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Tag Archives: Firehouse News

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 2: Generally Speaking

WFHB’s Annual Meeting (June 7th, Monroe County History Center, 12:15PM) signals a time of reflection for me. It is the first anniversary of my time as general manager of the station, the first meeting following the end of WFHB’s fiscal year, and a time to look back at the year’s progress and plan for the next.

I announced a number of goals I wanted to work toward last November in addition to those outlined in the station’s strategic plan:  expanding the staff, creating or taking advantage of opportunities for WFHB to gain exposure in the broader listening area, and establishing more avenues for communication among volunteers and to the public.

We launched the Firehouse News, our quarterly e-newsletter, as part of that effort, which would not have been possible without a capable volunteer staff (Carol Fischer, Helen Harrell, Karen Roszkowski, Maryll Jones and Mike Glab). We hope you’ve enjoyed the product so far and will continue to do so.

With help from former WFHB general manager Markus Lowe and Volunteer Coordinator Kelly Wherley, we also reinstituted monthly meetings using a round table format. These meetings are led by volunteers and serve as an excellent delivery mechanism for ideas and discussion, as well as a way for volunteers and staff to meet each other and celebrate their love for community radio together.

Again with significant help from Markus Lowe, we launched the new website in August. Since then, we’ve been uploading most organization meeting minutes for transparency. You can find them here. Articles from the previous newsletters and much, much more can be found there, as well.

Brian Kearney helped us raise funds to hire a full-time development director in the coming fiscal year. The station made tremendous headway in many respects over the last 10 years, but annual revenues have remained relatively flat. It is our hope that a development director will help grow the station’s finances and create new relationships in the wider community moving forward. We expect this person to be hired by August 2014. You can read the job description here. If you would like to apply for the position, or know someone who would, please send a resume and cover letter to manager@wfhb.org.

WFHB partnered with agencies outside of Bloomington whenever possible. Last month alone, we were in the Spring Blossom Parade in Nashville and at the 4th Annual John Hartford Memorial Festival in Bean Blossom. Over the last year, we also partnered with Salt Creek Brewery for the 1st Annual Bedford Blues and Brews, the Indiana Boys for a CD release show at the Brown County Playhouse in Nashville, the Village Arts Walk in Nashville, and Tim Grimm’s CD release shows at Russian Recording in Bloomington and The Commons in Columbus.

Establishing a strong presence in the communities WFHB broadcasts to will continue to be a major goal for the foreseeable future.

We will also work to strengthen our partnership with Community Access Television Services, lay the groundwork for the regular pursuit of grants, and review and revise our bylaws and governance document. To learn more about these plans, attend WFHB’s Annual Meeting or look out for the minutes on our website.

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 2: WFHB Technical Engineer Report

By Helen Harrell

Institutions are contained in buildings and these structures usually have cornerstones as a designation of their beginning.  Seems that can also be true of community radio stations as WFHB has a true cornerstone in engineer, historian, original visionary and overall man of all trades Jeffrey Morris.  To say that Morris has been instrumental in not only the founding of WFHB but its ongoing existence is merely an understatement.  While many folks were around in the beginning (and some still are) and played significant roles in establishing what is now a leader in Southern Indiana Community Radio, Morris has been there from the beginning. Not only did he submit required paperwork, applications, licensing and other government documents and forms to ensure a spot on the radio dial but he also saw to the  purchasing, erecting and maintaining of the main signal tower.  Acquiring the firehouse location, designing air rooms, purchasing and maintaining equipment all came under his purview.  And yes, he had lots of help and support along the way but after speaking with him for an hour or so it’s obvious that his dream for a real community supported and operated, democratically representative radio station has been his motivation regardless  of other associations and assistance. It’s prudent to note that Morris was always a volunteer and received little if no compensation for his many years and hours of work to bring WFHB to the reality it is today.

Many years later Morris has become a partially paid employee and while the compensation is hardly comparable to his expertise it is well deserved.  As an example, much of the station operating equipment is old and not only can’t be replaced/repaired but parts are no longer available.  Just call on Morris and he will find a way to fix it!!!  The power is out, the furnace or A/C stops working just call Morris!   An electrician by professional trade Morris brings an expertise to the station that would just be impossible to replace even though that thought does not occur to those who understand what’s what with electronics, equipment and dedication.

