Breaking News
Home > News (page 65)

Category Archives: News

Feed Subscription

Volunteer Connection – October 25, 2013

Play

A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

IU Board Votes “No” to Privitized Parking

Play

The Indiana University Board of Trustees met in Bloomington last week, for two days of committee and business meetings. One agenda item that was ultimately voted down was the proposed outsourcing of parking management, on both Bloomington’s campus and the campus of IU-Purdue in Indianapolis. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh spoke with Patrick Shoulders, the longest serving Board member, about the proposal and the philosophy behind privatizing IU operations, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Daily Local News – October 25, 2013

Play

Online registration ends this Monday for Rachael’s Run for Justice, a 5k run and one mile walk happening next Saturday in Bloomington; The Indiana University School of Optometry has received an in-perpetuity gift from the nonprofit organization Saving Sight Indiana; The contractor repairing the Griffy Dam has fallen further behind on its schedule to complete the project.

FEATURE
IU Board Votes “No” to Privitized Parking
The Indiana University Board of Trustees met in Bloomington last week, for two days of committee and business meetings. One agenda item that was ultimately voted down was the proposed outsourcing of parking management, on both Bloomington’s campus and the campus of IU-Purdue in Indianapolis. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh spoke with Patrick Shoulders, the longest serving Board member, about the proposal and the philosophy behind privatizing IU operations, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell & Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh,
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer is Harrison Wagner,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Local NAACP branch to sponsor open forum about the War on Drugs

Play

Bloomington’s NAACP branch continues to take on the War on Drugs, and its effects on the local black community.

The branch will sponsor a second public forum on the war a week from Tuesday. The NAACP of Monroe County sponsored a first forum in April, during which some three dozen suggestions were generated to solve some of the negative effects of the War on Drugs.

The upcoming forum will consider three of the strongest of those suggestions at its second forum. William Vance, Jr. is president of the Monroe County branch of the NAACP.

“We want to send a message to the community, to law enforcement and anyone that has anything to do with the law that there is a definite disparity in the sentencing of individuals that commit drug crimes,” Vance says, “Why is that? We will get a feel from the community on whether or not the solutions we suggest seem workable.”

Former President Richard Nixon declared the War on Drugs in 1971. The so-called war institutionalized and coordinated drug prohibition efforts on a federal level that began as far back as 1914.

Vance mentions Michelle Alexander’s bestselling book “The New Jim Crow.” In it, Alexander characterizes the War on Drugs as a war on young black men. Vance adds that an in-depth study conducted by the local NAACP branch indicated a pattern of discrimination against young black men moving through the Monroe County court system over the years.

He did say that in his nine years at the helm of the local NAACP, the number of overall discrimination complaints has fallen dramatically, inspiring him to declare Bloomington a relatively good place for blacks to live in.

Still, he says the nationwide War on Drugs has caused collateral damage locally.

“Once you’ve been arrested for a drug offense, whether you’re in there for a year or ten years, it’s almost impossible to assimilate back into society because it’s even more difficult to get a job,” Vance says.

The forum with be held in the Bloomington City Council chambers on Tuesday, November 5, at 7 p.m. Free parking is available in the City Hall lot on North Morton Street.

State law changes regarding historic districts in Bloomington

Play

At a meeting yesterday the Bloomington City Council discussed changing the city’s rules regarding historic districts. Most discussion surrounded a change that city attorney Patty Mulvehill said was required by state law.

Conservation districts are less restrictive to neighborhoods than full historic districts, which require the city’s Historic Preservation Commission to approve all exterior changes to homes. Instead, designating an area as a conservation district is intended to prevent radical changes.

In conservation districts, major events like demolition and new construction require prior review. Several residents of the McDoel Gardens Neighborhood, which is a conservation district, spoke in favor of keeping the city laws as they are. One of those residents was Paul Ash.

“I just wanted to emphasize what an excellent tool this is, it’s not broke, let’s not fix it, let’s just keep going the way we are,” Ash said.

Members of the City Council said they were sympathetic with the residents’ concerns. But member Dorothy Granger said the city didn’t have any other options.

“I agree that what we have is good, and I just want reiterate that the changes we have to make are state changes,” Granger said, “We will work very hard to work very that the people within the conservation districts understand what we have to go through.”

Residents of the city’s three conservation districts will now have to hold a vote to keep their current statuses. Council member Tim Mayer asked Mulvehill to explain the logic behind the state law.

