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Interchange – Mixed Nuts: Clint Eastwood’s Life In the Movies

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In a 2002 interview Patrick McGilligan said of Clint Eastwood, “I think he’s a lazy actor and a lazy director. He’s a great image. This book is about how the image and the reality complement each other. There’s a false morality about Clint, the false morality of his life, which becomes the false morality of his films. It’s a disgusting reality, it’s all right to get revenge and kill people in nasty ways. It’s OK to triumph in comic book fashion over people as long as they’re evil. The message of his films in human and moral terms is that Clint wins, Clint survives, and good triumphs over evil because he’s always defined as good despite how many people he shoots…” For “Mixed Nuts” we talk with McGilligan about Clint Eastwood’s life and look specifically at a few representative films: Dirty Harry, Unforgiven, and American Sniper.

GUEST
Patrick McGilligan is a film historian and writer. His biography on Alfred Hitchcock, Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light, was a finalist for the Edgar Award. He is the author of two New York Times Notable Books, and he lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He is also noted for his biography on Clint Eastwood, Clint: The Life and Legend (updated and reissued by O/R Books), which reveals much about Eastwood which his official biography by Richard Schickel left out. In addition to Hitchcock and Eastwood, he has written biographies on Robert Altman, James Cagney, George Cukor, Fritz Lang, Oscar Micheaux, Jack Nicholson, and Nicholas Ray. He is also an editor of Backstory, which features interviews of Hollywood screenwriters and is published by the University of California Press.

Clint: The Life and Legend
From the publisher’s website:

With just one syllable, the man is identified: there can only be one Clint, the American lone wolf personified. And now, in the last few years, Clint Eastwood has become the point man for the American conservative movement, known for a certain lecture to an empty chair and his runaway hit “American Sniper.”

When this biography first appeared, it was met with critical praise for its research, and anger on the part of its subject to the point where he sued the author for $10 million: that suit, which resulted in the effective suppression of the book in the United States, was eventually settled without penalty or threat of future reprisal. Now updated and drawing on extensive interviews with intimates, legal documents and behind-the-scenes reportage on the making of his most famous (and obscure) films, Clint: The Life and Legend is, for fans as well as non-fans, the ultimate life story of this corroded pillar of Hollywood.

This update from the original edition encompasses Clint’s personal life since then — divorce, reality television, and Clint’s appearance before the 2012 Republican National Convention — and all his recent films, through to the success and controversy of “American Sniper.”

RELATED
The Man With No Name BBC 1977 Documentary
At Home with Clint Eastwood (1970)
Occurrences of rape in Clint Eastwood movies

MUSIC
Intro: “Gran Torino” (theme) mixed with “Tumbling Tumbleweeds,” performed by Clint Eastwood
First Break: “Don’t Fence Me In,” performed by Clint Eastwood
Second Break: “Barroom Buddies,” performed by Merle Haggard and Clint Eastwood
Outro: “No Sweater Cheater Than You,” performed by Clint Eastwood

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board and Music Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Preview: Sheepdog Theory in Eastwood’s American Sniper

Interchange_Logoby Doug Storm

I watched American Sniper, prepping for tonight’s Interchange interview (6 pm) with Clint Eastwood biographer Patrick McGilligan, and discovered there is a bit of “warrior philosophy” inserted into Chris Kyle’s (the sniper) childhood in order to give him motivation; it’s about sheep, wolves and sheepdogs. Well, this was cribbed for the movie (it’s not in Kyle’s autobiography according to Slate) from a retired military guy named David Grossman from his book On Combat (he has many others with catchy titles, On Killing, for example). Here’s Grossman:

If you have no capacity for violence then you are a healthy productive citizen: a sheep. If you have a capacity for violence and no empathy for your fellow citizens, then you have defined an aggressive sociopath—a wolf. But what if you have a capacity for violence, and a deep love for your fellow citizens? Then you are a sheepdog, a warrior, someone who is walking the hero’s path.

If you dive down the google rabbit hole into this world of “warrior sheepdogs” you find this philosophy rampant among those “defenders of our freedom”–the 2nd Amendment Party–who believe they are sheepdogs. Of course, the military is not their friend because the leaders of the “new world order” recognize that “patriots” are terrorists against the global order.