Even though Morris is older than most of the current volunteers he is comfortable in the digital age and has had little difficulty moving the station in the modern direction of digitization.  The only stumbling block is one that has always been an issue and that is enough funding for new equipment and facilities updates.  While making do with little is frequently a mantra at the station Morris knows that many updates are needed if WFHB is to continue competing in the local radio market.  Some of his wish list items are for appearance and comfort which are valid needs as well as new updated broadcasting equipment.  Many community members stepped up in the beginning to launch WFHB including such icons as Herman B Wells, Sarkes Tarzian and the Waldron family. However those resources have long been spent and new funding is needed to purchase items such as a new 98.1 transmitter HD, a new airboard and audioarts IP-12, audio network IO interfaces, 3/rewire cat 5/6 cables and codecs for remote broadcasts for an estimated total of $36,500.  Other items on the wish list are cleaning and painting the studio tower and remounting of the Marti antenna, repair, paint gate, new fence and grading and driveway stone at the transmitter building and finish the ‘cage’ (editing room) with wiring, drywall, trim and door.  These latter expenses total $11,500.  So for a grand total of $47,000 many needed improvements and advancements could be made.

Morris hopes folks will step forward and help with fundraising but in the meantime he will continue to repair and maintain.  But one man’s dream has become the reality for so many and that is reason alone to contribute to and support WFHB.

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 2: WFHB News Department Summit to be Held in July

By Helen Harrell

The news department at WFHB is ever growing and evolving under the tutelage of WFHB Director Alycin Bektesh, and the upcoming News Summit to be held in July is no exception to her creative planning.  What’s a news summit you wonder?  While summits can of course vary in intent and purpose this one is intended to improve and enhance the WFHB News department.  Many folks including Bektesh and Assistant News Director Joe Crawford have expressed concerns that the news department operates beyond capacity to produce its 20 in-house programs along with managing the traffic for an additional 13 syndicated programs, recruiting and training new volunteers, participating in community outreach, fundraising and keeping updated content on the website and social media.   Bektesh feels that “because we don’t have time enough to allow us to focus on a departmental strategy, any discussion of changes and improvements ends up being superficial.”

In a desire to seriously address the various aspects for needed change, Bektesh has received both WFHB Board of Directors and News and Public Affairs Committee (NPAC) approval to suspend news programming throughout the month of July for a News Summit, allowing four weeks for daily meetings to narrow focus in brainstorming to action plans.  This effort is also seen as significant by other WFHB staff and long time show producers all of whom will be involved with various workshops throughout the month. A combination of re-runs and short seasonal programs will be used to fill programming time while the Summit is underway.

All WFHB listeners, supporters and volunteers are invited and encouraged to become involved and provide suggestions, new ideas and energy directed toward issues that affect everyone.  Bektesh hopes the result of this major summit will lead to a better trained, more collaborative News Department, a standard system of recruitment and training for incoming volunteers, job descriptions for news staff and producers that accurately match needs and expectations and a clear line of action to increase overall quality.

So folks, this is the time to step up and become involved.  Any and all suggestions will be considered and your participation will be greatly appreciated (and needed). The time commitment expectation is similar to that of any given volunteer’s current responsibilities and duties.   Bektesh said, “I want our declaration of being a community newsroom to be absolutely genuine and this is the opportunity to make it so!”  Hope to hear from all of you and see you in July!!

Here is the link to submit a workshop idea:

https://docs.google.com/a/wfhb.org/forms/d/11po1JniAz3RTB_dMNUi1ycKHwp0HlHl5P2y1GfkN1Gw/viewform

For questions and/or further information email:  news@wfhb.org

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 2: Summertime… and the Livin’ is Easy

By Maryll Jones

It’s that time of the year when the temporary residents have left Bloomington for a few months and the townies take their rightful place back on the city streets.  This brings us to one of the largest social gatherings in the area – the weekly Bloomington Farmers’ Market.  Held at the Showers Common  outside City Hall at 7th and Morton streets every Saturday throughout the season, the farmer’s market is a large venue that includes farmers, food vendors, information booths, buskers and stage performers all of whom are peddling their wares to the customers that attend from the surrounding area.  Thousands of folks attend every Saturday from April to November.

What better place to promote WFHB than at the market?  The brain-child of WFHB volunteers Tilman Piedmont, Joe Estivill and Hondo Thompson nearly 6 years ago, Market LIVE! provides a valuable service to the City but also makes WFHB highly visible to those within the listening area.

What exactly do volunteers with Market LIVE! do?  Volunteers not only answer questions from passers-by and promote the value and power of community radio from the WFHB Market LIVE! booth, they also broadcast a live report from the market every hour at 20 minutes until the hour beginning at 8:40am.

