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Author Archives: WFHB Archivist

Ins and Outs of Money – Holiday Spending

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The holidays are here! This can be a budget-busting time of year if you aren’t careful. Ashley and Sarah will help you keep your holiday spending down with some useful and creative tips.

bloomingOUT – December 5, 2013

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Bloomington story teller Jim Doud relates a “Christmas Past” on an edition of “Our View” and Helen presents an historical review on an edition of Queer History entitled “Reflections.” Michael and Helen discuss the pros and cons of coming out over the holidays in response to a Q Mailbag question from a listener. President of the Mauer School of Law LGBT Alumni Advisory Board Mike Shumate discusses the organization, their issue oriented events and plans for future activities. Featured artist is Bay area based singer/songwriter Eli Conley. Musical selections are “Draw the Line” and “Now I’m Doing Me.”

www.eliconley.com

Produced Carol Fischer
Executive producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producers Sarah Hetrick and Nick Tumino’
News director Josh Vidrich,
Original theme music provided by Mikial Robertson
Announcer is Sarah Hetrick

Bring It On! – December 9, 2013

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Clarence Boone and Cornelius Wright joined Frank Motley of the IU Maurer School of Law and BIO contributor Liz Mitchell

PART ONE
Nelson Mandela passed away at the age of 95 on December 5, 2013. Though not a total surprise, the world was nevertheless saddened to learn of the recent passing of this legendary and iconic South African anti-apartheid leader and former President.

To commemorate his life, Bring It On welcomes contributor Liz Mitchell and Frank Motley from the IU Maurer School of Law to share their thoughts on Mandela’s recent passing.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Clarence Boone and Cornelius Wright
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Businesses Benefit, But Others Suffer From Local Tax Breaks

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Two studies released by Ball State University in recent weeks call into question a long-standing, and expensive, strategy that communities throughout the state have used in hopes of creating jobs. Monroe County and the city of Bloomington spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year on the strategy, which involves giving local tax breaks to companies that are new to town. Those companies, in turn, are expected to create new jobs, therefore decreasing the local unemployment rate and improving the local economy. But the study out of Ball State suggests the tax breaks for business are not creating many jobs, and they’re actually increasing the tax rates for regular taxpayers. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford spoke to one of the authors of the study, professor Michael Hicks, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Activate! – Be a Santa to a Senior: Joe Yonkman

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Joe Yonkman of Home Instead talks about the annual Be a Santa to a Senior program and the need for volunteers to gift wrap the over 2,000 presents donated for area seniors in need this year.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 4

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Volunteer Connection – December 6, 2013

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

Voices in the Street – “Merry Chirstmas” vs. “Happy Holidays”

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Our weekly public opinion segment asks Bloomington citizens “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays”?

Demonstrators Support McDonald’s Workers

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McDonald’s workers nationwide are asking for an increased minimum wage, to fifteen dollars an hour. Today workers went on strike in a reported one hundred cities around the country, and many other cities, including Bloomington, held demonstrations in solidarity with the workers. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh was on hand at a demonstration this afternoon, and brings us the story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

EcoReport – Ashley Cranor: Monroe Co. Energy Plan

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Ashley Cranor, grants administrator for the Monroe county government, discusses the County’s community energy plan and its implications for the community.

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