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Author Archives: WFHB Archivist

Interchange – Big Data Is Watching You

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This week on Interchange host Doug Storm presents “Big Data Is Watching You,” a conversation with Colin Allen, Director of the Cognitive Science Program at Indiana University.  Allen is a philosopher of biology and cognitive science and he’s joined us once before on Interchange to talk about the possibilities of machine morality and perhaps rather the necessity of building morality into source codes.  If nothing else, this week’s program should make that at least clear, and clearly an imperative.  Of course we’re stuck with the question, who will craft this ethical code?

We also present here for podcast the unedited conversation which covers more ground and even attempts to explicate Yeats’s “Second Coming” (1919) as an ode to the coming of the Mind of Big Data.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

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Best of 2013 #7- Indiana stays HIP: the ACA & the Twenty-Nine Hour Work Week

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A source of national controversy and the impetus behind the October shutdown of the federal government, the ACA produced two big issues in Indiana. The creation of the 29-hour work week allowed employers to avoid providing health care benefits to part-time workers, and Indiana lawmakers refused to create an Indiana insurance exchange, rejected Federal Medicaid expansion monies, and chose to seek approval for the revamped Healthy Indiana Plan system as an alternative. As 2013 started, businesses, schools, and local governments began looking at ways to implement the requirements of the ACA, slated to go into effect at the beginning of 2014. As early as January, administrators were looking at ways to cut employee hours in order to avoid providing health insurance. Without employer coverage, many of these workers turned to the state, where Mike Pence’s refusal to create a state insurance exchange or to take part in ACA Medicaid expansion is expected to leave at least 400,000 people in poverty without the ability to get insurance even under an expanded Healthy Indiana Plan.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 6

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Hola Bloomington – December 20, 2013

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Hostess Johann Mercado and Sandra Santana bring us a special holiday program with Traditions of Christmas Eve and New Year’s from different countries of Latin America. Listen to all the different food being cooked and desserts from countries like Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, Chile and so on.

Listen to the events of the week and the segment of “Desde los pasillos.”  Merry Christmas!

Best of 2013 #8 – A Year of Government Dysfunction: The Sequester and the Shutdown

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One of the biggest national stories in 2013 was the continuing inability for the Federal Government to govern in a bi-partisan manner or in fact to govern at all. Beginning with the automatic cuts commonly referred to as the sequester in March as a result of the Budget Control Act of 2011 and reaching a breaking point with the October government shut down, political infighting, intransigence, and incompetence set the tone for 2013 and affected everyone from the inner circle in DC to the residents here in Monroe County.

CREDITS
The best of 2013 is a production of the WFHB news department.
Today’s episode was produced by Jennifer Whitaker. Correspondents David Murphy, Casey Kuhn, Producers Carolyn VandeWiele and Ilze Ackerbergs and WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford contributed to today’s reports.
Our theme music is provided by Legs
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

EcoReport – Myke Luurtsema: Hoosier Forest Watch

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Director Alycin Bektesh speaks with Myke Luurtsema of the Hoosier Forest Watch, and Indiana Forester John Seifert, about the logging currently happening in Indiana’s protected back county areas.

Best of 2013 #9 – Muddying the Waters: New Interstate Brings New Contamination

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After decades of debate and protest, 2013 saw the first segments of Interstate 69 begin construction in Monroe and Greene counties. In 2012, a 67-mile stretch of the new road was finished in Southern Indiana, connecting Evansville to the area near the Crane Naval base. Then, by early this spring, landowners in the WFHB listening area began reporting trees were cleared on or near their properties to make way for section 4 of the interstate. It was just a few months after that, that problems began to surface. In July, residents who own property along the future path of I-69 began reporting their local waterways were being contaminated. Landowners produced photos of creeks filled with sediment as well as sinkholes filling with brown water.The erosion problems have continued since August, and in the past couple months some contractors have been forced to halt construction while they deal with the issue. Still, landowners say the contamination persists each time the area sees heavy rain.

CREDITS
The best of 2013 is a production of the WFHB News Department.
Today’s episode was produced by Joe Crawford.
Our theme music is provided by Legs
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Local Live – Skeleton Men

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Skeleton Men: Alex Hamel (bass), Michael Morgan (guitar), Danny McKinley (drums)

Bold, dark, instrumental, and surf-rock are words that come mind with Bloomington trio Skeleton Men

1. Witches March
2. Next Victim
3. Summer City
4. Dean Man Waltz
5. Tsunami
6. Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

Bloomington Beware! – Holiday Shopping

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Whether you’re shopping with pen and checkbook, or mouse and keyboard, there are lots of ways to get ripped off during the holidays, if you don’t know how to protect yourself…and your loved ones.

Natural Gas Consumers Forced to Fund New Private Gas Plant

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Today, the Indiana Supreme Court issued a ruling that could force consumers of natural gas in Indiana to pay the long-term construction and operational costs of a private sector coal gasification plant in Southern Indiana. Back in 2010, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission, or the IURC, signed a contract with Leucadia National Corporation to allow the company to pass on the full costs, plus a profit margin, of construction, production, and distribution of output from its proposed coal gasification plant in Spencer County. This unprecedented deal would force the Indiana Financial Authority, or the IFA, which is the state agency that purchases natural gas from producers for distribution across the state to consumers, to purchase Leucadia’s product even if cheaper alternatives are available. This would last from the start of the operation of the proposed Spencer plant through the following thirty years. The deal, dubbed the Leucadia Tax, was met with opposition by industrial and residential consumers, as well as many public interest organizations. A coalition of citizens groups, consumer advocates, environmental groups, faith leaders, and low-income and senior advocacy organizations banded together to challenge the contract in court. In October of 2012, the Indiana Court of Appeals threw out the contract between the IFA and the Indiana subsidiary of Leucadia. The opposition coalition also lobbied the state legislators to take action to kill the Leucadia Tax. In the Spring of 2013, the General Assembly passed Senate Bill 494, which would allow the IURC to review the Leucadia contract, with a view to renegotiating a contract that would better protect Indiana consumers if the Appeals Court decision was eventually upheld by the Indiana Supreme Court. One member of the coalition formed to stop the Leucadia Tax was the Indiana branch of the Sierra Club. Correspondent David Murphy spoke to Jodi Perras, Indiana Campaign Representative for the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

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