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Human Remains found in Mobile Home Park

From the City of Bloomington Police Department:

This Morning the Bloomington Police Department responded to a call of possible human remains being found on a vacant lot at Arlington Valley Mobile Home Park located at 1600 North Willis Drive. Property managers made the discovery while cleaning up the lot that had been vacant since a mobile home was moved from it sometime this summer.

It appeared that a plastic storage bin had been placed over the remains which was located at the rear of the vacant lot. Upon arrival, officers and detectives confirmed the remains were human and found them to be in an advanced stage of decomposition. Initial estimates indicate the remains may be two to three months old. No indication of age, race or gender was able to be made.

The Bloomington Police Department is working with the Monroe County Coroner’s Office who also had representatives at the scene. The remains have been transported to the University of Indianapolis where personnel from the Anthropology Department will assist with identification and a possible cause of death. According to the Coroner, results may not be available for four (4) to six (6) weeks.

The death investigation is ongoing and additional details will be released as it becomes available.

Interchange – Brave New GMOs

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Tonight’s guest is long-time critic of genetically modified organisms and foods, Marti Crouch, a noted academic research scientist in plant molecular biology who turned her back on that career due to concerns about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture.

With and a new wave of genetically engineered crops (GMOs) about to be commercialized, the battle for hearts and minds is heating up. Are GMOs required to feed the burgeoning population and to save the planet, as the biotech industry claims, or are GMOs a toxic hindrance to true food security and environmental sustainability, as critics contend? Join our guest, long-time GMO critic Marti Crouch, as we explore the implications of Dow Chemical’s new corn and soybeans engineered to withstand the WWII-era weedkiller 2,4-D – approved by federal regulators just a few weeks ago; Monsanto’s new herbicide-resistant cotton and soybean, Arctic apples that don’t turn brown, eucalyptus trees that withstand freezing, golden rice designed to alleviate vitamin A deficiencies, and other brave new crops on our horizon.

Ralph Waldo Emerson writes in his great 1842 Essay Experience that “Nature hates calculators; her methods are saltatory and impulsive.”

Marti Crouch has written that “Genes have an ecology – a complex way of interacting with themselves and the environment – that can interfere with the linear logic of genetic engineering.”

Nature leaps and dances upon (and over and under and to the side of) the linear…

Guest Bio:

Martha Crouch, Ph.D., Science Consultant

Marti was a graduate student at Yale University studying the development of seeds and flowers when genes were first cloned in the 1970s.  By the time she headed her own plant molecular biology lab at Indiana University in the 1980s, plant genes were being patented. Prof. Crouch became concerned about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture and her own contributions, and as a result shut down her research lab in the 1990s and taught courses on the intersections of technology, food and agriculture, with an emphasis on environmental impacts. In 2001, Marti left Indiana University, and now pursues independent scholarship and consulting.  Her background thus spans the whole history of genetic engineering in agriculture, as both a participant and a critic, giving Marti a valuable set of skills and perspectives for her work on impacts of recent technologies for non-profits such as the Center for Food Safety.  Marti is also the official wild mushroom inspector at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Ins and Outs of Money – What Smart Spenders Know

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How can two people have about the same income, yet enjoy a different quality of life? It might have to do with spending. Smart spenders know where their money comes from and where it’s going–giving them more control over their finances and their life.

President McRobbie Details New Plans For Indiana University

Indiana University President Michael McRobbie unveiled a five year plan last week.

McRobbie’s State of the University address was devoted to what he labelled his Bicentennial Strategic Plan, which is to be implemented during the lead up to IU’s two hundredth year anniversary in 2020. The Bloomington campus should see more construction and renovation as well as the introduction of new schools and strategic changes to older schools. Most of the capital investment is to be focused on renovation of buildings around the Old Crescent, to the immediate east of Sample Gates. The plan also calls for renovating the old Wells Quad buildings to return them to their original residential function.

As for academics, McRobbie wants to put more emphasis on what he calls ‘Building and Making’, which means developing products that can be commercialized to the university and economy’s benefit. He wants to see the campus create engineering programs in art and design, and in information technology. Work on consolidating old programs into the new umbrella media school and fleshing out the new schools of public health, and global and international studies will continue.

A significant decline in enrollment at the school of education, coinciding with on-going changes in the state’s treatment of the teaching profession, and the imminent departure of the school’s long-serving Dean González, prompted the President to announce that he would establish a Blue Ribbon Panel of external experts, charged with not only making recommendations on a new dean, but undertaking a comprehensive evaluation of the school’s entire operation and making recommendations for its future.

The cultural life of people connected with the university as well as the larger community was the focus of the plan’s section on supporting creativity and cultural enrichment which noted the multi-million dollar investment over the last decade on teaching and presentation of music, theater, visual art, film, and other forms of art and entertainment.

Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative Holds Annual Meeting

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Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative held its annual meeting of the membership last week. The General Manager and Board president both addressed the crowd of more than 300 attendees, focusing their summaries on the recent efforts of Bloomingfoods workers to join a union. There were also break out discussions focused on the unionization efforts, management/employee relations, and board communications. WFHB correspondent David Murphy attended the meeting, and spoke with Bloomingfoods President Tim Clougher. Their discussion, here, in today’s community report.

Daily Local News – October 21, 2014

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Indiana University President Michael McRobbie unveiled a five year plan last week; The Indiana State Board of Education delayed the release of the Department of Education’s A-to-F School Accountability grades until November 5th; IU alumnus and Hollywood producer Michael Uslan is joining the new Indiana University Media School as a Professor of Practice in film; In 2013, Yorktown, Indiana passed an ordinance imposing time restrictions on door-to- door canvassing and solicitation “after the hour of 9:00 p.m. or sunset, whichever is earlier.”

FEATURE
Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative held its annual meeting of the membership last week. The General Manager and Board president both addressed the crowd of more than 300 attendees, focusing their summaries on the recent efforts of Bloomingfoods workers to join a union. There were also break out discussions focused on the unionization efforts, management/employee relations, and board communications. WFHB correspondent David Murphy attended the meeting, and spoke with Bloomingfoods President Tim Clougher. Their discussion, here, in today’s community report.

CREDITS
Anchors: Casey Kuhn, Chris Martin
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy, Cathi Norton, and Anson Shupe
Our feature was produced by David Murphy and Alycin Bektesh
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Ryan Stacey, in partnership with the
Monroe County Public
Our engineers are Anna Legge and Carissa Barrett
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Managing Producer is Joe Crawford
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Hollywood Producer To Teach At IU’s New Media School

Indiana University alumnus and Hollywood producer Michael Uslan is joining the new Indiana University Media School as a Professor of Practice in film.

Uslan has three decades of experience in motion picture, television, and internet work. His work includes executive producer of 1989’s “Batman” movie, later sequels including the academy award-winning “The Dark Knight,” and “National Treasure.” He is also the author of a fundamental textbook on comics and 25 other books on the history of comics and other topics.

Uslan earned a bachelors degree in history, a masters degree in education, and a Doctor of Jurisprudence, all from Indiana University.

While teaching at IU, Uslan will continue his off-campus work in motion pictures, television, and interactive and international media. In a press release, Uslan praised IU’s new Media School program calling it a premiere location between New York and Hollywood for students to prepare for careers in the film industry.

The newly appointed Uslan will speak about his transition from IU graduate to Hollywood producer at 7 p.m on Wednesday, October 22 at the Whittenberger Auditorium in the Indiana Memorial Union.

Books Unbound – “The Burning Secret” by Stefan Zweig, Part 1

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Stefan Zweig was an Austrian Jew whose books were among the first burned by the Nazis in 1933. He was one of the most beloved writers of the 1920s and 30s, but he committed suicide in Brazil in 1942, despairing that the Old Europe he loved was lost. His novella “The Burning Secret” shows the psychoanalytic influence of his friend Sigmund Freud. Zweig has enjoyed a recent renaissance in the English-speaking world, and was the inspiration for filmmaker Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel.

State Board of Education Delays Release Of Indiana School’s A-F Grades

The Indiana State Board of Education delayed the release of the Department of Education’s A-to-F School Accountability grades until November 5.

Representatives of public, private and charter schools feel criteria for the grades are unfair and addressed their concerns to the board at their meeting October 15th. According to the DOE’s website, Indiana’s school grading system provides communities with a clear and concise assessment of how their schools are performing. State law requires the state to intervene in a school that receives an “F” for six consecutive years.

Though the grades are not yet official, the Herald Times reported that Bloomington’s Fairview School will likely receive its third “F” this year. Accountability findings are based on eight data points established to measure each school’s final grade.

In previous board meetings, the SBOE established criteria for an appeals process and amidst protests from “atypically configured” schools, or schools that don’t fall within the language of the accountability rule, the SBOE voted to assess atypical schools on a case-by-case basis rather than force a formulaic approach.

Board member Dr. Brad Oliver, Sixth District representative, noted that it was important to focus on what he referred to as “substantive due process” and to apply a common sense approach to grading schools.

“If these letter grades don’t communicate something reasonable based on the data, what good are they anyway?” Oliver says.

Several schools protested DOE findings, claiming final letter grades were based on only two of the eight possible data points gathered, thus judging the school on only a fourth of their population. SBOE board member Sarah O’Brien, Fourth District Representative, wants the grading system to have integrity.

“When we release all of these grades across the state, I want them to mean something. Looking at the data before us, I’m going to make sure I do whatever I can within statute and rule to make sure that the letter grades match what we’re seeing in those buildings,” O’Brien says.

Bloomingfoods employees and co-op members rally during annual meeting in support of unionization

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WFHB Correspondent David Murphy attended Bloomingfood’s annual meeting last week and an accompanying rally by those who support a recent effort by workers to form a union. Today we hear comments from the rally for our Daily Local News community report.

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