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Tag Archives: frontpage

Help Brown County Hour Raise Money for a New Studio

The Brown County Hour has moved its operations into the new Brown County Historical Society building and is happy to have more space to record in, but needs to build a studio space to provide the quality recording that Brown County–and the rest of south central Indiana–deserves. You can help them pay for it by coming out to enjoy some fine Brown County musicians and participating in a silent auction.

November 1

7 – 10 PM at the Brown County Inn’s Town Hall

$10 entry

Interchange – Brave New GMOs

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Tonight’s guest is long-time critic of genetically modified organisms and foods, Marti Crouch, a noted academic research scientist in plant molecular biology who turned her back on that career due to concerns about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture.

With and a new wave of genetically engineered crops (GMOs) about to be commercialized, the battle for hearts and minds is heating up. Are GMOs required to feed the burgeoning population and to save the planet, as the biotech industry claims, or are GMOs a toxic hindrance to true food security and environmental sustainability, as critics contend? Join our guest, long-time GMO critic Marti Crouch, as we explore the implications of Dow Chemical’s new corn and soybeans engineered to withstand the WWII-era weedkiller 2,4-D – approved by federal regulators just a few weeks ago; Monsanto’s new herbicide-resistant cotton and soybean, Arctic apples that don’t turn brown, eucalyptus trees that withstand freezing, golden rice designed to alleviate vitamin A deficiencies, and other brave new crops on our horizon.

Ralph Waldo Emerson writes in his great 1842 Essay Experience that “Nature hates calculators; her methods are saltatory and impulsive.”

Marti Crouch has written that “Genes have an ecology – a complex way of interacting with themselves and the environment – that can interfere with the linear logic of genetic engineering.”

Nature leaps and dances upon (and over and under and to the side of) the linear…

Guest Bio:

Martha Crouch, Ph.D., Science Consultant

Marti was a graduate student at Yale University studying the development of seeds and flowers when genes were first cloned in the 1970s.  By the time she headed her own plant molecular biology lab at Indiana University in the 1980s, plant genes were being patented. Prof. Crouch became concerned about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture and her own contributions, and as a result shut down her research lab in the 1990s and taught courses on the intersections of technology, food and agriculture, with an emphasis on environmental impacts. In 2001, Marti left Indiana University, and now pursues independent scholarship and consulting.  Her background thus spans the whole history of genetic engineering in agriculture, as both a participant and a critic, giving Marti a valuable set of skills and perspectives for her work on impacts of recent technologies for non-profits such as the Center for Food Safety.  Marti is also the official wild mushroom inspector at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative Holds Annual Meeting

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Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative held its annual meeting of the membership last week. The General Manager and Board president both addressed the crowd of more than 300 attendees, focusing their summaries on the recent efforts of Bloomingfoods workers to join a union. There were also break out discussions focused on the unionization efforts, management/employee relations, and board communications. WFHB correspondent David Murphy attended the meeting, and spoke with Bloomingfoods President Tim Clougher. Their discussion, here, in today’s community report.

Local Live – Lost Catfish

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Blues-rock trio Lost Catfish joins us in the studio for an exclusive live performance.

SONGS
1. Factory Work
2. Untamed Touch
3. The Wolf Song
4. Handle With Care
5. Woman Got No Soul

Lost Catfish is Jack Whittle – Guitar/Vocals, Steve Laine – Bass/Vocals, The Reverend Taylor Allen Harmon – Drums

Hollywood Producer To Teach At IU’s New Media School

Indiana University alumnus and Hollywood producer Michael Uslan is joining the new Indiana University Media School as a Professor of Practice in film.

Uslan has three decades of experience in motion picture, television, and internet work. His work includes executive producer of 1989’s “Batman” movie, later sequels including the academy award-winning “The Dark Knight,” and “National Treasure.” He is also the author of a fundamental textbook on comics and 25 other books on the history of comics and other topics.

Uslan earned a bachelors degree in history, a masters degree in education, and a Doctor of Jurisprudence, all from Indiana University.

While teaching at IU, Uslan will continue his off-campus work in motion pictures, television, and interactive and international media. In a press release, Uslan praised IU’s new Media School program calling it a premiere location between New York and Hollywood for students to prepare for careers in the film industry.

The newly appointed Uslan will speak about his transition from IU graduate to Hollywood producer at 7 p.m on Wednesday, October 22 at the Whittenberger Auditorium in the Indiana Memorial Union.

State Board of Education Delays Release Of Indiana School’s A-F Grades

The Indiana State Board of Education delayed the release of the Department of Education’s A-to-F School Accountability grades until November 5.

Representatives of public, private and charter schools feel criteria for the grades are unfair and addressed their concerns to the board at their meeting October 15th. According to the DOE’s website, Indiana’s school grading system provides communities with a clear and concise assessment of how their schools are performing. State law requires the state to intervene in a school that receives an “F” for six consecutive years.

Though the grades are not yet official, the Herald Times reported that Bloomington’s Fairview School will likely receive its third “F” this year. Accountability findings are based on eight data points established to measure each school’s final grade.