Of the five live segments,  each 3-4 minutes long, two are pre-determined. The first at 8:40am is with market staffer Sasha Divine, who provides a market preview, including what is new that week at the market.  The final interview at 12:40pm is usually with Robin Hobson, Market Master with Bloomington Parks and Recreation.  This final report is a wrap- up of the day’s events and a sneak preview of the next farmer’s market the following Saturday.

The remaining three interviews are the responsibility of the volunteers who have free reign with only a few guidelines.  These guidelines include trying to obtain an interview from a different area of the market for each segment so that the interviews are as diverse as they can be.  The areas include farmers, food vendors, Info Alley, buskers, shoppers and whatever event happens to be going on at the Showers Plaza.

As Market LIVE!’s producer Hondo Thompson said “If you can’t be at the market, we’ll bring the market to you.”

Presently, Market LIVE! is in search of 2 – 3 volunteers to join the small team of roving reporters who will serve as knowledgeable representatives of WFHB to the public at large.  Training will be provided. Some desired qualities include: commitment of 1-2 Saturdays a month through November, ability to work alone or with limited supervision, comfortable doing LIVE, impromptu, unscripted broadcasts with a variety of people, ability to represent WFHB in a professional, positive manner, all while staying within the guidelines of the FCC.

Some of the perks include learning to be an effective live broadcast reporter, becoming an ambassador for WFHB to the public, experiencing the fantastic commodities of the market first hand, and getting to hang out with great people.

Having volunteer staff trained and ready to do live representation at other community events is also a huge asset to WFHB.  So if you are interested in developing live, unscripted broadcasting skills and love to hang out and meet new people,  please contact hondo@wfhb.org for more information and…

Come join the WFHB Market LIVE! band of roving reporters!

See you at the market!

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 2: Democracy and Pot Luck at WFHB’s Annual Meeting

By Michael Glab

They’re fighting for democracy in any number of hot spots on the globe, but we’ve got it right here in Bloomington. The volunteer membership of WFHB will vote on new Board of Directors members Saturday, June 7, at the station’s annual meeting.

“Electing our board leadership is the most important thing you can do if you really care about this station,” former General Manager Chad Carrothers advised the membership prior to last year’s meeting. “You earn a vote with your volunteer hours, so use it!”

The WFHB family passes in and out of the cramped Firehouse Radio studios on 4th Street throughout the year but many of us rarely get the chance to see each other

The annual meeting is a chance for more than 200 WFHB volunteers to rub shoulders with board members, staffers and station supporters. It’s the biggest radio party of the year.

This year’s meeting begins with the traditional potluck lunch before Board president Joe Estivill bangs the gavel. Current General Manager Cleveland Dietz  II notes that the candidates will participate in a pre-meeting panel discussion this year rather than the traditional informal meet-and-greet. “It would be hard to give each candidate time for a short speech followed by questions and answers and have the meeting move along in a timely manner,” Dietz says. “Having a panel discussion beforehand, with questions provided by the membership, will help the official meeting move at a more manageable pace while not sacrificing the opportunity to ask candidates questions.”

Dietz says, “It’s a bit of an unusual election this year with a number of petition candidates.” Board members Matt Pierce, Carolyn VandeWiele, and Richard Fish are not running for re-election so three spots will be open. The panel discussion, moderated by News Director Alycin Bektesh, will begin at 11am.

Last year, Maria McKinley and Kevin Jones were elected to the Board. [Jones has since left the Board.]  The terms of the nine Board members are staggered to prevent upheaval.

Estivill says the 2013 annual meeting drew some 60 voting volunteers.

Get to the Monroe County History Center early this year so you won’t miss out on the good food and important politicking. This is the second year the annual meeting is being held at the MCHC at Washington and 6th Streets. For years WFHB’s annual meetings had been held in the Waldron Arts Center Rose Firebay, the largest performance space in the station’s home building. But, as Dietz explains Ivy Tech would prefer to reserve the Rose Firebay for revenue-generating events.

Attending members get to hear all the station’s business and news in the past year. The General Manager not only gives a report on his activities but Dietz will present a report on WFHB’s finances over the previous 12 months in addition to a forecast of the station’s money situation for the next year. Music and News directors Jim Manion and Alycin Bektesh will present their reports.

Then the real fun begins. As always, station staffers will present awards, including “Programmer of the Year,” the News Department’s “MacGyver Award” honoring excellence through innovation, “Rookie of the Year,” “Board Member of the Year,” and “Volunteer of the Year” to deserving recipients.

