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Hola Bloomington – March 7, 2014

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Hostess Prisma Lopez and Carlos Bakota interview Debbie Rincones form the Indiana Civil Rights Commission. The local news, sports, eco-report with Ramon Tristani and “Desde los pasillos”… with students from the Academy with Melissa Mitra and the events of the week.

Volunteer Connection – March 7, 2014

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 17

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Writer’s Showcase: Tony Brewer

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Tony Brewer is a poet, an author, and president of the Bloomington Storytellers Guild. Correspondent Michael Glab spoke with Brewer, and we’re bringing you highlights from that conversation for today’s WFHB feature report.

Daily Local News – March 6, 2014

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A bill that will increase recycling efforts in Indiana was passed on Tuesday; As Spring approaches, owners of shallow ponds and lakes will have to watch out for fish kills due to the accumulation of snow and ice this winter; The City of Bloomington Arts Commission has announced that revised guidelines and applications are available for the April Cycle of its 2014 Arts Project Grant Program; This weekend in local sports – Tonight the Indiana University Women’s Basketball team faces Michigan in the Big Ten Tournament at 6:30 pm—the tournament will continue through Sunday.

FEATURE
Tony Brewer is a poet, an author, and president of the Bloomington Storytellers Guild. Correspondent Michael Glab spoke with Brewer, and we’re bringing you highlights from that conversation for today’s WFHB feature report.

VOICES IN THE STREET
Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown. The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals. The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal yesterday, so how do you feel? Should we restrict what kinds of business can operate downtown?

CREDITS
Anchors: Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner and Jalisa Ransom,
Our feature was produced by Sarah Hetrick, with correspondent Michael Glab.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer today is Sarah Hetrick.
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

bloomingOUT – March 6, 2014

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Canadian singer/songwriter Toni Vere is live in studio for interview and performance. Musical selections are “When You Were Here,” “Free,” “Sane” and “Levi Strauss.” Cassaundra and Michael respond to Q Mail Bag question “Why is the LGBTQ community focusing on legalizing marriage when we can still be fired for simply being lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans?”

www.tonivere.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick
Guest Co Anchor Cassaundra Huskey

Voices in the Street – McBloomington: Restricting Chain Stores Downtown

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown.  The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals.  The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal yesterday, so how do you feel?  Should we restrict what kinds of business can operate downtown?

EcoReport – Ralph Keeling: Scripps Institute

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Ralph Keeling, professor at the Scripps Institute at the University of California – San Diego, discusses problems related to global carbon levels and climate.

Indiana passes bill to increase local recycling effort

A bill that will increase recycling efforts in Indiana was passed on Tuesday. Indiana State Senator Mike Stoops, who has supported House Bill 1183, talks about what spurred its creation.

“The idea is to identify recycling that is being thrown away with trash,” Stoops says, “We had a study committee that identified a significant amount of recycling in Indiana being thrown into a landfill. There was a lot of discussion about the fact that Indiana was lagging behind other states to turn that material into useful resources.”

The bill will require Indiana businesses and recycling centers to report all recycling activity to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

Recyclers of municipal waste can choose to report annually or quarterly, and non-municipal waste recyclers can be report voluntarily. This will be required starting in 2015. It establishes a goal for Indiana to reduce 50 percent of municipal waste by 2019.

“Indiana had a goal like this in the past,” Stoops says, “We didn’t take any steps to get to that goal then. A couple years ago they completely eliminated the recycling goal under Mitch Daniels.”

Senator Stoops says the specific types of products Indiana will be recycling aluminum cans, and that these are beneficial to aluminum companies as well, because they don’t need a lot of processing to recycle the aluminum, don’t need to spend money on mining aluminum ore, and that aluminum doesn’t degrade, so it is always recyclable.

Both Senator Stoops and Press Secretary of the Indiana Senate Democratic Caucus Sean Mobley believe this bill will create thousands of jobs in Indiana.

“One estimate is that if we do a better job of getting the recycling out of the waste stream, we could be looking at 10,000 jobs,” Stoops says.

This bill will go into effect along with Senate Bill 324, which bans the disposal of mostly recyclable products.

Any product that is entirely, or almost entirely, made of paper, cardboard, glass, aluminum, or plastic is not to be disposed of in a final disposal facility. Both bills will go into effect on July 1.

Shallow lake fish affected by heavy ice and snow

As Spring approaches, owners of shallow ponds and lakes will have to watch out for fish kills due to the accumulation of snow and ice this winter. The lakes and ponds of Indiana are currently covered in up to twenty inches of thick ice. Neil Ledet, District Fisheries Biologist in northeastern Indiana, says this is a result of the long winter.

“This is a pretty unusual winter for us,” Ledet says, “We had early ice, a lot of snow, and with that ice thickness, there isn’t a lot of light penetration to get to the aquatic plants. We’ll see low oxygen levels in lakes and ponds. It could be a tough situation for shallow lakes and ponds”

Shoveling up snow will allow light to penetrate the ice, but Ledet says that once this becomes an issue there’s not much anyone can do about it. He explains what pond and lake owners CAN do if the same thing happens next winter.

“In the future, lake owners could make sure there aren’t a lot of weeds covering the lake before the winter comes,” Ledet says, “The important thing is that if people lose all of their pond, they’re going to want to start over with an appropriate pond stocking program. We have a pond management booklet to help that.”

Ledet says that fish kills occurred more often during the 1970’s and 80’s, when winters were a little more severe. If Lake residents and anglers discover fish kills on public waters they can contact their district fisheries biologist online at wildlife.in.gov.

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