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Tag Archives: slavery

MCCSC Terminates Contract Over Racist Content

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Yesterday, the Monroe County Community School Corporation voted to end a contract with a text-book provider over racist and insensitive content. MCCSC Spokesman Andrew Clampitt says the issue came to the attention of the administration on February 10th, when a parent complained. Clampitt speaks with WFHB News Director Wes Martin about the administration’s decision to sever ties with the educational …

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Interchange – Storied States: James Scott’s Against the Grain

EXTENDED TAKE (Radio Cut below) Today’s show is Storied States and is something of “counter-companion” to last week’s program, Storied Into Being, with Anthology Editor and Literature professor Martin Puchner. That show followed the stories which accompanied writing technology on its roughly 5,000 year journey from the accountants of ancient Mesopotamia (which means between two rivers) to the entrepreneurship of …

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Interchange – Walking the Talk: The Revolutionary Abolitionist Benjamin Lay

Today, the curious case of Benjamin Lay: Englishman, Quaker, cobbler, sailor, cultural shock firebrand, cave dweller, autodidact, animal liberationist, and outspoken critic of the hypocrisy of slave-owning Quakers in 18th century Pennsylvania. He would become known as one of the last radicals of the English revolution — an uprising in the mid 17th century against royal power, and an early …

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Interchange – The Capitalized Womb: The Slave-Breeding Industry in America

We begin with “My Old Kentucky Home” by 19th century songwriter Stephen Foster, performed by Paul Robeson. Sung like a love song to the state of Kentucky by the Derby crowd at Churchill Downs, its real historical meaning is bleaker. The lyrics portray heartbreak: A man, sold down the river to work at a sugar plantation in the deep south, …

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Interchange – Unfounded America: Taking Out the Myth with the Trash

For “Unfounded America” we’re joined by Nancy Isenberg author of the popular and provocative new book, White Trash: The 400-year Untold Story of Class in America. Laura Miller writes of the book in Salon: Tapping into scores of sources, Isenberg traces the emergence of the white-trash stereotype from its roots in British beliefs that the working class was truly a …

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Interchange – An Extended Conversation with Nancy Isenberg: Unfounded America

Interchange offers a no-frills, 80-minute conversation with White Trash author Nancy Isenberg–just she and I talking on the telephone. In this extended episode you’ll hear Isenberg’s take on the Broadway sensation Hamilton as well as more about the necessity of education to “unfound” our national myths to create a citizen properly skeptical of political and cultural ideologies. RELATED Unfounded America: …

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Interchange – Ghosts, Dogs, and the Law: On Constructing Criminality and Negating Persons

The law is a kind of haunting. In single words the history of slavery and denigration can be discovered. And it’s through these words, through the retention of their meaning in their original application, through that first life where they did their original work, that they haunt us. Our program is a conversation with Colin Dayan, author most recently of …

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Interchange – Paul Robeson: The Most Dangerous Man In America

It’s primary Tuesday here in Indiana and the Democratic primary features a candidate whose rhetoric focuses on workers’ rights and social democracy and it seems as if this were subversive…it’s not, or not very, as Noam Chomsky has called Bernie Sanders a New Deal Democrat–or what was once a mainstream political position. So for this program, we’re going to take …

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Interchange – Confronting Black Jacobins: “The Cannibals of the Terrible Republic”

It was Thomas Jefferson who called the Black Jacobins “the cannibals of the terrible republic” in a letter to Aaron Burr dated 11 February 1799. …it is impossible the French should invade us since the annihilation of their power on the sea, our constituents will see in these preparations the utmost anxiety to guard them against even impossibilities. the Southern …

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Interchange – Embodied By Prisons: First the Whip, Then the Chains, and Then…

What comes after Whips and Chains? Solitary confinement. Lisa Guenther of Vanderbilt University discusses the reformist good intentions of Benjamin Rush in the 1790s who developed the idea that solitary confinement could serve to “clean” the criminal of the impulses to transgress. We also discuss the 13th Amendment and its “partial emancipation” of enslaved Black people and how this Amendment …

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