at Eckford. The two are joined by the man who took those photos, Will Counts. Captured in Count’s photo, which is one of …

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Interchange – The New Cosmology or Upbeat in the Anthropocene

Or Big History, or, Epic Science, or Religion 2.0…Today’s show is kin to last week’s, Honey From a Weed…but instead of seeing the human as capable of flourishing in concert with the natural, in this story, humanity sings itself beyond limitation. “[T]he new cosmologists attempt to recast the universe as a distinctly human drama, a story in which we comfortably …

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Interchange – Honey From a Weed: The Life of Patience Gray

As we’re in the midst of a holiday season that can so often feel like merely a smattering of one-off charitable acts and token expressions of fellow-feeling paired with culturally enforced gluttony, it seemed appropriate to turn to a different kind of life, one which defines fasting and feasting in much different terms. As the sweet gives to salt it’s …

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From the Vault: Louis Agassiz with Christoph Irmscher

Interchange took a break this week. As a substitute, here’s a conversation with Christoph Irmscher about Louis Agassiz for your edification and your listening pleasure. This first aired on June 8, 2013 as part of the summer series The Custom House. Louis Agassiz, born in 1807 in Fribourg, Switzerland, came to the US in 1846 and very quickly became one …

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Interchange – Censorship and Sensibility: Story and First Person Provocation

“Censorship and Sensibility” features local author and film scholar Joan Hawkins in conversation with writer Laurie Stone. Stone was in town to read from her latest book as part of the Player’s Pub Spoken Word series organized by the Writers Guild at Bloomington. A longtime writer for the Village Voice, theater critic for The Nation and critic-at-large on Fresh Air, …

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