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Author Archives: WFHB Archivist

Hola Bloomington – March 7, 2014

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Hostess Prisma Lopez and Carlos Bakota interview Debbie Rincones form the Indiana Civil Rights Commission. The local news, sports, eco-report with Ramon Tristani and “Desde los pasillos”… with students from the Academy with Melissa Mitra and the events of the week.

Volunteer Connection – March 7, 2014

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 17

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Writer’s Showcase: Tony Brewer

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Tony Brewer is a poet, an author, and president of the Bloomington Storytellers Guild. Correspondent Michael Glab spoke with Brewer, and we’re bringing you highlights from that conversation for today’s WFHB feature report.

Daily Local News – March 6, 2014

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A bill that will increase recycling efforts in Indiana was passed on Tuesday; As Spring approaches, owners of shallow ponds and lakes will have to watch out for fish kills due to the accumulation of snow and ice this winter; The City of Bloomington Arts Commission has announced that revised guidelines and applications are available for the April Cycle of its 2014 Arts Project Grant Program; This weekend in local sports – Tonight the Indiana University Women’s Basketball team faces Michigan in the Big Ten Tournament at 6:30 pm—the tournament will continue through Sunday.

FEATURE
Tony Brewer is a poet, an author, and president of the Bloomington Storytellers Guild. Correspondent Michael Glab spoke with Brewer, and we’re bringing you highlights from that conversation for today’s WFHB feature report.

VOICES IN THE STREET
Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown. The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals. The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal yesterday, so how do you feel? Should we restrict what kinds of business can operate downtown?

CREDITS
Anchors: Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner and Jalisa Ransom,
Our feature was produced by Sarah Hetrick, with correspondent Michael Glab.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer today is Sarah Hetrick.
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Voices in the Street – McBloomington: Restricting Chain Stores Downtown

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown.  The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals.  The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal yesterday, so how do you feel?  Should we restrict what kinds of business can operate downtown?

EcoReport – Ralph Keeling: Scripps Institute

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Ralph Keeling, professor at the Scripps Institute at the University of California – San Diego, discusses problems related to global carbon levels and climate.

“Not So Fast” Food: Mayor Attempts Limits on New Downtown Chain Restaurants

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown. The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts of the downtown to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals. The city defines a standardized restaurant as one which is contractually required by a franchisor to offer standardized menus, ingredients, food preparation, uniforms, logos, or exterior design. Mayor Kruzan offers a hypothetical question to listeners, to justify his proposal.

There are eleven conditional use ordinance provisions for development standards that the Zoning Board can use to evaluate applications for such things as historic preservation, bed and breakfast businesses, some restaurants, and adult care and child care facilities, plus other regulations applying to signage, building height, density, and architectural standards. Mayor Kruzan says the homogenization of the character of downtown Bloomington is not in the community’s interests. He responds to anticipated critics of his proposal, and the expected argument that his proposal limits property owners rights and is an unwarranted intervention in the free market.

Mayor Kruzan says that most communities have development regulations that reflect the priorities of their respective community. Furthermore, the proposed regulations would only apply to two districts: courthouse square and restaurant row. The mayor acknowledges that the desire to make the downtown area and its restaurants unique is part of the larger promotion of the city’s art and entertainment offerings, reflected in the city’s recent designation of the downtown BEAD district. However, the proposed ordinance could not be applied to the BEAD, as it is not a legal district. Mayor Kruzan concluded by outlining the expected process and timeline for his proposal to become law.

The mayor says that there could be as many as six public hearings for the public to attend. The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal today, stating that the ordinance would restrict ‘standardized’ restaurants from locating in some portions of the downtown.

Brown County Hour – Episode #24

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Hosted by Dave Seastrom and Vera Grubbs.

First aired Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 9 AM on WFHB.

☆ In this episode of the Brown County Hour:

Vera Grubbs interviews artist Mary Pendergrass
WoodWatch segment: a report on a Meet Your Legislators meeting at the County Building regarding the DNR logging plan
Rich Reardin talks about the upcoming Brown County Playhouse concert and documentary on the life and music of Irish folksinger Eunan Mc Intyre
The Artist Colony Inn Players with a teaser for their ongoing murder mysteries
Poems by Rick Fettig and Gunther Flumm
Dave Seastrom with another pithy essay: Cabin Fever
And our Musical Guests: The Whipstitch Sallies.

✇ Theme music by Slats Klug & Friends.

Daily Local News – March 5, 2014

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown; The economic divide between the so-called one percent and the other ninety-nine has been growing across the country, and even more so in Indiana according to a new study from The Indiana Institute for Working Families; Republican Indiana State Senator Brandt Hershman is proposing an amendment to House Bill 1001 that would prohibit same-sex couples from filing a joint-tax-return.

FEATURE
Planned Neighborhood Development
The city council will meet tonight to discuss a proposal to re-zone a football-shaped area of land along the B-line trail on the north side of the downtown area between 9th and 11th streets. The proposal, brought the council by local non-profit Habitat for Humanity, is to re-zone the area from residential to “planned neighborhood development”, so that Habitat for Humanity can build a subdivision with 35 single family homes. Currently, the land, which is owned by habitat for humanity, is zoned so that 50% of the trees on the property can be removed, but if the proposal is approved, Habitat for Humanity would be allowed to remove up to 64% of the trees on the land. The proposal states that the 36% of the property that would be required to remain wooded would be near the B-line trail and the railroad that borders the other side of the property. The area was clear as recently as the 1960s and the oldest trees on the property are the ones near the edges, which the proposal plans to retain. At the last city council meeting, residents of the area spoke out against Habitat’s proposal for a variety of rationales, ranging from the ecology of the area, to the view from the b-line trail. WFHB Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Patrick Shay, development review manager for the city of Bloomington, and Martha Crouch, a resident of the neighborhood for 35 years, for today’s WFHB feature.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE
Scammers have reached a new low, by victimizing the neediest people – the homeless. So far, this frightening scheme is apparently NOT illegal — so it’s up to you to help spread the warning. That’s on a new edition of our consumer watchdog segment Bloomington Beware!

CREDITS
Anchors: Cathi Norton, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Neal Earley
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish with correspondent Anson Shupe
Lauren Glapa produced our feature.
Our engineer is Jim Lang,
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

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