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DNR Hosts Ice Safety Talk on Facebook

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Facebook followers of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources will have the chance to talk about ice safety with Lieutenant William Browne, of DNR Law Enforcement, this Friday on the DNR Facebook page. Dawn Krause, of the DNR Division of Communications, says these talks have been going on for two years, and serve as a link between the department and the public on topics of which some people are unaware.

“It’s a way to also get information out there to people that are unaware of all the different areas the DNR covers,” Krause says, “I find a lot of people that get on with these talks are impressed because they never knew what we covered.”

Krause says the new talk on ice safety should serve as a learning experience for anyone interested in enjoying themselves this holiday season.

“Every year, people want to get out on the ice, and every year people are killed because the ice isn’t actually thick enough or they aren’t aware of how thick the ice should be,” Krause says, “This is a way to re-educate people every year so that they are aware of what kind of ice they should get out on to have a safe experience.”

This will be the last online DNR talk for the year, and Krause says some very popular topics came up in 2013.

“Deer-hunting was popular online,” Krause says.

The talk on ice safety is scheduled to take place from 2 to 3 pm this Friday, December 20th, on the DNR Facebook page. Anyone with a Facebook account can begin sending questions during that time.

Witmer Approved as Monroe County School Resources Officer

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At the December meeting of the Monroe County Community School Corporation’s Board of School Trustees, Jim Witmer was approved as the inaugural School Resources Officer for the district. John Carter, director of planning for MCCSC, told us more on what he will do as school resources officer.

“He’ll be providing resources to staff on mediation training and foster relationships with parents and students and teachers,” Carter says.”The benefits of this are if you have someone in your building that the kids are comfortable telling things to, that’s what you want. For example, threats of violence to other students, sometimes the students know those. We want the students to have every avenue possible to tell us. They could tell a teacher, a counselor, a principal, or even a bus driver. Now we have a school resources officer who is versed in law enforcement and can help.”

A portion of Witmer’s salary will come from a grant from the Indiana Department of Homeland Security, a program added to the Indiana code by the 2013 General Assembly. The code states that a school resource officer may make arrests, conduct search or seizure of property, and carry a firearm on school property. Carter talks about other requirements of the position.

“The state statute has said that the qualifications are important for a school resources officer,” Carter says, “The law enforcement training is the most important. You have to keep up your certifications and go to school resource officer training school. They need to know the difference from being law enforcement and law enforcement in a school setting.”

The matching homeland security grant is on a two-year cycle. Carter says he expects that the school corporation will try to renew it, but that there are no policies in place to measure the effectiveness of the position.

“We hope to keep the school resources officer,” Carter says, “We want to be able to say we feel safer with this extra resource of information to provide to students, parents and staff. That’s probably the biggest benefit.”

Jim Witmer is a 23 year veteran of the Bloomington Police Department and began a campaign for Monroe county sheriff this year.

His campaign website has the following announcement, in relation to his new position: “I am sad to say that in choosing to accept this position, I will need to withdraw from the Monroe County Sheriff’s race. Although I wasn’t able to complete that mission, I feel that nothing is more valuable than our children, and I promise that I will do everything in my power to provide a safe environment for our children to learn and grow.”

Bring It On! – December 16, 2013

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Bev Smith and Cornelius Wright joined Dr. Roderick Paige.

PART ONE
On January 21, 2001, the United States Senate confirmed Dr. Roderick Paige as the 7th U.S. Secretary of Education. For Dr. Paige, the son of a principal and a librarian in public schools, that day was the crowning achievement of a long career in education. Born in 1933 in segregated Monticello, Mississippi, Dr.  Paige’s accomplishments speak of his commitment to education. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Jackson State University in his home state. He then earned both a master’s and a doctoral degree from Indiana University.

Dr. Paige began working with students early in his career as a teacher and a coach. He then served for a decade as dean of the College of Education at Texas Southern University (TSU). In this position, Dr. Paige worked to ensure that future educators would receive the training and expertise necessary to succeed in the classroom. He also established the university’s Center for Excellence in Urban Education, a research facility that concentrates on issues related to instruction and management in urban school systems.

In 1994, Dr. Paige left TSU to become superintendent of HISD, the nation’s seventh largest school district. Inside Houston Magazine named Dr. Paige one of “Houston’s 25 most powerful people” in guiding the city’s growth and prosperity. In 2001, he was named National Superintendent of the Year by the American Association of School Administrators.

