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bloomingOUT – March 19, 2014

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Join co-host Ryne Shadday as he interviews co-host Erica Dorsey and producer Olivia Davidson about their backgrounds and involvement with the show. We also hear another episode of the weekly segment “Out on Campus” along with calendar events and news.

Hosts – Ryne Shadday and Erica Dorsey
Executive Producer – Joe Crawford
Producer – Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator – Hayley Bass
Board Engineer – Carissa Barrett

EcoReport – Jim Nelson: The Choral Reefs of Florida and the Caribbean, Part 2

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In today’s EcoReport, we bring you part two of an interview with Jim Nelson, in which he discusses the condition of coral reefs in Florida and the Caribbean.

EcoReport – March 19, 2015

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In today’s EcoReport, we bring you part two of an interview with Jim Nelson, in which he discusses the condition of coral reefs in Florida and the Caribbean.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Today’s Anchors: David Lyman and Julianna Dailey
This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene, Norm Holy and Halle Shine. Our feature and broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. This week’s calendar was compiled by Catherine Anders.
EcoReport is produced by Dan Young, Filiz Cicek, Nancy Jones and Gillian Wilson. Executive producer is Joe Crawford.

Spring Peepers

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Standing Room Only – Native American Church

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On February 27th, the Mathers Museum of World Culture hosted Daniel Swan, Curator of Ethnology at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History at University of Oklahoma, to speak of the musical instruments used in Native American Church. Swan says that the musical instruments used in Peyotism provide an important opportunity to consider the role of material culture and music in the construction of religious identities in contemporary Native American communities.

Interchange – Forbearance and Fighting: Parsing Jihad and Martyrdom

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Asma Afsaruddin to discuss her book Striving in the Path of God: Jihad and Martyrdom in Islamic Thought.

In her essay “Inventing ‘Jihad‘,” Afsaruddin writes:

Privileging the legal literature above other kinds of literature—particularly the exegetical literature on the Qur’an and ethical treatises—in discussions of jihad almost inevitably leads to the conclusion that it is primarily a collective military obligation incumbent upon able-bodied Muslim men in the service of state and religion. And because what we call Islamic law is assumed to be derived directly from the Qur’an and the hadith (the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad), such an obligation is assumed to be mandated by Islam itself.

But if we put on our historical glasses a considerably different picture emerges. The earliest connotations of jihad had to do with patient forbearance in the face of harm and stoic, nonviolent resistance to wrongdoing….

Some were also of the opinion that the Qur’anic command to fight was only applicable to the first generation of Muslims who were contemporaries of Muhammad, known as the Companions, since the historical referent in the verses that deal with fighting are the hostile pagan Arabs of Mecca.

Such understandings, however, could and did prove inimical to the process of empire-building, and the need was soon felt in official and certain legal circles to promote the military jihad as a religiously meritorious activity. This is precisely what happened during the expansion of the Islamic empire after the death of Muhammad during the late seventh and eighth centuries of the Common Era….

This progressive watering-down in later exegetical and legal literature of the categorical Qur’anic prohibition against initiating hostilities is revealing of the triumph of political realism over scriptural fidelity.

Some scholars from the later period continued to dispute this cooptation of jihad in the service of Realpolitik. These scholars’ main area of contention was with the legal position which came to view lack of adherence to Islam, rather than aggression on the part of the adversary, as the casus belli for the military jihad, a position they regarded as unethical and morally impermissible.

Of Related Interest:
How Do We Talk About Islam After Charlie Hebdo?
Egypt and the Problem of Religion
Islam and Modernity: Issues for the Classroom (Podcast)

Guest:
Asma Afsaruddin is professor of Islamic Studies and chair of the Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures at Indiana University, Bloomington. She was named a Carnegie Scholar in 2005. Her previous books include The First Muslims: History and Memory (2008), and Excellence and Precedence: Medieval Islamic Discourse on Legitimate Leadership (2002) She was awarded the World Book Prize for the best new book in Islamic Studies given by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance of the Republic of Iran on February 8th in Tehran, Iran’s capital and largest city.