“What I try to explain is that unfortunately what we see in higher level of government is that we see people who have written the law without ever practicing it,” Mulvehill said, “It’s kind of just what we’re stuck with.”

During a straw poll at the end of the meeting, the Council indicated support for the changes in the law. All seven members who were present voted for the change.

Eight Medical Corp. relocates offices to Bloomington

Play

Eight Medical Corporation has relocated its offices from St. Paul, Minnesota to Bloomington. The company is a medical device distributor. Its main device called the Recirculator Eight Point Zero, used to treat cavities.

Dana Palazzo, project manager for Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, says quality of life was a huge factor for the corporation choosing Bloomington.

“If the word gets out that better businesses are coming here to Bloomington, because of the business climate and the tax environment,” Palazzo says, “More businesses will look at Bloomington when they’re choosing relocation.”

Despite the fact that Eight Medical Corporation only has a small office with two full-time employees locally, Palazzo says it still diversifies the community.

“Any new business to Bloomington is a great success,” Palazzo says, “We have pretty robust and diverse industry in the life sciences, from medical devices to pharmaceuticals. New business adds to the knowledge base we have here.”

This move comes as part of the Bloomington Economic Development Corporation’s effort to improve the local life science community.

bloomingOUT – October 24, 2013

Play

Bloomington North High School Counselor Greg Chaffin discusses the additional hardships and academic stressors faced by LGBTQIA teens as a result of bullying and discrimination on a new edition of Youth in Peril. Helen highlights October as pride month on an edition of Queer Herstory.  Founder and President of Indiana Transgender Wellness Alliance and Cummins engineer talks about transitioning on the job as well as support networks developing at the corporate level.

www.indianatransgenderwellness.org

Producer Carol Fischer

Executive producer Alycin Bektesh

Associate Producers Sarah Hetrick and Nick Tumino

News Director Josh Vidrich

Original theme music provided by Mikial Robertson

Announcer Sarah Hetrick

 

Third Annual Bike Summit brings local bike community together to promote safety

Play

The Third Annual Bike Summit, a yearly event the City of Bloomington holds to bring the local bicycle community together, takes place this Saturday. This year’s Summit will focus on education. Vince Caristo, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for Bloomington says they’re trying to raise awareness about the Civil Streets Initiative.

“We need help and participation to get the message out about safety and common courtesy in our streets, our largest public space,” Caristo says.

The city says its goal for the Bike Summit is to improve safety, and to reduce the frustrations and unsafe behaviors that lead to crashes.

“First of all, as more and more people walk and bike in the community, there are a lot of questions about the rights and responsibilities of people in the street and we want to address that,” Caristo says, “Secondly, we want to improve safety in the community. Every year there are about 12,000 crashes in the city and Monroe County and maintaining safe transportation system is always a goal for the city.”

The event begins at 2 p.m. this Saturday at Bloomington City Hall, in the Council Chambers.

 

Indiana University and the Bloomington Homeless

Play

Due to growing concern among students at Indiana University, a number of students have come together to stop the injustices they feel have been committed by their university. These students hold meetings, and some of their testaments have been featured on WFHB’s weekly program The Strike Mic, which usually airs on Tuesdays. Earlier this week a member of the group sat down with us while reading their manifesto to the university and its students, as well as to the IU police force and the Bloomington police force, about the local homeless population, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Daily Local News – October 24, 2013

Play

Bloomington City Council discusses changing the city’s rules regarding historic districts because of a state law; Bloomington’s NAACP branch continues to take on the War on Drugs, and its effects on the local black community with a forum; Eight Medical Corporation has relocated its offices from St. Paul, Minnesota to Bloomington; the Third Annual Bike Summit, a yearly event the City of Bloomington holds to bring the local bicycle community together, takes place this Saturday; this weekend in sports.
FEATURE
Indiana University and the Bloomington Homeless
Due to growing concern among students at Indiana University, a number of students have come together to stop the injustices they feel have been committed by their university. These students hold meetings, and some of their testaments have been featured on WFHB’s weekly program The Strike Mic, which usually airs on Tuesdays. Earlier this week a member of the group sat down with us while reading their manifesto to the university and its students, as well as to the IU police force and the Bloomington police force, about the local homeless population, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOICES IN THE STREETS
Our weekly public opinion feature Voices in the Street asks you about health care.

CREDITS
Today’s headlines were written by Mike Glab, Yin Yuan, and Yvonne Cheng,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley with correspondent Maddie Glenn.
Our feature today was produced by Harrison Wagner,
Our engineer is Sarah Hettrick,
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Scroll To Top