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Daily Local News – May 21, 2014

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A set of proposed rules would leave exactly 47 locations in Monroe County where companies could legally build adult bookstores or strip clubs; Eleven international teachers are coming to IU’s campus this fall as part of the Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Program; More than ninety percent of water utility customers use online payments, saving the city printing and mailing fees for paper bills; Duke Energy is preparing a 90-acre site for potential development in Monroe County as part of the Site Readiness Program.

FEATURE
Today, Charlotte Zietlow, former Bloomington City Council member, Monroe County Commissioner, and current President of the Board of Public Works, speaks with WFHB correspondent Michael G. Glab about her life in public service, for today’s WFHB feature report.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE!
Scammers get in touch with you in different ways, but they’re always after the same thing: your money. Here are three classic and timely examples.

CREDITS
Anchors: Cathi Norton, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services.
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish,
Our feature was produced by Dan Withered, with correspondent Michael Glab
Our engineer today is Jim Lang,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Gay Sensibility in Historical Preservation: Will Fellows discusses his “passion to preserve”

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On May 2, 2014 Will Fellows, author of Farm Boys and A Passion to Preserve, gave a presentation to an audience at the Buskirk Chumley theater. The lecture covered the material in his most recent book, A Passion to Preserve. In the book Mr. Fellows analyzes how an affinity for historic preservation is commonly shared by gay men and straight women. He examines the specific cultural identity of gay men that leads to this seeming stereotype being true in many cases. The lecture kicked off National Preservation month and is part of the Rosemary P. Miller lecture series. The talk was recorded live on location for Standing room only, on WFHB.

Daily Local News – May 20, 2014

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The Monroe County Election Board struggled with the complexities of election law May 16th as they decided whether to invalidate some ballots cast during the May 6th primary election; A report from the National Employment Law Project found that Indiana has the largest increase of poverty-level jobs across the last 3 years.

FEATURE
Under new rules recently adopted by the Indiana State Board of Education, high schools in Indiana will now be able to hire people without formal training as a teacher or school administrator. These new rules are similar to those first proposed by Tony Bennett, former state superintendent of public education. During the last general election Bennett, a republican, lost to Democrat Glenda Ritz after he proposed similar rules that were broadly criticized for de-professionalizing teaching. The new rules were adopted in a 6 to 5 vote of the state board of education over the objections of Ritz. One of the critics of these new rules and of the Bennett proposals is Gerardo Gonzales, Dean of the IU School of Education in Bloomington. Correspondent David Murphy asked Dean Gonzales to comment on the new rules for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
You may be saving money, but are you growing it? On this installment we talk about inflation and how it can eat away at your savings if you don’t find prudent ways to keep it growing.

CREDITS
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by David Murphy
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library
Our engineer is Drew Daudelin
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

No Degree? No Problem! Indiana Lifts Degree Requirement for Educators

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Under new rules recently adopted by the Indiana State Board of Education, high schools in Indiana will now be able to hire people without formal training as a teacher or school administrator. These new rules are similar to those first proposed by Tony Bennett, former state superintendent of public education. During the last general election Bennett, a republican, lost to Democrat Glenda Ritz after he proposed similar rules that were broadly criticized for de-professionalizing teaching. The new rules were adopted in a 6 to 5 vote of the state board of education over the objections of Ritz. One of the critics of these new rules and of the Bennett proposals is Gerardo Gonzales, Dean of the IU School of Education in Bloomington. Correspondent David Murphy asked Dean Gonzales to comment on the new rules for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Ins and Outs of Money – Maintain Your Money’s Buying Power

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You may be saving money, but are you growing it? On this installment we talk about inflation and how it can eat away at your savings if you don’t find prudent ways to keep it growing.

IU Art Museum Director Retires

Adelheid ‘Heidi’ Gealt has announced her retirement as the IU Art Museum Director. Gealt has been director since 1987.

Bruce Cole, Professor Emeritus of Art History and Comparative Literature has been assigned chair of a search committee to recruit a new director.

The new successor will be responsible for upholding the mission of the IU Art Museum to advance the academic goals of IU and enrich the cultural lives of society by preserving and researching original works of art.

A committee of 10 faculty members are interviewing candidates and intend to hire a new director by July 1.

Election Board Struggle With Complex Voter Laws

The Monroe County Election Board struggled with the complexities of election law May 16 as they decided whether to invalidate some ballots cast during the May 6 primary election.

The Board met to consider provisional ballots, which voters cast when poll workers have questions about their eligibility to vote. In one case, County Clerk Linda Robbins said a homeless man voted at the wrong polling place.