During his tenure as Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education from 2001 to 2005, Dr. Paige was a fierce and innovative champion of education reform who led the way in setting new standards of achievement for all students in our education system. He spearheaded the implementation of the historic No Child Left Behind Act, with its goal of reinvigorating America’s education system. Dr. Paige Cornelius and Bev by phone this evening to shed some light on his illustrious career.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith and Cornelius Wright
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Daily Local News – December 16, 2013

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At the December meeting of the Monroe County Community School Corporation’s Board of School Trustees, Jim Witmer was approved as the inaugural School Resources Officer for the district; Facebook followers of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources will have the chance to talk about ice safety with Lieutenant William Browne, of DNR Law Enforcement, this Friday; Last week the Bloomington Plan Commission heard a request to build a four-story building alongside the downtown B-Line Trail, to include thirty-five high-end apartments and condos; Governor Mike Pence announced today that he has appointed Indiana District 78 Representative Suzanne Crouch as Auditor of State for Indiana.

FEATURES
“No Justice For Ian Stark”: Rally Decries Lack of Shelter
Last week, a man named Ian Stark was found dead at the Colonial Crest Apartment complex on the north side of Bloomington. Stark was reportedly homeless and police say he might have died from exposure to the cold weather. In response, a group gathered Friday night on the Courthouse Square to bring attention to Stark’s death and to the continuing issues with lack of shelter in Bloomington. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford has that story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

ACTIVATE
Eva Marsh, the first youth volunteer for the Bloomington Pride Film Festival, discusses the upcoming festival and talks about how to get involved, on Activate! our weekly segment spotlighting people working for positive change in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Chris Martin
Today’s headlines were written by Chris Martin and Alycin Bektesh, along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford.
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker, our engineer is Chris Martin,
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Activate! – PRIDE festival: Eva Marsh

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Eva Marsh, the first youth volunteer for the Bloomington Pride Film Festival, discusses the upcoming festival and talks about how to get involved.

“No Justice For Ian Stark”: Rally Decries Lack of Shelter

Play

Last week, a man named Ian Stark was found dead at the Colonial Crest Apartment complex on the north side of Bloomington. Stark was reportedly homeless and police say he might have died from exposure to the cold weather. In response, a group gathered Friday night on the Courthouse Square to bring attention to Stark’s death and to the continuing issues with lack of shelter in Bloomington. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford has that story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

This time last year…

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WFHB’s Annual countdown of the top ten news stories of the year begins Wednesday! Here’s some nostalgia for you to ease the anticipation  – the top news story of 2012 “A Penny for Your Votes”

For a full recap of last year’s list: check out our archives!

2012 saw many Americans captivated by the most expensive presidential election in history – at the same time, political money poured into Indiana and Monroe County from around the country in efforts to affect our elections. Of course, local businesses and people also tossed their money into the pot, to help their candidates buy TV ads, campaign signs, robo-calls and the like; and thanks to a Supreme Court ruling from a couple years ago, there were fewer limits this time around on what could be given to help, or hurt, political candidates. The Daily Local News covered money in politics all year, from the race for governor, to the U.S. Congress, to local races in Monroe County.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 5

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Bloomington’s Baha’i Community

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This fall, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, issued another fatwa, or religious edict, against the Baha’i community. The Baha’is are the largest non-Muslim religious minority in Iran. Indiana University graduate student Sudeshna Chowdhury spoke to Baha’is in Bloomington, to learn about the local Baha’i community and hear its reactions to the persecution, for today’s WFHB feature courtesy of American Student Radio.

Daily Local News – December 13, 2013

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The state of Indiana has temporarily extended its Healthy Indiana Plan; The Monroe County Public Library is considering raises for some of its managers; New research from Indiana University has found that science journal citations reveal an industry bias against women;

FEATURES
Bloomington’s Baha’i Community
This fall, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, issued another fatwa, or religious edict, against the Baha’i community. The Baha’is are the largest non-Muslim religious minority in Iran. Indiana University graduate student Sudeshna Chowdhury spoke to Baha’is in Bloomington, to learn about the local Baha’i community and hear its reactions to the persecution, for today’s WFHB feature courtesy of American Student Radio.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Sudeshna Chowdhury.
Volunteer Connection was produced by Alycin Bektesh, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer is Nick Tumino,
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

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