Lotus Drive
Home > News (page 73)

Category Archives: News

Feed Subscription

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 7

Play

Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

bloomingOUT – December 26, 2013

Play

Special holiday edition that includes an interview with Helen Harrell by IU Journalism student Brittney Jackson about the history of the show. Two editions of Navajo Rainbow with Chair/Professor of Dine’ Studies at Navajo Technical University Wesley Thomas discussing two – spirit tradition and Navajo gender construction as well as the negative effects of western culture on native tradition and language. Featured artist is Native American singer/songwriter Roger Kuhn. Musical selections are “Every Year at Christmas Time” and “I Heard There was a Star.”

www.navajotech.edu/index/php/faculty…dine…/158-wesley-thomas
www.rogerkuhn.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producers Sarah Hetrick & Nick Tumino
News Director Josh Vidrich
Music created by Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick
Guest co-host Victor Kinzer

Best of 2013 #4 – Restricted Access: Indiana Reinterprets Medical Abortions

Play

Indiana Senate Bill 371 easily passed into law this year, but the act, which reclassifies health clinics and imposes unnecessary procedures and counseling to families seeking abortions, has yet to be implemented due to a recent court ordered injunction declaring the law unconstitutional. Today, we look back at the legislators who passed an entire bill aimed to close down a single business, and the Hoosiers who continue to battle for women’s rights.

CREDITS
The best of 2013 is a production of the WFHB news department.
Today’s episode was produced by Alycin Bektesh
Our theme music is provided by Legs
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Best of 2013 #5 – Neighbors Clash Over Trash: The Fight Over A Downtown Garbage Station

Play

Issues surrounding trash and recycling were in the news all year long during 2013. Early this year the local solid waste district expanded its services for rural customers. Then, over the summer, a business that accepted recyclables in downtown Bloomington was forced to close due to financial troubles. And in recent months there has been debate over whether the solid waste district should build a materials recovery facility that would process and sell the waste residents throw away. But none of those issues drew as much attention and controversy as a plan to build a new trash transfer station in a residential neighborhood on the west side of Bloomington. An application to build the station at JB Salvage on West Vernal Pike was filed late in 2012, but the plans weren’t publicly discussed until early this year.

CREDITS
The best of 2013 is a production of the WFHB news department.
Today’s episode was produced by Joe Crawford.
Our theme music is provided by Legs
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

An ambassador’s view of the Syrian conflict.

Play

On Thursday November 7th Former Ambassador to Syria Rajendra Abhyankar provided an overview of the situation and helped audience members understand the complexities of the war, chemical weapons, and UN Resolutions. Indiana University student and Syrian native Rahaf Safi will share viewpoints and anecdotes from her family back home and discuss humanitarian concerns. This event was recorded on location at the Monroe County Public Library by Community Access television services for Standing Room Only, on WFHB.

Best of 2013 #6 – House Joint Resolution 6: the Battle for Marriage Equality in Indiana

Play

The fight for marriage equality reached the boiling point in 2013. From the landmark Supreme Court decisions striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act and deferring to the lower court decision that found the ban of same-sex marriage created by California’s Proposition 8 referendum to be unconstitutional under California law to Maine, Maryland, Washington State, Rhode Island, Delaware, Minnesota, California, New Jersey, Illinois, Hawaii, New Mexico, and most recently, Utah legalizing same-sex marriage in their states, either by legislation, ballot referendum and court decision, the move toward marriage equality gained a massive amount of momentum this year. In 2014, decisions regarding same-sex marriage will be taken up by Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Oregon, Nevada, and Colorado, which could potentially lead to legalization in 24 states and the District of Columbia or nearly half the country. Indiana may be another state where big decisions are made regarding same-sex marriage next year.  On January 30th of 2013, the Indiana House issued Joint Resolution 6. HJR6 proposes amending the Indiana Constitution to define marriage HJR6 states that “Only a marriage between one (1) man and one (1) woman shall be valid or recognized as a marriage in Indiana”. It was supposed to have been voted on earlier this year, but just a month after the United States Supreme Court scheduled oral arguments on the DOMA and Prop 8 cases, the amendment was pushed back to the 2014 legislative session.

CREDITS
The best of 2013 is a production of the WFHB news department.
Today’s episode was produced by Jennifer Whitaker and Alycin Bektesh.
Correspondent Jennifer Whitaker and David Murphy and Producers Cleveland Dietz and Harrison Wagner contributed to today’s reports
Our theme music is provided by Legs
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Big Data Is Watching You

Play

This week on Interchange host Doug Storm presents “Big Data Is Watching You,” a conversation with Colin Allen, Director of the Cognitive Science Program at Indiana University.  Allen is a philosopher of biology and cognitive science and he’s joined us once before on Interchange to talk about the possibilities of machine morality and perhaps rather the necessity of building morality into source codes.  If nothing else, this week’s program should make that at least clear, and clearly an imperative.  Of course we’re stuck with the question, who will craft this ethical code?

We also present here for podcast the unedited conversation which covers more ground and even attempts to explicate Yeats’s “Second Coming” (1919) as an ode to the coming of the Mind of Big Data.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

Of Related Interest:

 

Best of 2013 #7- Indiana stays HIP: the ACA & the Twenty-Nine Hour Work Week

Play

A source of national controversy and the impetus behind the October shutdown of the federal government, the ACA produced two big issues in Indiana. The creation of the 29-hour work week allowed employers to avoid providing health care benefits to part-time workers, and Indiana lawmakers refused to create an Indiana insurance exchange, rejected Federal Medicaid expansion monies, and chose to seek approval for the revamped Healthy Indiana Plan system as an alternative. As 2013 started, businesses, schools, and local governments began looking at ways to implement the requirements of the ACA, slated to go into effect at the beginning of 2014. As early as January, administrators were looking at ways to cut employee hours in order to avoid providing health insurance. Without employer coverage, many of these workers turned to the state, where Mike Pence’s refusal to create a state insurance exchange or to take part in ACA Medicaid expansion is expected to leave at least 400,000 people in poverty without the ability to get insurance even under an expanded Healthy Indiana Plan.

Bring It On! – December 23, 2013

Play

Bev Smith and William Hosea joined Eric Love, Liz Mitchell, and Leila Randle

PART ONE
It’s Christmas time and while last week’s temperature climb and torrential rains melted away all vestiges of snow, we at Bring It On still wanted to gather around the ol’ Yule log and talk about our favorite memories and family traditions for the season.

Joining Bev and William for a special Christmas edition of Bring It On to talk about their favorite Christmas memories and traditions are Eric Love, Liz Mitchell, and Leila Randle.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 6

Play

Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Scroll To Top