Following tradition, Music Director Jim Manion will distribute swag including CDs, T-shirts and other mementos to the crowd.

After the winning Board candidates have been announced the floor is opened for general discussion. Volunteers are welcome to make observations or ask questions about anything to do with Firehouse Radio. It’s your time to speak your mind.

Board President Joe Estivill again reminds volunteers and the interested public that the minutes of the annual meeting as well as all other Board parleys throughout the year are published promptly on the WFHB website.

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 1: Introducing the Firehouse News

by Michael G. Glab

Welcome to the first issue of the Firehouse News. Written, compiled, and edited by volunteers with the cooperation of WFHB staffers and Board of Directors, Firehouse News brings you inside information about Bloomington’s community radio station.

Firehouse News is a key component of a multi-front effort to bring transparency to our station. We’ll tie in with WFHB’s main website, as well as Facebook and Twitter pages, and the Google groups Spot-Online and Spot-Unleashed. Using these tools, we’ll create a comprehensive and thorough look at all aspects of our community-run, community-owned broadcasting and online operation.

Our articles, profiles, and news items will serve not only the hundreds of active WFHB volunteers, but will help introduce Firehouse Broadcasting to tens of thousands more people in our coverage area, including the Indiana University campus. The more people who get to know about WFHB and its people, the more our volunteer army will grow. With that will come fresh new ideas for programming, exciting new on-air and production talent, and a more involved listener base.

In this first issue, we introduce you to some of the key people who bring grassroots radio programming to our corner of South Central Indiana. They’ll tell us about new developments in programming, challenges in airing music, news and spoken word entertainment in a non-profit environment, and long-term station goals and strategies.

Firehouse News will bring you reports from the Music, News, Engineering, and Volunteer departments. We’ll present the General Manager’s report. We’ll have profiles of volunteer staff and paid staff. We’ll present informative features on the many faces of WFHB. This newsletter will be your lifeline to community radio in South Central Indiana.

Now, when you need to find out about the nuts-and-bolts of a non-profit, community radio operation, you can turn to us. We’ll provide links to the WFHB station bylaws, the activities of its Board of Directors, the Firehouse Broadcasting Strategic Plan, and even our station budget.

Regular issues of Firehouse News will arrive in your inbox four times a year with special issues published at various times. For instance, we already are working on a special issue to cover the upcoming Board of Directors election, the Spring Fund Drive, and the Acoustic Roots Festival. Subscribe to Firehouse News. Tell your friends and family about us. Be a part of Bloomington’s community radio family!

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 1: Meet the New General Manager

by Helen Harrell

If you haven’t met new WFHB General Manager Cleveland Dietz, you should consider stopping by the station to introduce yourself. You won’t be sorry that you did. Cleveland is a friendly, upbeat person always eager to share his insights about the station and plans for future growth. On board for just a few months now, Cleveland has stepped into his position like an old pro. Of course, his stints as part of the News Department’s volunteer staff, then Administrative Assistant, then Interim General Mnaager following the departure of Chad Carrothers did afford him some time to get a feel for the station and its extensive crew consisting of both paid staff and volunteer staff. Even with all that he observed, he still wanted the job, so kudos to him and lucky for WFHB!

While working with an extensive cast of Bloomingtonians can be equated with herding cats, Cleveland is unflappable. He has some serious goals that he believes will further legitimize the station by creating a more stable environment and context for future development. Here are just a few:

  1. developing organizational documents by creating, re-instituting, or revising an employee handbook, a volunteer code of conduct and board operations manual
  2. developing a clear marketing plan to make WFHB more of a presence regionally and continue to promote the station at IU and in Bloomington
  3. affording more opportunities for volunteers by matching skills and talents with station needs
  4. hiring a Development Director within the next few months
  5. increasing financial donations
  6. increasing staff, volunteer staff, and program development

Whew!

Considering all that Cleveland envisions, he is quick to point out that some of these improvements have already been accomplished or are underway. Upbeat as he talks about the 3-5 year WFHB Strategic Plan, he notes that a new website has been launched and is being updated on a regular basis. Money has been raised to hire a Development Director and that position should be filled by the end of the station’s fiscal year in June. Improving promotions on-air is in progress; for example, the music show DJs will soon begin promoting the next DJ coming up and the development of pre-recorded promos for music shows is soon to be underway. A new camera will enable the News Department to post photos and video to the website and adding video to music broadcasts is in the development stages. New TalentPods and headset mics are now in use. The Facilities Committee is focusing on improving space either through renovation or possible relocation. Four news department stations have recently been created, providing more capacity for volunteer staff in the news department and affording paid news staff more privacy when confidentiality issues arise. And finally, not only have monthly volunteer meetings been successfully re-instituted, but volunteers have been renamed volunteer staff to recognize the significance of their contributions.