In previous board meetings, the SBOE established criteria for an appeals process and amidst protests from “atypically configured” schools, or schools that don’t fall within the language of the accountability rule, the SBOE voted to assess atypical schools on a case-by-case basis rather than force a formulaic approach.

Board member Dr. Brad Oliver, Sixth District representative, noted that it was important to focus on what he referred to as “substantive due process” and to apply a common sense approach to grading schools.

“If these letter grades don’t communicate something reasonable based on the data, what good are they anyway?” Oliver says.

Several schools protested DOE findings, claiming final letter grades were based on only two of the eight possible data points gathered, thus judging the school on only a fourth of their population. SBOE board member Sarah O’Brien, Fourth District Representative, wants the grading system to have integrity.

“When we release all of these grades across the state, I want them to mean something. Looking at the data before us, I’m going to make sure I do whatever I can within statute and rule to make sure that the letter grades match what we’re seeing in those buildings,” O’Brien says.

Bloomingfoods employees and co-op members rally during annual meeting in support of unionization

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WFHB Correspondent David Murphy attended Bloomingfood’s annual meeting last week and an accompanying rally by those who support a recent effort by workers to form a union. Today we hear comments from the rally for our Daily Local News community report.

Interchange – Part II of To Cull Is to Kill

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Host Doug Storm welcomes guests Alyce Miller, Dave Rollo, Sandra Shapshay, and Lisa Sideris for Part II of our discussion about the Griffy Lake Nature Preserve deer cull scheduled to begin in November and last through the end of February.

There is great contention between groups opposed to the violent intervention of a kill and those who feel the kill is necessary to protect biodiversity at Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

We try in the second half of the show to understand the “gift” in Genesis 1:28.

And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.(KJV)

The implicit question in both of our programs comes from Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring:

Who has decided—who has the right to decide—for the countless legions of people who were not consulted that the supreme value is a world without insects, even though it be also a sterile world ungraced by the curving wing of a bird in flight? The decision is that of the authoritarian temporarily entrusted with power; he has made it during a moment of inattention by millions to whom beauty and the ordered world of nature still have meaning that is deep and imperative.

For Questions or Comments please email us: interchange@wfhb.org.

Of related interest:

Two groups of note are mentioned in the program: The Humane Society of the United States and The Nature Conservancy. Here are the “SourceWatch” pages for both.

The Nature Conservancy
The Humane Society of the United States

Credits:
Host and Producer, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

IU To Dedicate New Media School And Ernie Pyle Sculpture

On Friday, October 17 Indiana University will inaugurate its newest school on the Bloomington campus, the Media School, with the dedication of a new sculpture of IU alumnus and Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Ernie Pyle.

The sculptor is Harold Langland, professor emeritus, who taught at IU South Bend from 1971-2001.

According to IU officials, Langland will present the sculpture to IU President Michael McRobbie at a public ceremony beginning at 2 p.m. in Franklin Hall, the future home of the Media School.

Previously Langland created a sculpture of IU’s legendary President and Chancellor Herman B. Wells. That sculpture, seated on a bench near the student union, has become a popular spot for photographers as well as students and visitors.

The Media School is now envisioned as IU’s pre-eminent site for teaching, research and service about the understanding and production of media by combining over 70 faculty members specializing in journalism, cinema, communications and culture, and electronic telecommunication programs.

“The fluid technology environment of the 21st century offers our students and faculty and opportunity to boldly imagine the shape of media in the coming decades,” Larry D. Songell, executive Dean of Arts and Sciences says.

Meanwhile, this new academic unit within the College of Arts and Sciences is now in search of its first dean at the same time that renovation of Franklin Hall itself will soon begin.

Interchange – To Cull Is To Kill: Part One

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Host Doug Storm welcomes Alyce Miller, Dave Rollo, and Sandra Shapshay to discuss Bloomington’s approach to deer management in the city limits and at Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

From the acknowledgments page of City of Bloomington’s Deer Task Force Report:

While the State has exclusive jurisdiction over deer management [IDNR representatives] have worked hard to listen to the concerns of the Task Force and the community to help us develop recommendations that suit the unique needs of Bloomington and Monroe County. And while they never complained about our interminable meetings or endless questions, no doubt Aldo Leopold’s observation that “The real problem of wildlife management is not how we should handle the animals…the real problem is one of human management” rings true…

The decision to define deer populations as stable, healthy, abundant, overabundant, or call them rats with hooves, or nuisance animals, or even the opposite of this such as the quasi-mystical forest denizen deserving of reverence, is to impose a human worldview upon them. And it is the act of managing this worldview that is as important as the decision to contract the sharpshooters of the company White Buffalo to kill the animal in question.

Because there is so much to talk about on the subject of the lethal cull of deer by sharpshooters in Griffy Lake Nature Preserve as well as the change to the city’s municipal code to allow firearms to be discharged with the city limits we’re going to continue this program next week on our 10/14 program. We’ll be joined again by Dave Rollo, Alyce Miller and Sandra Shapshay.

So Part II of To Cull is Kill: The Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Deer Kill next week on Interchange.

Of related interest:
Effects of abundant white-tailed deer on vegetation, animals, mycorrhizal fungi, and soils

Credits:

Host and Producer, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

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