Indeed down that rabbit hole I found this:

Warrior Class
In 1994 the Pentagon’s deputy chief of staff for intelligence, a Major Ralph Peters, wrote a position paper, Warrior Class:

The desire for patriotism is considered an enemy doctrine. The U.S. armed forces must be prepared to fight against all those who oppose the New World Order and who are holding out for nationalism… This new warrior class is most dangerous because they consist of those who fight out of strong religious beliefs… There is a worldwide class of patriots (i.e., “terrorists”) who number in the millions, and if the current trend continues, there may be more of these who…love freedom and are the target of the New World Order… You cannot bargain and compromise with these warriors… We, as the military, need to commit more training to counter these warrior threats. We must have an active campaign to win over the populace. This must be coupled with irresistible violence.
- from the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor, May/June 1994

There you have it. Patriotic American Gunowners are the number one Enemy of the New World Order. Since we can’t be bargained or compromised with, prepare for “irresistible violence.”

We don’t need to use “McAlvany Intelligence Advisor” as the source for this, but can just google the author, Ralph Peters. This quote comes from this paper in Parameters called The New Warrior Class (a very dangerous one apparently). Parameters, in case you were unaware, is the US Army War College Quarterly journal.

As interesting to me is that the Wikipedia entry for Peters does not list this particular publication but promotes Peters primarily as a novelist, and as a talking head expert for Fox News. Also interesting is that here are two retired military “experts” offering the “pro” and “con” of the so-called sheepdog. By the way, the sheepdogs, as far as I can tell, are protecting an ideology, not actual “sheep,” weakling people who don’t carry guns and are not very manly. And Grossman classes police with soldiers. So all these Black men being killed by police are wolves then?

Here’s a link to the sheepdog scene in American Sniper on the Youtube, and here is clip of David Grossman selling his sheepdog wares. And here is a clip of Sam Sheepdog and Ralph Wolf.

Please note that Eastwood begins the scene with a shot of the pocket Bible Chris Kyle will take with him into the military and Iraq. There is zero evidence that Eastwood himself has any personal interest in religion or “faith.”

What’s troubling about movies as products is that one can evade responsibility for any philosophy on the screen. Eastwood could simply be telling this story the way he thinks it should be told as coming from the subject, Chris Kyle; the way an audience will best identify with it; possibly as representative of his own belief. Without him saying, “I believe X and I intended the audience to identify/sympathize with X point of view,” I can’t really put this on Eastwood the man. But I can’t call this art either. It’s a cultural product made for entertainment and profit. Made with skill and talent, but art? As far as I can tell Eastwood makes money, not art. He makes money real good! I imagine him not as a believer but as an opportunistic cynic. Still, that opinion has no authority. McGilligan’s biography does, however, give it quite a bit of ballast.

RELATED: Scott Horton (who has appeared on Interchange) posted this on Facebook with a link to a news article in German–American sheepdogs?

When a gunman armed with a Kalashnikov threatened passengers on the Amsterdam to Paris train, the service personnel locked themselves away in a bathroom and were utterly useless, but three young Americans took the initiative at grave physical risk to subdue the assailant and prevent a massacre. Does this tell us something about the difference between Americans and Europeans? Yes, argues Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung editor Lorenz Hemicker, “In the US, the people believe that they are responsible for their own safety first and foremost. That may lead to some other social problems. But on Friday, this conviction led to saving the lives of hundreds. And that should give us reason to pause.”

Interchange – The Right to Dignity: Service Sector Workers and the Future of Unions

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Do service-sector workers represent the future of the U.S. labor movement?

Mid-twentieth-century union activism transformed manufacturing jobs from backbreaking, low-wage work into careers that allowed workers to buy homes and send their kids to college. Some union activists insist that there is no reason why service-sector workers cannot follow that same path…As one Indiana-based organizer says of the struggle being waged in a state that has earned a reputation as antiunion: “If we can win here, we can win anywhere.” The outcome of the battle of Indianapolis may foretell the fate of workers across the United States.

