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Bollywood Film Based In Bloomington To Begin Filming Soon

A Bollywood film crew is set to begin production on a new movie based in Bloomington. The producers of the film, tentatively titled “7 Hindustani,” got permission October 7 to reserve some parking spaces downtown. Alana Rossein, the line producer of the film, explained to the Bloomington Board of Public Works the crew needs the spaces for equipment and location.

Rossein went on to say scenes will be filmed at Kilroy’s on Kirkwood and on South Washington Street among other locations.

“We want to show Bloomington to people who have never seen this place before,” Rossein says.

The chief producer, Anil Kapoor, also took questions from the Board.

Kapoor is one of the most well-known Bollywood actors, having appeared in dozens of films over the past 35 years. Kapoor has also appeared in movies such as Slumdog Millionaire and the TV series, “24.” Kapoor commented on Bloomington’s city government.

“I’ve never seen something like this in local government,” Kapoor says. “It’s something I want to take back to where I live. You are all so civil and professional, even about the most minute details like noise and trash.”

The Board later approved the request to reserve parking spaces. Shooting is expected to begin later this month and continue through mid-November.

Daily Local News – October 8th, 2014 (Blomington Transit Bus Service is running through the freezing conditions – 布卢明顿巴士已启动寒冷运行系统)

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Blomington Transit Bus Service is up and running through the freezing conditions today and all lines are relatively on time and all routes are operating on the normal break schedule-布卢明顿巴士已启动寒冷运行系统,所有的线路都比较准时,都在正常的休息时间表运行.

BloomingOUT – August 21, 2014

Monroe County (Bloomington IN) Circuit Court (sixth seat) Judge Valeri Haughton discusses marriage equality and racism. IU alum, former WFHB volunteer, journalist and activist Delphine Criscenzo talks about black women living in suburbia as well as racial violence in general. Classic and neo-burlesque performer Tessa Von Twinkle chats about the art of burlesque performance and her upcoming performances in Bloomington IN, Nashville, IN and New Orleans, LA.

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Board Engineers Jasmine Mallet & Olivia Davison
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Them Music Mikial Robertson

Bloomington Aims to Be the Next US City to Place Restrictions on Single-Use Plastic Bags

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The Center for Sustainable Living in Bloomington has put together a committee to try and reduce the number of single-use plastic bags in the city. Hundreds of cities and towns in the US have already enacted some sort of restrictions on the bag. Correspondent Harrison Wagner speaks with Center for Sustainable Living board member Jeanne Leimekuler on the Bloomington effort and Commissioner Dan Saltzman of the City Council of Portland on the effects in his city for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

IU, After Local Pressure, Alters Plan To Demolish 6 Historic Houses

Indiana University will be deciding this week on the fate of six historic Bloomington houses.

Last year, IU announced plans to build a new law school facility on land currently occupied by Phi Gamma Delta fraternity house, commonly known as FeeGee. IU agreed to build a new facility for the fraternity on the 800 block of E 8th St which is part of the University Courts historic district. The area has been placed on the state historic register since 1992 and on the national historic register since 2007.

Alarm over IU’s demolition plan of the homes prompted the City of Bloomington to place the district on its list of local historic districts this spring. This designation requires city approval for any development plan in the area, but there is dispute as to whether state owned property would be exempt from the city purview. A legal opinion solicited by Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana found credible argument for the designation to apply to the demolition of the eight street homes even though they are owned by IU.

Beyond the legal rights, IU has come under considerable pressure from the local residents, the Historic Preservation Commission of the City, members of City Council and the Mayor, to preserve the houses slated for demolition, and according to an agenda released today, IU seems to have listened.

The IU Trustees Facilities Committee will be looking at a new proposal that would move four of the houses a block to the west, while still demolishing two properties. Philip Eskew, an IU trustee and chair of Facilities Committee, explains what prompted the alteration of the plan.

“We’ve worked with the mayor, the council and the historical group in Bloomington to listen to their concerns,” Eskew says. “We are recommending to the trustees that we change what we had initially said tearing down the houses and instead move the four worthy of being saved.”

Eskew affirmed that the university believes that it has the legal right to dispose of the houses any way it sees fit.

A bill introduced into the Indiana legislature earlier this year by local state representative Matt Pierce would have required public institutions seeking to demolish, move or change the exterior of a university building within a historic preservation district to obtain a certificate of appropriateness before commencing work.

In Bloomington, it would be the City’s Historic Preservation Commission that would control the certification process. However, the bill failed to make it to the floor of the House in time for passage during this year’s session.

Nevertheless, the local pressure seems to have had some impact on IU.

“There were several groups, even neighbors, that spoke about the tearing down of the houses,” Eskew says. “I think this is a reaction to that and we’re trying to be good neighbors with the community, as we always have been.”

The meeting of the trustees that will be addressing this item will be on the South Bend Campus of IU.

Eskew says the committee will make a recommendation and act on the action items.

The Facilities Committee of the Trustees meeting on Thursday will be from 3:15 to 5 p.m. The full Trustees meeting on Friday will be from 12:45 to 2 p.m. Both will be in combined rooms 221, 223 and 225 of the Student Activity Center of IU South Bend. Both meetings are open to the public.

Income tax may raise to support juvenile services

The Monroe County Council showed support for raising a local income tax April 8. But the council pushed for the tax to cover even more expenses than it already does, raising questions that led the council to delay a vote on the issue. The tax is known as the Juvenile County Option Income Tax. It originally supported only the county’s Youth Services Bureau.

