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EcoReport – America Recycles Day

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In today’s EcoReport feature, we hear about Bloomington’s national recognition for its recycling efforts, and get listeners ready to celebrate America Recycles Day, coming up this Friday.

EcoReport – November 14, 2013

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In today’s EcoReport feature, we hear about Bloomington’s national recognition for its recycling efforts, and get listeners ready to celebrate  America Recycles Day, coming up this Friday.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Anchors: Kelly Miller and Stephanie Stewart
This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene, Norm Holy, Stephanie Stewart, and Dan Young. This week’s feature was engineered by Alycin Bektesh. This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee. Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Data Released on Effectiveness of Indiana Higher Education

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Last Week the Indiana Higher Education Commission published a report showing data from all of Indiana’s public colleges, and their “return on investment” to students. Correspondent Casey Kuhn spoke with Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers about the content of the report, and how it could be useful for Hoosier students, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Daily Local News – November 13, 2013

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As the weather gets colder, low-income households in Brown, Monroe, Morgan, and Owen counties now have the option to apply for help with winter fuel costs; Members of the Ellettsville Town Council suggested yesterday that they might vote to allow chickens within town limits; The Bloomington/Monroe County Metropolitan Planning Organization is the most recent local body to officially complain about widespread erosion problems caused by Interstate 69 construction.

FEATURE
Data Released on Effectiveness of Indiana Higher Education
Last Week the Indiana Higher Education Commission published a report showing data from all of  Indiana’s  public colleges, and their “return on investment” to students. Correspondent Casey Kuhn spoke with Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers about the content of the report, and how it could be useful for Hoosier students, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE!
There’s been a lot of confusion as the Affordable Care Act kicks in, and a WHOLE lot of scams. Here’s what you need to know, and here’s how to spot the fraudsters.

CREDITS
Anchors: Cathi Norton and Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by Casey Kuhn,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services.
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish with correspondent Anson Shupe,
Alycin Bektesh produced our feature.
Our engineer was Jim Lang,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Standing Room Only – Lee Hamilton: A Conversation about Iran

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On Thursday, October 17th Former Congressman Lee Hamilton discussed the prospect of diplomacy with Iran. Lee H. Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. From 1965 to 1999 he served Indiana in the U.S. House of Representatives, where his chairmanships included the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Select Committee to Investigate Covert Arms Transactions with Iran. The event was open to the public and included a Question and Answer period. This event was recorded on location at the Monroe County Public Library by Community Access Television Services for Standing Room Only, on WFHB.

 

Bloomington Beware! – Healthcare Scams

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There’s been a lot of confusion as the Affordable Care Act kicks in, and a WHOLE lot of scams. Here’s what you need to know, and here’s how to spot the fraudsters.

Interchange – The Airbrushed Woman: Feminism and Women’s Magazines

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Host Alycin Bektesh speaks with Jennifer Maher, Senior Lecturer in Gender Studies at Indiana University. The discussion covers feminism, female depictions in media, and pop culture’s reaction to female sexuality, using Jennifer Nelso’s Airbrushed Nation as a framework for understanding the falsities of women’s magazines and mass media.

Body found on Hillside Drive

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The Bloomington Police Department reports that a dead female’s body was  found on Hillside Drive, at High Street. Captain Joe Qualters says they found the body after 1:45 p.m. and that preliminary reports show no foul play. The identity of the body has not been determined.

Captain Qualters says the department has not received reports of anyone with this description missing, and commented on whether or not she is believed to be a local resident.

The Police Department expects to release more information on the body in the coming hours with an autopsy scheduled tomorrow.

Historic conservation districts adjust to new ordinance

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The Bloomington City Council debated last week on a new ordinance that will affect the city’s historic conservation districts.

These districts are established to regulate construction and demolition, in order to prevent radical change in the affected neighborhoods. They are often supported by homeowners who oppose large new student housing complexes, or other developments that locals believe would negatively affect the neighborhood.

But the new city ordinance would force conservation districts to become even more restrictive after three years, by elevating them to full-fledged historic districts.

City Attorney Patty Mulvehill said the new rule would bring the city into compliance with the state law.

The potential change means that the city’s two conservation districts, in the McDoel Gardens and Prospect Hill neighborhoods, will automatically become full historic districts.

In those districts, all changes to the exterior of structures would have to be approved by the city’s Historic Preservation Commission.

Council member Chris Sturbaum, who represents the district that includes Prospect Hill, said the change is unfortunate but necessary.

“This isn’t something that people who selected the conservation district wanted. They wanted the district in a way of protecting their neighborhood with the lightest kind of restriction on what they can do to their property,” Sturbaum said, “This is changing, and this is not something anyone wanted to happen, it just happened when we understood that we were outside the strict regulation.”

The Matlock Heights neighborhood on the north side of the city is currently working to become a conservation district.

Council member Susan Sandberg, who lives in the neighborhood, said her neighbors are prepared to deal with the new law.

“Matlock Heights knows what they have to do to maintain their conservation statues, and they’re fairly confident that they will have the votes and the community interest to maintain the level they were comfortable with.”

A majority of property owners would have to vote in favor of keeping the conservation district to prevent its elevation to a full historic district. Sturbaum said he supports the idea of conservation districts, and worries that new restrictions could make neighborhoods hesitant to seek the designation.

“Our regret was the harm that would be done to the tool that would preserve these neighborhoods that would allow change,” Sturbaum said, “We’re going to talk to the state and see if we can’t, over time, do some work on the legislation for the future.”

The council voted unanimously to approve the new city ordinance. Sturbaum asked the city to be patient with the neighborhoods that have been elevated to historic districts against their wishes.

Grant Rejection Has Hints of Politics

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The Indiana Secretary of State’s Office is playing politics with grants that are intended to improve accessibility in the state’s polling places. That’s according to Monroe County Clerk Linda Robbins, who says the office denied the county grant funding for a project that would improve its early voting center. Robbins says the office is not funding any early voting projects this year, apparently because expanding early voting tends to benefit Democrats. Secretary of State Connie Lawson, who is a Republican, denies the decision had anything to do with politics. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford has the story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

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