TOPICS
Right-to-Work; Minimum Wage; Living Wage; Alt-labor; Wage Theft; Subcontracting

GUEST
Fran Quigley is a clinical professor of law in the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, teaching in the Health and Human Rights Clinic. Students in the Health and Human Rights Clinic advocate for the rights of the poor, with a special focus on representing low-wage workers.

Professor Quigley is the author of several academic journal articles on social justice and human rights, multiple mass media articles and columns, and three books, How Human Rights Can Build Haiti: The Activists, the Lawyers, and the Grassroots Movement (Vanderbilt University Press, 2014), If We Can Win Here:The New Front Lines of the Labor Movement (Cornell University Press, 2015), and Walking Together, Walking Far: How a U.S. and African Medical School Partnership Is Winning the Fight Against the HIV/AIDS Pandemic (Indiana University Press, 2009). Previous to his work at the law school, he served as director of operations for the Indiana-Kenya Partnership/AMPATH and as a staff attorney with Indiana Legal Services.

Pre-recorded interview (8/12/15) with Chalondias Smith, home care worker and member of SEIU Healthcare Indiana/Illinois/Missouri/Kansas.

MUSIC
“Union Burying Ground” by Woody Guthrie
“Working Class Hero” by Screaming Trees
“There is Power In The union” by Billy Bragg
“Bread and Roses” by Judy Collins

RELATED
An IU Professor’s Upcoming Book Is On Low-Wage Worker’s; A Conversation With A Home Health Care Worker In Indianapolis

Indiana Senate narrowly passes repeal of common wage

UNITE HERE!

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board and Music Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Keeping a Hand in Mind: Reading and Writing in a Digital World

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Should we try to understand reading and writing as primary ways of making a particular kind of human; a way we embody consciousness. Are you “formed” in the forming act? For example, with your hands you made letters and words–you write (not type) a self–you are embodied in the language you craft. Memory lives in the act. Without the act the self subsides and you become the vessel–the clay pot and not the potter.

How does digital mediation affect not only how we read and write, but who we are?

TOPICS DISCUSSED
The physicality of books (smell and touch); the aspect of “possession” of the tangible book as opposed to the ephemeral nature of the digital; children’s use of a pen or pencil to practice writing letters enhances language learning.

RELATED
The Myth of Impoverished Signal” (Naomi Baron on the “Smiley”)

Brain activation patterns resulting from learning letter forms through active self-production and passive observation in young children” by Karin James

GUESTS
Naomi Baron is the author of Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World and most recently Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World. She is a Professor of Linguistics and the Executive Director of Center for Teaching, Research and Learning World Languages and Cultures at American University in Washington, D.C.

Karin James is an Associate Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Director of the The Cognition and Action Neuroimaging Laboratory at Indiana University. Her research program centers around the idea that direct, physical interactions with the environment changes the brain processing that underlies learning, and is important for the acquisition of many cognitive skills.

MUSIC
“Words I Manifest” by Gang Starr
“My Pen and Pad” by Blackalicious
“Kodachrome” by Paul Simon
“Read a Book” by Pylon

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Joe Crawford
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Is a Woman a Person? Needing Ellen Willis More Than Ever

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So, here we are, August 4th, 2015, and I’m asking “Is a Woman A Person?” You laugh, no, scoff at me for asking this. Of course!, you say. But are we “persons” by degrees with some considered lesser beings? Consider the concerted attack on women’s health funding by Republicans seeking to defund Planned Parenthood. It seems women ought to be tethered to reproduction and firmly under the control of the male head of the family. Right? We’ll look at the essays of Ellen Willis in this program as a way to investigate the longevity of this male supremacist attack on women.

On June 30 I talked with Ellen Willis’s daughter, Nona Willis Aronowitz, who had edited a selection of Ellen Willis’s essays, about Willis’s life and her influence as a writer,, which included her work as a music critic–rock music critic–for the New Yorker magazine, but was mostly political, and always feminist. We didn’t dig too deeply into the specifics of the Radical Feminism of Ellen Willis that night.

But, with the continuous onslaught against women primarily through access to care, which seems to be about restricting access to biological options regarding reproduction, we should return to Ellen Willis. No, we must to return to Ellen Willis.