Considering all that is happening, changing, developing, it seems that WFHB is in good hands with Cleveland Dietz at the helm. We look forward to the future!

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 1: About the News Department

by Michael G. Glab

Alycin Bektesh signed up as a volunteer in the News Department in the winter of 2010. She became Assistant News Director in June 2011 and was named News Director in November of that year. Here is a true WFHB success story. She has described her paid staff position as her “dream job.” She’ll be our source for new developments in the News Department.

News News:

Bektesh in recent months has overseen the move of reporters from their old cramped quarters to a more spacious area where the station’s old vinyl library used to stand. “I’m so excited about our new newsroom,” she says.

The new newsroom can comfortably seat three working reporters and a producer or audio engineer, all in front of their own computer work stations. Bektesh says this helps greatly with the communication flow as deadlines approach. “People had to communicate via emails and walking around the building trying to find each other,” she says. “We could all have been here at the same time and never really be able to interact with each other.”

The move also benefits the Music Department, which now can use the small production studio at any time for unscheduled live performances. Under the old set-up, the News Department reserved that studio for post-production and editing.

Bektesh has welcomes aboard Drew Daudelin to manage much of the work that goes into the Daily Local News. “Drew oversees copy editing and production of the script,” she says. Daudelin pitched the idea of the position to her. He works each weekday afternoon and can work directly with new volunteer news reporters, getting them up to speed, and ensuring their output approaches Associated Press standards.

Speaking of high standards, Bektesh recently submitted more than 20 audio clips to the Indiana Society of Professional Journalists for the organization’s 2014 awards. The ceremony will be in Indianapolis this spring. WFHB’s entries include clips from the Daily Local News, Bring It On!, Interchange, and others.

The News Department now has a staff of three dedicated feature writers. The Daily Local News includes an 8-minute in-depth feature concentrating on a specific issue. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford has produced features on historic preservation and other city and county issues. He and reporters Lauren Glapa and Casey Kuhn each must produce at least one feature per week.

With Zorba Paster On Your Health‘s annual syndication fee rising considerably on an annual basis, the News and Public Affairs Committee opted to cancel WFHB’s weekly presentation of the program. Bektesh has put the call out for a replacement produced locally and concentrating on medical issues specific to South Central Indiana. “My hope and dream is to have a local medical reporting program following the model of EcoReport.”

A programming note: A repeat of the Brown County Hour now can be heard on Wednesdays at 6 p.m. BCH runs the first Sunday morning of each month, with the repeat airing three evenings later.

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 1: About the Music Department

by Michael G. Glab

Jim Manion has been part of the WFHB family since the station was only dreamed about by a few community radio lovers in Bloomington. He was there for the first concert held at The Bluebird to benefit the as-yet unnamed station in July, 1975. He was on staff when the station finally got its FCC okay in 1992. Manion was Program Director until the News Department was established in the early 2000s. At that time, his title changed to Music Director. He’s held that office ever since. He’ll be our source for our regular coverage of Music Department happenings.

Music News:

Under Manion, the WFHB Music Department has become a force in South Central Indiana. “After 20 years, we’re highly recognized by the music industry from major labels down to thousands of indie record companies,” he says. Manion’s mailbox is packed with CDs every day. They’re sent by bands and labels hoping to get their music before WFHB’s sophisticated and discerning listeners. Manion has delegated much of the previewing work to a stable of community Genre Directors. He sorts the piles of CDs each day and funnels them to an appropriate director. The flood is so overwhelming that WFHB cannot even accept certain submissions. “A lot of independent bands and labels think they can send us an email with a link to their album or track. We just don’t have time for that,” he says. Here are the volunteers who listen to each and every new submission the station receives:

  • Cathi Norton (assisted by Bob Kissel) — Blues
  • Markus Lowe — Electronica
  • Brother William Morris – Jazz
  • Adrian Pontecorvo — World
  • Jamie Gans — Bluegrass & Celtic
  • Janet Martin, Rachel Weidner, and Stephanie Foreman — Indie/Alternative
  • Liza Pavelich — Local

Each of the Genre Directors can okay a disc to be played on air. Manion only asks that they tip him off to noteworthy or particularly good records.