William Ellis, a substitute Board member representing the Republican party, said he would like to count the vote. But Ellis said that wasn’t possible because the voter used the wrong ballot, meaning he would have voted in some of the wrong races.

“Being homeless is a hard enough hardship and the vote, if all being equal, I’d be inclined to make this valid,” Ellis says. “It’s hard to prove where you live if you aren’t living anywhere.”

Ellis participated as a Board member even though he plans to run for office in November. Ellis has said he plans to seek the Republican nomination for County Assessor during a caucus this summer.

The Board members were not allowed to look at the provisional ballots they considered. That restriction became an issue when one voter’s paperwork was sealed in an envelope along with the ballot.

The Board voted to rule that ballot invalid. The Board considered some provisional ballots that were cast by voters who did not bring IDs to the polls. Robbins, who opposes the state’s voter ID law, recommended counting one of those ballots.

She said poll workers might not have instructed the voter on how to ensure their vote would be counted after Election Day.

“I do believe the photo ID is a burden for certain individuals,” Robbins says.

Later in the meeting, Robbins said the complex rules for casting provisional ballots are often a source of confusion during elections.

“Filling out a provisional ballot at the polls has been a huge challenge for us,” Robbins says. “It’s very confusing for everybody. Frankly, I’ll commend anybody that has the patience to stay there and must really want to vote to go through that process.”

The Board voted to invalidate two provisional ballots cast at retirement homes. The voters had been registered to vote at previous residences.

Interchange – Ernest Lockridge: The Nostalgia of Emptiness in Raintree County

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Photo Credit: Hugh Hazelrigg

Host Doug Storm ends our three-part series on Bloomington author Ross Lockridge, Jr. and his bestselling novel of 1948 with an interview with Ernest Lockridge, the oldest child of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

In the program Ernest Lockridge discusses his answers to the mystery of his father’s suicide elaborated in his book Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father Ross Lockridge, Jr. laying emphasis on what he calls “the culture of pedophilia” of the 1940s Bloomington made prominent by Alfred Kinsey.

Ernest’s brother, Larry Lockridge, strongly opposes this view and offers what he calls a “refutation” to Ernest’s allegations against their grandfather: “Larry Lockridge’s Response to Ernest Lockridge.”

Both brothers have prepared statements as coda to this series of radio programs which offer a kind of “last word” on the subject. Those statements made via email to Interchange Producer Doug Storm follow directly below.

More about Ernest Lockridge, his Skeleton Key to the Suicide, his novels, memoirs, and paintings can be found online here: Paintings of Ernest Lockridge.

The two previous shows in the series:

Interchange – Taking the Measure of Raintree County

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: In the Shade of the Raintree

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Larry Lockridge’s refutation of the allegations made by Ernest Lockridge in his book Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father, Ross Lockridge, Jr.

“It wasn’t the lack of evidence, it was the considerable counter-evidence I accumulated during my research for my biography of Ross Lockridge, Jr., Shade of the Raintree, that led me totally to reject my brother Ernest’s theory that childhood sexual abuse of Ross Junior by Ross Senior was the “skeleton key” to the tragedy. I have posted this counter-evidence, some eighteen items, on my brother Ross III’s website, www.raintreecounty.com under “The Biography.” The single piece of counter-evidence people find most convincing concerns an arrangement Ross Junior made with Ross Senior in January of 1947. Ernest was then eight years old and not taking well to the cold weather in Manistee, Michigan where our family was staying. Ross Junior arranged for Ernest to live in Bloomington at his father’s house for four months. The idea was that he would enroll in third grade at Elm Heights elementary school and Ross Senior would teach him recitation. Elsie Lockridge and occasionally Lillian Lockridge would also be in residence, but Ernest and his grandfather would be unsupervised in the large house. If Ross Junior knew that his father had sexually abused himself as a child, would he have put Ernest in such terrible jeopardy? The answer is so emphatically no that this single item is in itself sufficient to discredit Ernest’s entire theory; his key simply doesn’t fit. (With respect to his health, other arrangements could have been made: Ernest could have stayed, as Larry subsequently did, with his mother’s relatives, the Mumbys, within easier walking distance of Elm Heights.)