But in recent years the county has also used the tax to pay for juvenile probation officers. Now, Council President Geoff McKim said the council would also like to use the tax revenue for maintenance and other expenses.

“We decided to broaden the scope of the expenses that we would consider could be paid out of the juvenile county option income tax,” McKim says, “I created a committee to work with courts, YSB and the commissioners office to come up with a more accurate accounting of the costs of running our juvenile facilities.”

At a recent work session, Circuit Court Judge Steve Galvin asked the council to increase the tax. But he said his request, which would have brought the tax as high as .085 percent, needs to be increased even further.

“We presented what we thought were the bare budget amounts necessary to provide for juvenile services,” Galvin says, “However we didn’t include amounts for utilities, repairs, maintenance, security and other one-time expenses over the next five years. So we added those in and suggested a rate, but the rate is entirely up to the council.”

If the council agreed to Galvin’s request, it would nearly double the rate for that particular tax. Under the proposed rate, a county resident who earns $30,000 next year would pay $28.58 towards the juvenile services.

Legislative Update, February 2014

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On February 1st, local legislators sat down to summarize recent activities in the statehouse in one of their quarterly legislative updates. Speakers included: Bob Heaton, Peggy Mayfield, Eric Cook, Matt Pierce and Mark Stoops. This event was recorded on location at the Showers Building by Community Access Television Services for Standing Room Only on WFHB.

New Area Code Coming to Bloomington Area

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A new ten-digit area code system will be implemented for residents in Indiana’s 812 area code region on September 6, 2014.

On March 1, residents will still be able to use the 812 area code, but should start using 10 digits when they make a call.

Spokesman for the Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor Anthony Swinger explains why a new area code change is being implemented.

“It’s important to keep in mind that 930 is just being added to the 812 area,” Swinger says, “Anyone with an 812 number right now will keep his or her number after the change. The 930 numbers are going to be added after October 6. The reason for the new area code is because the 812 area code, which has stayed unchanged since 1947, is close to running out of numbers. The industry projects that in the middle of 2015, 812 will no longer have any numbers for new phones and customers. So, it’s necessary to add the new area code so there’s a large enough pool of numbers.”

The dialing system will help usher in the new 930 area code, which will take effect in the fall.

The new area code is being added using what is called the overlay method. Swinger says this method has been used by 37 states in the U.S. for area code change-overs since 2008.

The discussion to use an overlay or a split method was a year-long case that the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission ordered in July 2013.

After the case closed, the IURC decided that the overlay method would be the least disruptive. Swinger explains how the new system will affect residents in the 812 region.

“The changes will affect everyone to one degree or another,” Swinger says, “The main way the changes will affect folks in Bloomington and south central Indiana will be the need for 10 digit dialing for local calls. Instead of just dialing 7 digits, it will be necessary to dial 812 than the seven digits. What begins Saturday is a six month period to adjust to 10 digit dialing. If the old habit comes up in this grace period, the number will still go through.”

On September 6, residents can continue to use the 812 area code but will have to use ten digits to make a call. When October 6 rolls around, residents will have to begin using the new 930 area code and continue to use ten digits to place a call.

Aerial Photos of Bloomington Approved for Property Assessment

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The Monroe County Commission approved a $271,000 contract on February 21 with a company that plans to take aerial photographs of the entire County.

The company, Pictometry International Corporation, would fly over the area to take high-resolution pictures for the County Assessor’s office.

Assessor Judy Sharp said one way her staff uses images like these is to detect changes in properties, which can affect their assessed value and in turn their property taxes.

“This is the third time we’ve done this,” Sharp said, “We fly over every three years because Monroe County is such a fast-growing community. In three years, you have a lot of new product out there. This company can actually tell us the changes, good or bad, to a piece of property”

Sharp said the contract, which covers three years, includes a stipulation that prevents the public from accessing the photographs.

“It is strictly in the assessor’s office,” Sharp said, “The city police could use this, but it isn’t a tool just anyone use because it’s licensed. You can go online at our 39 degrees GIS website which does something very similar, but it isn’t what we use.”

The commission voted unanimously to approve the agreement.

Bloomington Approves New Commercial Building At 3rd and Washington

On Feb. 10 the Bloomington Plan Commission approved a plan for a new building downtown that would include a convenience store. The four-story building would also contain three apartments and room for additional businesses.

The new structure is planned for the southwest corner of 3rd and Washington streets, on a site that has most recently been the location of a laundromat, CrossTown Cleaners. Doug Bruce, who has done architecture work on the project, said the owner’s idea is for the convenience store to serve people waiting for buses downtown.

The building is owned by Song Kim, who also owned the laundromat. It is just north of the current Bloomington Transit building, and it’s just east of the new Transit building under construction at 3rd and Walnut streets. Commission member Pat Williams asked how deliveries to the convenience store could affect nearby traffic.

The site is smaller than most downtown lots, and Bruce said there would be no room for large trucks to pull in. Williams said she is skeptical about the delivery plan.

Trish Sterling, who owns a commercial building just southeast of the proposed store, said she is also concerned about the building’s effects on traffic and parking. The plan for the four-story building includes seven parking spaces. Sterling said her building’s spaces are already used frequently by other businesses.

A lack of parking in the area caused the failure of a recent project just two blocks east of the proposed store. The owners of the Taste of India restaurant on 4th Street tried to relocate to 314 East 3rd Street, but the commission rejected the plan largely because there wasn’t enough parking. Commission member Chris Smith addressed Sterling’s concerns, but said the city would like to see the site developed and they have limited options.

The commission later voted to approve the building, including six different waivers from the city’s zoning rules.

 

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