There was something of a dismissive review of The Essential Ellen Willis in the Los Angeles Review of Books back in May of 2014 by Lisa Levy. It disparaged Willis exactly where I would praise her for sounding one particular feminist note for forty years. For FOUR decades what remained consistent for women while Ellen Willis was writing for both a popular and academic audience? The attack on women’s individual rights. The ongoing commitment to restricting women from being able to decide without the imposition of a man and a male supremacist society how to live their lives as equal human beings. But the book reviewer seemed to tired of that complaint, or too tired of having to read about it over and over.

GUEST
Jennifer Maher, Director of Undergraduate Studies and Senior Lecturer in Gender Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington.

MUSIC
Aretha Franklin – “RESPECT”
Eurythmics – “Sisters are Doing It For Themselves”
Beyonce – “Run The World (Girls)”
Bikini Kill – “Rebel Girl”

ARTICLES REFERENCED
“Abortion: Is a Woman a Person?” (Village Voice, 1979)
“Radical Feminism and Feminist Radicalism” (Social Text, 1984)

RELATED
Interchange – What Makes Us Vulnerable: The Essential Ellen Willis
Interchange – Impulse Under the Influence: Campus Rape Culture
Interchange – Rape and White Male Privilege

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board and Music Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Orson Around: In Conversation with Jonathan Rosenbaum and James Naremore

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Tonight’s program “Orson Around,” is a glimpse at the life and movies of Orson Welles.

This conversation took place in the breakfast room at the Grant Street Inn in Bloomington earlier in the year during the week that Indiana University hosted a Welles Symposium to celebrate his centenary. Yes, Orson Welles was born 100 years ago. But he still seems ahead of us.

We begin with Jonathan Rosenbaum talking about Oja Kodar, who was the principal collaborator and partner of Orson Welles during the last twenty-four years of his life. She was a muse, no doubt, and an artist in her own right. Kodar surely complicates this statement Welles made in the 1950s to the French writer Maurice Bessy (and that Jim Naremore talks about later in the program), “I hate women, but I need them…Women block all conversation. That dates from the day they won the right to vote. They should have stayed slaves.” Jonathan Rosenbaum says that Welles’s unfinished film The Other Side of the Wind might be called his only feminist film. Of course its female star, played by Oja Kodar, doesn’t speak a word.

GUESTS
James Naremore is the author of five books and dozens of essays on film and modern literature, and is the editor of four volumes of film criticism and theory. His research deals with a variety of writers, directors, and performers, including such figures as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, John Huston, and Vincente Minnelli. He is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Communication and Culture and Indiana University.

Jonathan Rosenbaum was the chief film critic for the Chicago Reader for twenty years, and has written of film for many other publications. He is the also the author of many books, including Movies as Politics. He publishes his criticism on his own website, jonathanrosenbaum.net.

MUSIC
From the Henri Mancini soundtrack to Touch of Evil: “Main Theme,” “Tara’s Theme,” and “Orson Around.” We also heard excerpts from the movies Citizen Kane, F for Fake, Moby Dick, and Touch of Evil.

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Drones at Liberty: Part Two

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Part 2 of Drones at Liberty: Our conversation continues to explore the meaning of drones–drones as instruments of war and policing, drones in the public imaginary, drones as extensions of state and/or human will–all topics under examination at the recent IU Symposium on Drone Warfare.

All technologies are transgressive.

It seems to me that normalization is the issue. Spying technologies have been around for a long time and yet there surely was a “peeping Tom” (men!) stigma as well as a respect for privacy–plus, who cares what normal life someone else was leading–ah, but prurience cultivated over the decades has increasingly led us to acknowledge that life is boring, yet hope that some folks perhaps are not boring, or that spying as a transgression is not boring BECAUSE it’s a transgression not for what is revealed through spying. Our television shows and movies normalize torture and spying and now the piloting of UAVs across the thousands of miles.

I would go so far as to argue that acceptable use inevitably paves the way for the transgression, and that the transgression is the fullest expression of the technology.

But, as many presenters made plain, the policing and terror apparatus is already firmly in place, and UAVs are an “in-kind” application that will further the constant machine surveillance and control of humanity.