“I cannot disprove Ernest’s memories of fondling by his grandfather during sleepovers after the suicide of Ross Junior. None of the rest of us encountered such behavior in this grandfather we loved and respected, so these memories are truly shocking. Assuming some truth in them, I suspect Ross Senior’s behavior was yet another bitter consequence of the suicide itself, some totally inappropriate attempt at bonding with the surviving elder grandson by a depressed and guilty person—as parents of suicides usually are. This is an explanation, not an exculpation. It is also a possibility Ernest nowhere considers. It could explain the lack of continuity between Ross Senior’s behavior before the suicide, where I have proved beyond any doubt that there was no sexual abuse, and Ross Senior’s behavior after the suicide as Ernest has described it. Again, the “skeleton key’ Ernest insists on to explaining our father’s suicide doesn’t fit, whatever his own subsequent victimization.”

Larry Lockridge, May 14, 2014, via email to Doug Storm

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Ernest Lockridge Responds:

“Larry posits that grief might have caused a decent man, a Doctor Jekyll, to become a sexual monster, a Mister Hyde, and that this might explain Grandpa’s attack on me on the heels of my father’s suicide. By this logic, Bruce’s drowning years earlier might just as well have caused Grandpa to molest Shockley.

“There was no grief or love propelling the indignant, imperious Mister Hyde who attacked me violently. A predator who had invested so much precious time and energy prepping me was claiming his just reward.

“My sainted father would never have abandoned me to a deviant? Last time I looked this is the same father who abandoned his entire family, the lot of us, wife and four kids, without even acknowledging our existence.

“Embedded in SKELETON KEY TO THE SUICIDE OF MY FATHER is the covert culture of pervasive pedophilia, incest, and childhood sexual abuse, cocooned by institutional protection and denial, and permitted to persist, and to wreak unacknowledged havoc in the lives of innocents. Only now are we recognizing the role of denial and naiveté in perpetuating this plague on humanity. We are also just beginning to acknowledge and understand the leading role incestuous pedophilia plays in the tragedy of suicide.

“Larry’s “counter-evidence” counters nothing; rather, it unwittingly re-inscribes the menu of lethal canards that nourish the pedophile. My brother’s entire argument, the rotting foundation of “the biography,” is an epiphany of denial, a tedious mishmash of naiveté and questionable recall that fails to acknowledge the fiendish wiliness and persistence of the pedophile, and how families close ranks to appease and protect him even as he gluts himself at the family trough. “Grandpa would never have done a thing like that”; “Grandma would never have stood for it”; “but he never did anything to me”; “he’s too old, feeble, harmless” (whereas, pedophiles become “harmless” only after the coffin-lid is nailed down); “it’s a one-off thing”; “‘what we had together’ was unique, my being so special and all.”

“Even Custodians of the Family Honor have a minimal responsibility to bring themselves up to date. Rejecting SKELETON KEY rejects what at long last is becoming factually and irrefutably known regarding the domestic pedophile, his victim, and the deplorable propensity of other family-members to do literally anything to make it all just disappear.

Ernest Lockridge, May 15, 2014, via email to Doug Storm

Bring It On! – May 19, 2014

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Bev Smith and William Hosea welcome Gerrick DeVane, owner and proprietor of Gerrick’s BBQ Catering Company.

PART ONE
Gerrick DeVane, owner and proprietor of Gerrick’s BBQ Catering Company, joins Bev and William on the show to acquaint the listening audience with his new establishment on the corner of 17th and Dunn.

With over 5 years of experience, Gerrick’s specializes in catering graduation events, sports events, birthday parties and cookouts.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Daily Local News – May 19th, 2014

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There will be a protest at the Chipotle Restaurant on Kirkwood Avenue Saturday, May 24th; The Monroe County Commission accepted a $119,000 state grant May 16th to pay for a program aimed at protecting endangered adults; Hoosiers are being reminded to ‘click it or ticket.’ Bloomington Police Department is increasing efforts to enforce proper seatbelts and restraints with Memorial Day approaching; A scientist, an artist and a musician from Indiana University have created a short film about human communication throughout history.

FEATURE
Last week Governor Mike Pence unveiled his plan for covering the 350,000 Hoosiers who have been ineligible for both Affordable Care Act coverage and the Healthy Indiana Plan during the past year as Pence has resisted adopting the ACA and accepting federal funding to provide health insurance to those in need. The Daily Local news ran reports from affordable insurance advocates last week, and today, brings you the Governors take on accessible health insurance, for today’s Daily Local news feature report.

ACTIVATE!
Sandy Myers, volunteer coordinator for the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and Don Westerhouse, a ReStore volunteer, discuss the ReStore’s mission and put out the call for the community to Fill the Gap by volunteering with them this summer.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Dan Withered
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker,
Our engineer is Chris Martin,
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

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