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Indiana State AFL-CIO Announces New President

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The Indiana State American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations announced that Brett Voorhies has been elected as their new president. He is now the new leader of a federation of eight hundred local unions, representing more than three hundred thousand working men and women. Voorhies has spent his career working with united steelworkers. Most recently, he was the president of the Central Indiana Labor Council. Jeff Harris, spokesman for the Indiana AFL-CIO, says Voorhies has been a lifetime worker in the labor movement.

Voorhies replaces Nancy Guyott, who was the first woman elected state AFL-CIO president. The former president of the union directed an unsuccessful campaign to block passage of the state’s right-to-work law. But Voorhies says that defeat did not lead to his election.

Joe Breedlove has been re-elected as AFL-CIO secretary-treasurer, the chief financial officer of the organization. Voorhies will serve a four-year term, leading day-to-day operations along with Breedlove.

Daily Local News – December 9, 2013

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The Indiana State American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations announced that Brett Voorhies has been elected as their new president; IU student reports aid Parks Department; The Monroe County Plan Commission voted November 19th to change the name of a road on the far east side of the county; The Monroe County Community School Corporation has seen an increase in students experiencing homelessness; The Bloomington Utilities Service Board approved the final payment December 2nd on a project to repair the Griffy Dam.

FEATURE
Businesses Benefit As Others Suffer From Local Tax Breaks
Two studies released by Ball State University in recent weeks call into question a long-standing, and expensive, strategy that communities throughout the state have used in hopes of creating jobs. Monroe County and the city of Bloomington spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year on the strategy, which involves giving local tax breaks to companies that are new to town. Those companies, in turn, are expected to create new jobs, therefore decreasing the local unemployment rate and improving the local economy. But the study out of Ball State suggests the tax breaks for business are not creating many jobs, and they’re actually increasing the tax rates for regular taxpayers. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford spoke to one of the authors of the study, professor Michael Hicks, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

ACTIVATE!
Joe Yonkman of Home Instead talks about the annual Be a Santa to a Senior program and the need for volunteers to gift wrap the over 2,000 presents donated for area seniors in need this year.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by Yvonne Cheng,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford.
Activate is produced by Jennifer Whitaker,
Our engineer is Chris Martin,
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Local photographers donate portrait sessions

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Blueline Media Productions again partnered with the South Central Community Action Program, to provide a free day of holiday portraits for low-income families in Bloomington on Sunday.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 4

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Daily Local News – December 6 2013

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Indiana State Police say there have been too many car accidents to count, a result of the winter storm that began last night and has continued throughout the day; A report on the trend to privatize government social services painted a particularly harsh picture of Indiana’s contract with IBM; Hamilton Logging has begun logging operations in the most recently sold area of the Morgan Monroe State Forest back-country area, a one hundred-acre piece of the forest set aside in 1981 as one of the most natural, primitive places left in Indiana; Carbon capture and storage, a new approach intended to reduce carbon emission, may face a challenge in gaining public acceptance according to a new study co-authored by Indiana University researchers; Blueline Media Productions is partnering with the South Central Community Action Program, or SCCAP, to provide a free day of holiday portraits for low-income families in Bloomington this Sunday.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Alycin Bektesh, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa, Jalisa Ransom, Yvonne Cheng, and Alycin Bektesh.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer is Nick Tumino,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Voices in the Street – “Merry Chirstmas” vs. “Happy Holidays”

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Our weekly public opinion segment asks Bloomington citizens “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays”?

Demonstrators Support McDonald’s Workers

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McDonald’s workers nationwide are asking for an increased minimum wage, to fifteen dollars an hour. Today workers went on strike in a reported one hundred cities around the country, and many other cities, including Bloomington, held demonstrations in solidarity with the workers. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh was on hand at a demonstration this afternoon, and brings us the story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

EcoReport – Ashley Cranor: Monroe Co. Energy Plan

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Ashley Cranor, grants administrator for the Monroe county government, discusses the County’s community energy plan and its implications for the community.

Daily Local News – December 5, 2013

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The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for Bloomington and the rest of the WFHB listening area, starting at ten o’clock tonight and running through midnight tomorrow night; The Bloomington City Council passed a resolution in support of same-sex marriage yesterday; The Indiana State Police are investigating a Thanksgiving night police shooting that resulted in the death of a Nashville man; Girls Incorporated of Monroe County is hosting their annual Holiday Hoopla this Saturday, from 9 am to 11:30 am.

FEATURE
Demonstrators Support McDonald’s Workers
McDonald’s workers nationwide are asking for an increased minimum wage, to fifteen dollars an hour. Today workers went on strike in a reported one hundred cities around the country, and many other cities, including Bloomington, held demonstrations in solidarity with the workers. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh was on hand at a demonstration this afternoon, and brings us the story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOICES IN THE STREETS
Our weekly public opinion segment.

CREDITS
Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Mike Glab and Jalisa Ransom,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer is Sarah Hettrick.
Drew Daudelin is our News Editor,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Indiana State Police Investigating Shooting That Resulted In Death of Nashville Man

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The Indiana State Police are investigating a Thanksgiving night police shooting that resulted in the death of a Nashville man.

That night, Brown County Sheriff’s deputies and a Nashville Town Marshall’s officer arrived at a home on Annendale Drive in Nashville, after receiving a tip that Troy Harden was there. Harden was wanted on two Bloomington warrants for probation violations.

According to the State Police, the officers located Harden after being let in to the residence. Harden initially resisted arrest and told officers to kill him. One officer deployed his taser after noticing Harden was holding a gun.

Harden managed to escape through a window and the officers proceeded to chase him through a wooded area. Harden eventually emerged on Annendale Drive, where officers managed to successfully tase him. Harden collapsed but pointed his gun at the officers, who responded by shooting him. Two bullets hit Harden and he was declared dead at Columbus Regional Hospital.

State Police investigators found Harden’s gun at the scene of the shooting, as well as meth lab equipment in his truck parked at the Annendale Drive residence. Witnesses told investigators Harden was afraid of going to prison.

After State Police complete their investigation, Brown County Prosecutor Jim Oliver will review the results and determine whether charges should be filed.

 

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