With apologies to Emily Dickinson:

I heard a DRONE buzz – when I died –
The Stillness in the Room
Was like the Stillness in the Air –

and then it was
There interposed a DRONE –

With Blue – uncertain stumbling Buzz –
Between the light – and me –
And then the Windows failed – and then
I could not see to see –

GUESTS
Ishan Ashutosh, Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at Indiana University, is a critical human geographer whose work encompasses the study of migration, the politics of race and ethnicity from an international and comparative perspective, and urban studies. His research examines the multiple and contested representations of South Asia through projects situated in migration and area studies.

Chris Miles is a PhD student in the Department of Communication and Culture at Indiana University. His work focuses on the intellectual, political, and material relationships between capitalism, media technologies, and nature. In particular, he studies informatic media and digital technology integrated into or pattered on biology and biological processes.

MUSIC
The Flaming Lips, “Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, Pt. 1″
The Police, “Bombs Away”
The Flaming Lips, “Do You Realize??”
The Flaming Lips, “All We Have Is Now”

OF INTEREST
41 men targeted but 1,147 people killed

RELATED
Interchange – Drones At Liberty: Part One
Interchange – Terror Skies: The Drone as Judge and Jury
Interchange – Colin Allen: Thinking About Thinking Machines

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board and Music Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Innovation Is Nothing New: Novelty in the Middle Ages

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Popular models of innovation (including buzzwords such as “creative destruction” or “disruptive innovation”) prize getting rid of anything that’s old. But some folks are starting to reimagine innovation in different terms: as reusing, recycling, refurbishing, sampling, or updating the old. In her new book, The Medieval New, Patricia Ingham shows that creative models combining old AND new have a long and interesting innovating history. Focusing on the period that gave us eye glasses, windmills, courtly love, and mechanical clocks, (not to mention falconry and the blast furnace), Ingham asks us to reconsider what we think we mean by calling something new.

I. Rethinking “new” as opposed to the “old”: how the medieval question was organized differently (not old versus new but ingenium vs. consuetudo, so inborn, though idiosyncratic, talent vs. convention, or things generally agreed upon); “cultures of artistic copying”– creative works were not a completely “original” poem or story, but a work engaged with, updating, reworking, or repurposing stories or poems long admired; things “discovered” not made out of nothing; creativity as an engagement with tradition as well as “environment.”

II. Medieval ambivalence about “newness” on account of questions of Ethics: both in medieval literature and art where newfangledness is regularly used as an ambivalent term. Ambivalence and its definition: as simultaneously, or possibly, loved, but also possibly hated, etc. In contrast to today where too often people assume that anything “new” is, by definition, good, what we want, etc.; historians of science and technology who don’t all see the path of history as one of unrelenting “progress.”

III. Innovation and the University: We are said to be currently in an Age of Innovation–but we don’t always think too hard about what innovation entails. The University as an institution has long drawn together both strands of the “medieval new”: histories of re-reading, remaking, repurposing; but also ingenious solutions to long standing problems, concerns.

GUEST
Patricia Ingham, Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Indiana University and Editor of Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and author of The Medieval New: Ambivalence in an Age of Innovation.

OF INTEREST
Innovators are killing us
The Disruption Machine

RELATED
Vijay Iyer’s Life in Music: “Striving is the Back Story”

MUSIC
The Hilliard Ensemble, “O Livoris Feritas, M9″ (Guillaume de Machaut)
Nice & Smooth, “Old to the New”
Derek and the Dominoes, “Layla”
Us3, “Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)”–sample Herbie Hancock’s “Cantaloupe Island”
Madlib, “Slim’s Return”–originally recorded by Gene Harris & The Three Sounds as “The Book of Slim”

NEXT WEEK
Part Two of Drones at Liberty

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Joe Crawford
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Drones At Liberty: Part One

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This is the first of a two-part program based on a symposium to be held at Indiana University called Reconfiguring Global Space: The Geography, Politics, and Ethics of Drone War.

In warfare against savage tribes who do not conform to codes of civilized warfare aerial bombardment is not necessarily limited in its methods or objectives by rules agreed upon in international law. –Royal Air Force Chief of the Air Staff, Hugh Trenchard, March 1, 1924.