Credits:
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Bring It On! – March 16, 2015

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William Hosea and Beverly Calender-Anderson welcome Gary, IN Mayor Karen Freeman- Wilson.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, William and Beverly welcome Gary, IN Mayor Karen Freeman- Wilson. She join us, by phone, reflect on the successes of her first term in office and the progress made towards implementing a path for Gary’s prosperity and opportunity and a look ahead to her bid for a reelection.

She also comments on two recent announcements; the first, as an appointee to the 2016 Presidential Election Task Force and, the second, as a Presidential appointee to a federal task force on 21st Century Policing.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea and Beverly Calender-Anderson
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Books Unbound – “Lost Borders” by Mary Hunter Austin, Part 1

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Mary Hunter Austin was born in Illinois in 1868 and died in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 1934. Her father encouraged her interest in writing, but died when she was only ten. Her mother considered fiction mere “storying” akin to lying, and found Mary too insistent about shaping her identity as an individual. Mary did attend college, and earned a degree in math and science—not typical of women at the time. But her physical and emotional health deteriorated, and the family moved to California partly in the hope that the climate would strengthen her. In the West she found a husband, who proved to be unenduring, and her true calling as a writer. She was inspired by the desert landscape of the Mojave, and by the spiritual and storytelling traditions of Native peoples.

Austin was a prolific writer publishing thirty-one books, and belonged to a creative community that included Jack London, Willa Cather, and Ansel Adams. Soon after her death, however, her work fell out of print, and she has been largely forgotten and omitted from the literary canon.

The interconnected story cycle of Lost Borders challenges myths of the West as a setting for masculine self-definition from an ironic feminist perspective. Her own myth-making sometimes leads her into essentialism—variously interpreted by critics as either challenging or merely perpetuating stereotypes. Her depictions of Shoshone and Paiute women are sympathetic, but raise similar questions.

Sarah Torbeck represents the voice of the author throughout, and reads the story “The Land.” Other voices of “Borderers,” as Austin called them, are represented by Renee Reed (“The Hoodoo of the Minnietta”), Shayne Laughter (“A Case of Conscience”), and Berklea Going (“The Ploughed Land,” and poem). Doug Storm hosts, and Jack Hanek is announcer.

Special music for the episode comes from “The Light Guitar” by Patrick Zimmerli, performed by violinist Tim Fain on his album River of Light (Naxos, 2011).

This episode is produced, written and edited by Cynthia Wolfe with assistance from Sarah Torbeck, Robert Shull, and Doug Storm.

Executive producer: Joe Crawford
Books Unbound theme music: The Impossible Shapes

Hola Bloomington – March 13, 2015

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Los locutores de HOLA Bloomington Maria Auxiliadora Viloria y Mónica Hernández platican con Lillian Casillas, Dayanna Arichavala, Jonathan Barrienros y Mintzi Martínez-Rivera. Ellas discuten la importancia de celebrar el mes de la historia de la mujer y los avances en nuestra sociedad con respecto a la igualdad de derechos para la mujer.

Hola Bloomington hosts Maria Auxiliadora Viloria and Monica Hernandez interview Lillian Casillas, Dayanna Arichavala, Jonathan Barrienros and Mintzi Martinez-Rivera. They discuss the importance of celebrating Women’s History Month and progress in our society with regards to equal rights for women.

bloomingOUT – March 12, 2015

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Hosts Erica Dorsey, Ryne Shadday, and Jeff Poling interview our guest JJ Gufreda, an author and playwright, about her book, Left Hander in London, as well as her background being a transgender woman.  We also hear some of JJ’s original music. This song is her latest. This is her response to the recent transgender bathroom and religious freedom laws. When You Gotta Go You Gotta Go she says might be a little tongue in cheek but it raises some good points to counteract the bigotry and fear exhibited by people introducing and supporting these bills.  This is JJ Gufreda “When you gotta go you gotta go”. Our weekly segment Out on Campus, the second part of Arielle’s conversation with Frankie about his time at the Midwestern Bi Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference. This week, the two talk about identity formation and development, learning about other identities, and how the conference played into the relationship between the two. Our staff would like to thank our guest JJ Gufreda for being with us tonight.

Credits

Hosts Erica Dorsey, Ryne Shadday, and Jeff Poling

Executive Producer Joe Crawford

Producer Olivia Davidson

Script Coordinator Hayley Bass

Board Engineer Carissa Barrett

 

 

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