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Daily Local News – February 28, 2014

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The Office of Enrollment Management at Indiana University Bloomington has hired an associate director to find more effective ways to find students from underrepresented populations; The Bloomington City Council showed approval February 26th on placing historic protections on a neighborhood just east of Indiana University; The City of Bloomington Commission on the Status of Women will host a women’s leadership event called Social Justice: Women Take Action; This weekend in local sports.

FEATURE
Narrowing the Skills Gap: An Interview with Joe Donnelly
Some are saying there is a skills gap in Indiana – that there are manufacturing jobs available but not enough skilled workers to fill them. Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly about his support for the Midwestern Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute, which he hopes will train Indiana workers with the skills needed to get those jobs, and his involvement with the Skills2Compete Coalition, a bipartisan group that aims to close the skills gap in Indiana. She then spoke with Indiana University Labor Studies Professor Joe Varga about the economics behind the skills gap, all for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Alycin Bektesh
Today’s headlines were written by Daion Morton and Jalisa Ransom,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Lauren Glapa.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer and editor today is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Becktesh.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 16

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Volunteer Connection – February 28, 2014

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

bloomingOUT – February 27, 2014

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Consummate story teller Jim Doud talks about “Joe” on an edition of “Our View.” IU alum, Attorney and Cherokee Indian Becca Riall responds to a listener query “Why don’t Indians just become Americans?” by discussing the politics and government regulations as they relate to reservations in the U.S. Helen addresses the nursing career on an edition of “Queer Herstory. Featured artist is Oregon folk artist Josh Garrels and musical selections are “Flood Waters” and “Fire by Night” from his latest “The Sea InBetween” cd.

www.joshgarrels.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick

IU’s Douglas Edmonds Receives Fellowship Award for Environmental Research

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Indiana University geologist and assistant professor Douglas Edmonds has been awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship, and with it comes fifty thousand dollars to help him continue his research on river deltas. Correspondent Casey Kuhn spoke with Edmonds about his work and its impact for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Voices in the Street – Some “Assembly” Required

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Our weekly public opinion feature Voices in the Street asks how YOU feel attending a basketball game in Assembly Hall after the falling beam incident last week.

EcoReport – Johannes Wachs: Berlin International Film Festival

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In today’s EcoReport feature Johannes Wachs from the Berlin International Film Festival talks about the challenges of trying to decrease the environmental impact of a cinema event attended by half a million people every year.

New Area Code Coming to Bloomington Area

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A new ten-digit area code system will be implemented for residents in Indiana’s 812 area code region on September 6, 2014.

On March 1, residents will still be able to use the 812 area code, but should start using 10 digits when they make a call.

Spokesman for the Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor Anthony Swinger explains why a new area code change is being implemented.

“It’s important to keep in mind that 930 is just being added to the 812 area,” Swinger says, “Anyone with an 812 number right now will keep his or her number after the change. The 930 numbers are going to be added after October 6. The reason for the new area code is because the 812 area code, which has stayed unchanged since 1947, is close to running out of numbers. The industry projects that in the middle of 2015, 812 will no longer have any numbers for new phones and customers. So, it’s necessary to add the new area code so there’s a large enough pool of numbers.”

The dialing system will help usher in the new 930 area code, which will take effect in the fall.

The new area code is being added using what is called the overlay method. Swinger says this method has been used by 37 states in the U.S. for area code change-overs since 2008.

The discussion to use an overlay or a split method was a year-long case that the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission ordered in July 2013.

After the case closed, the IURC decided that the overlay method would be the least disruptive. Swinger explains how the new system will affect residents in the 812 region.

“The changes will affect everyone to one degree or another,” Swinger says, “The main way the changes will affect folks in Bloomington and south central Indiana will be the need for 10 digit dialing for local calls. Instead of just dialing 7 digits, it will be necessary to dial 812 than the seven digits. What begins Saturday is a six month period to adjust to 10 digit dialing. If the old habit comes up in this grace period, the number will still go through.”

On September 6, residents can continue to use the 812 area code but will have to use ten digits to make a call. When October 6 rolls around, residents will have to begin using the new 930 area code and continue to use ten digits to place a call.

IU Students Form ‘March Madness’ Volunteer Group to Spread Information on Obamacare

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The Indiana University and Ivy Tech students of the Affordable Care Act Volunteers of Monroe County are starting a new campus organization.

The group is launching a March healthcare campaign called “Madness” that will help students learn more about health insurance and the Affordable Care Act.

David Meyer, president of the ACA Volunteers of Monroe County, says this campaign will have campus-wide events, but want to focus on social media.

“We have a couple of students who are co-leads on the campaign,” Meyer says, “They divide up the responsibilities between social media and public events and direct outreach. Since so many students are deeply involved in social media, that’s a major way to provide them with information.  It’s still in the early stages, but we’re focused on getting this going right now because the deadline for signing up for coverage is March 31.”

Meyer says the cost of health insurance may be less expensive than the penalty students will have to pay if they do not get health insurance by March 31.

Students who are claimed as a dependent on their parents taxes will not have to pay the penalty, but their parents will.

Meyer says he hopes the campaign will help answer questions about the ACA that differ from questions that older adults may have about healthcare.

“We have a couple of students who are co-leads on the campaign,” Meyers says, “They divide up the responsibilities between social media and public events and direct outreach. Since so many students are deeply involved in social media, that’s a major way to provide them with information.  It’s still in the early stages, but we’re focused on getting this going right now because the deadline for signing up for coverage is March 31.”

The next event for the ACA Volunteers of Monroe County is the Health Insurance Community Fair. The fair is next Thursday, March 6 at the Monroe County Library from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Meyer says the event will give students and community members a chance to pair with trained volunteers that will help them answer questions they have concerning the ACA.

Aerial Photos of Bloomington Approved for Property Assessment

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The Monroe County Commission approved a $271,000 contract on February 21 with a company that plans to take aerial photographs of the entire County.

The company, Pictometry International Corporation, would fly over the area to take high-resolution pictures for the County Assessor’s office.

Assessor Judy Sharp said one way her staff uses images like these is to detect changes in properties, which can affect their assessed value and in turn their property taxes.

“This is the third time we’ve done this,” Sharp said, “We fly over every three years because Monroe County is such a fast-growing community. In three years, you have a lot of new product out there. This company can actually tell us the changes, good or bad, to a piece of property”

Sharp said the contract, which covers three years, includes a stipulation that prevents the public from accessing the photographs.

“It is strictly in the assessor’s office,” Sharp said, “The city police could use this, but it isn’t a tool just anyone use because it’s licensed. You can go online at our 39 degrees GIS website which does something very similar, but it isn’t what we use.”

The commission voted unanimously to approve the agreement.

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