“To be against the drone program is like being against the Internet.” Ethan Hawke, actor.

GUESTS
Majed Akhter is an Assistant Professor of Geography at Indiana University Bloomington. He is a human geographer working at the intersection of political ecology/economy, development studies, and the history and politics of South Asia. His research queries how the spatiality of state power shapes, and is shaped by, transnational and transregional processes.

Hamid Ekbia is an Associate Professor of Informatics, Cognitive Science, and International Studies, and Director of the Center for Research on Mediated Interaction. His work focuses on mediation, that is, on the processes through which objects and meanings are transformed in hybrid networks of interaction. In particular, he wants to understand how technologies mediate interactions among individuals, organizations, and collectives. He is the author of Artificial Dreams: The Quest for Non­biological Intelligence (2008).

MUSIC
Jon Langford, “Drone Operator”
The Alan Parsons Project, “Eye In The Sky”

MOVIE TRAILERS
Good Kill, written and directed by Andrew Niccol
Wounds of Waziristan, a documentary film by Madiha Tahir

RELATED
Interchange – Terror Skies: The Drone as Judge and Jury

NEXT WEEK
The Medieval New
Popular models of innovation (including buzzwords such as “creative destruction” or “disruptive innovation”) prize getting rid of anything that’s old. But some of us are starting to reimagine innovation in different terms: as reusing, recycling, refurbishing, sampling, or updating the old. In her new book, Patricia Ingham shows that creative models combining old AND new have a long and interesting innovating history. Focusing on the period that gave us eye glasses, windmills, courtly love, and mechanical clocks, (not to mention falconry and the blast furnace), Ingham asks us to reconsider what we think we mean by calling something new.

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board & Music Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Production Assistance: Kara Tullman
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – What Makes Us Vulnerable: The Essential Ellen Willis

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Our topic for the next hour is the cultural and critical writing of Ellen Willis who was the New Yorker‘s first rock critic and the cofounder of the radical feminist group the Redstockings. Her essays have been described as always unsettling, combining passion and moral clarity, espresso for the feminist soul, and relevant as ever, with a continuing influence on critics of American culture today.

Ellen Willis was a great fan and a great “reader” of Bob Dylan. I’ll have to admit as someone with little invested in Dylan and it was only in reading Willis’s “breakout” essay on Dylan published first in the magazine Cheetah in 1967 (and called “Dylan”) that I was intellectually engaged in thinking about Dylan and the album that the song appears on, John Wesley Harding. This album, appearing to be a retreat back onto well-trod ground, was rather a work serving the purpose of liberation…that is liberating Dylan, and the rest of us, from the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper. More on that in the program.

Joining us via phone is Nona Willis Aronowitz, the daughter of Ellen Willis, who has edited two collections of her mother’s essays both published by the University of Minnesota Press, one called Out of the Vinyl Deeps, consists of Willis’s Rock criticism and the other, The Essential Ellen Willis, spans four decades and seems to cover nearly every topic of social and cultural importance you might think of (abortion, radical feminism, sexism terrorism, the family, male supremacy, terrorism, motherhood, racism, Judaism, fundamentalism, liberalism, and on).

A key theme that often runs through Willis’s work is vulnerability and her writing style seems to be pitched towards always understanding that common quality. The best way to understand this I think might be to think of it simply as respect for any audience to which she might be speaking. This seems more and more a very rare quality.

Guest
Nona Willis Aronowitz is the editor of TalkingPointsMemo’s The Slice and TPMCafe. Previously, she was an education and poverty reporter at NBC News Digital, a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and an associate editor at GOOD magazine. She’s written for The Atlantic, Washington Post, NYMag.com, The Nation, The American Prospect, Tablet, and Rookie, among others.

Related
Ellen Willis Tumblr
There are photos and many links to Willis’s essays and reviews of the two collections edited by Nona Willis Aronowitz along with some video.

Music
“All Along the Watchtower” by Bob Dylan
“Maybe” by Janis Joplin
“Someday Never Comes” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
“Beginning to See the Light” by The Velvet Underground

Credits
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Joe Crawford
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

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