WFHB boasts a line-up of around 100 on-air DJs and music show hosts. Their air shifts can be weekly or even monthly. The Bloomington area offers a deep pool of talent for Manion to choose from. “We live in a music-centric town,” he says. “I really trust our DJs and our Genre Directors to make choices.”

Manion says he’s been traveling recently and has had a chance to listen to other community radio stations. They’re good, he admits, but none of them is WFHB. “We don’t feel under any pressure to have our charts conform to what anybody else is doing,” he says.

He adds: “I’m proud of what we do. We’re egalitarian. Everyone has a strong hand in what goes on the air.”

A one-time WFHB DJ named Mark Harrison used to open his show by saying he’d be “bringing you music old and new, strange and familiar.” Manion has appropriated that saying for the entire WFHB Music Department.

Local Live airs Wednesday nights and features, of course, the sounds of the Bloomington area’s many bands. The program first aired in 2007 with Manion as the coordinator and producer. Abe Morris replaced Manion for a spell and now the show is in the capable hands of Nicole O’Neill.

WFHB often showcases touring bands who stop by before playing at one of Bloomington’s live venues. Manion had been coordinating these appearances but turned the reins over to Katie Moulton in February. These special programs are called Firehouse Sessions. Moulton will host the shows from now on, as well. “That’s what we do here,” Manion says,” We find and promote local on-air talent.”

Manion is wrapping up production of Volume Four of WFHB’s Local Live series. The CD will be out in time for the April fund drive and will be a highly sought-after premium for donors.

Firehouse News, Vol. 1, No. 1: Volunteering at WFHB

by Michael G. Glab

Kelly Wherley‘s been a WFHB volunteer for more than a decade. Coming aboard when Chad Carrothers was the News Director, Kelly started out producing Voices in the Street for the Daily Local News, a task he handles to this day. He can be heard anchoring the DLN on Wednesdays and playing music on alternating Fridays (check the Program Guide for Kelly’s show times). These days, Kelly also serves at the station’s Volunteer Coordinator, helping some 200 local folks make WFHB the sound of South Central Indiana.

Becoming a WFHB volunteer couldn’t be easier. “Prospective volunteers must attend New Volunteer Orientation, 11 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month at the station,” he says. Many volunteers do their bit by manning the front desk or helping out with administrative and office duties. Then there are those who dream of becoming the voice behind the music, heard by Hoosiers across out coverage area. “Anybody who’d like to be a DJ must take two classes: Radio Basics with Richard Fish and Mixology 101 with Music Director Jim Manion,” Kelly says. “If they’re interested in the News Department, they work with Alycin Bektesh on training and getting involved with that.”

Richard Fish’s Radio Basics session is a lot of fun, so much so that people often have attended it again, just to hear Rich’s stories of his many decades in broadcasting. And you’ll even get to see how a radio station’s Emergency Broadcast System works.

Jim Manion walks prospective DJs through lessons on the sound board and good radio delivery and technique. He also explains the various charting responsibilities each on-air music announcer has. Playing music on the air is plenty of hard work, but for those who believe they were born to DJ, well worth it.

Aspiring news hounds can learn basic journalistic practices as well as the mechanics of recording interviews from Alycin Bektesh. The News Department has openings every day, Monday through Friday, for script writers. Reporters often can get a crack at the microphone as fill-ins for regular news readers.

“We have a lot of opportunities for volunteers,” Kelly says. “Folks can email me, General Manager Cleveland Dietz, Alycin, or Jim for more specifics. Plus, we’re always on the lookout for desk jockeys!”

Kelly leads monthly Volunteer Roundtable Meetings with Cleveland and Markus Lowe. They follow New Volunteer Orientations, the first Saturday of each month, beginning at 12:15 p.m. “The roundtables serve as an opportunity for existing volunteers to talk among themselves about issues that we often don’t have time for during the station’s quarterly meetings. Volunteers need to read Spot-Online for details on where the meeting will be held from month to month.”

The WFHB Volunteer Committee, with Kelly as a member, meets every Monday to discuss how to make the volunteer experience easier and more rewarding. The committee currently is revising and updating the station’s volunteer manual so new and prospective volunteers will have a complete understanding of what it means to work at WFHB. “People can get quite a lot out of volunteering, including course credits, professional development, and the kind of satisfaction that comes with being a part of our community and serving it through WFHB,” Kelly says.

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