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EcoReport – May 22, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Sandy Shapshay and Anne Sterling from BANIDS,  the Bloomington Association for Nonviolent and Innovative Deer Stewardship, discuss the Bloomington Parks Department proposal to hire sharpshooters to kill deer in Griffy Nature Preserve.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Anchors: Dan Young and Stephanie Stewart
This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene, Norm Holy, and  Stephanie Stewart. This week’s feature was engineered by Dan Young. This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee.
Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller,  Stephanie Stewart, and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Bloomington Beware! – Making Contact

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Scammers get in touch with you in different ways, but they’re always after the same thing: your money. Here are three classic and timely examples.

The Public Service of Charlotte Zietlow

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Today, Charlotte Zietlow, former Bloomington City Council member, Monroe County Commissioner, and current President of the Board of Public Works, speaks with WFHB correspondent Michael G. Glab about her life in public service, for today’s WFHB feature report.

Daily Local News – May 21, 2014

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A set of proposed rules would leave exactly 47 locations in Monroe County where companies could legally build adult bookstores or strip clubs; Eleven international teachers are coming to IU’s campus this fall as part of the Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Program; More than ninety percent of water utility customers use online payments, saving the city printing and mailing fees for paper bills; Duke Energy is preparing a 90-acre site for potential development in Monroe County as part of the Site Readiness Program.

FEATURE
Today, Charlotte Zietlow, former Bloomington City Council member, Monroe County Commissioner, and current President of the Board of Public Works, speaks with WFHB correspondent Michael G. Glab about her life in public service, for today’s WFHB feature report.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE!
Scammers get in touch with you in different ways, but they’re always after the same thing: your money. Here are three classic and timely examples.

CREDITS
Anchors: Cathi Norton, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services.
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish,
Our feature was produced by Dan Withered, with correspondent Michael Glab
Our engineer today is Jim Lang,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Gay Sensibility in Historical Preservation: Will Fellows discusses his “passion to preserve”

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On May 2, 2014 Will Fellows, author of Farm Boys and A Passion to Preserve, gave a presentation to an audience at the Buskirk Chumley theater. The lecture covered the material in his most recent book, A Passion to Preserve. In the book Mr. Fellows analyzes how an affinity for historic preservation is commonly shared by gay men and straight women. He examines the specific cultural identity of gay men that leads to this seeming stereotype being true in many cases. The lecture kicked off National Preservation month and is part of the Rosemary P. Miller lecture series. The talk was recorded live on location for Standing room only, on WFHB.

Daily Local News – May 20, 2014

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The Monroe County Election Board struggled with the complexities of election law May 16th as they decided whether to invalidate some ballots cast during the May 6th primary election; A report from the National Employment Law Project found that Indiana has the largest increase of poverty-level jobs across the last 3 years.

FEATURE
Under new rules recently adopted by the Indiana State Board of Education, high schools in Indiana will now be able to hire people without formal training as a teacher or school administrator. These new rules are similar to those first proposed by Tony Bennett, former state superintendent of public education. During the last general election Bennett, a republican, lost to Democrat Glenda Ritz after he proposed similar rules that were broadly criticized for de-professionalizing teaching. The new rules were adopted in a 6 to 5 vote of the state board of education over the objections of Ritz. One of the critics of these new rules and of the Bennett proposals is Gerardo Gonzales, Dean of the IU School of Education in Bloomington. Correspondent David Murphy asked Dean Gonzales to comment on the new rules for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
You may be saving money, but are you growing it? On this installment we talk about inflation and how it can eat away at your savings if you don’t find prudent ways to keep it growing.

CREDITS
Today’s headlines were written by Sierra Gardner
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by David Murphy
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library
Our engineer is Drew Daudelin
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

No Degree? No Problem! Indiana Lifts Degree Requirement for Educators

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Under new rules recently adopted by the Indiana State Board of Education, high schools in Indiana will now be able to hire people without formal training as a teacher or school administrator. These new rules are similar to those first proposed by Tony Bennett, former state superintendent of public education. During the last general election Bennett, a republican, lost to Democrat Glenda Ritz after he proposed similar rules that were broadly criticized for de-professionalizing teaching. The new rules were adopted in a 6 to 5 vote of the state board of education over the objections of Ritz. One of the critics of these new rules and of the Bennett proposals is Gerardo Gonzales, Dean of the IU School of Education in Bloomington. Correspondent David Murphy asked Dean Gonzales to comment on the new rules for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Ins and Outs of Money – Maintain Your Money’s Buying Power

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You may be saving money, but are you growing it? On this installment we talk about inflation and how it can eat away at your savings if you don’t find prudent ways to keep it growing.

IU Art Museum Director Retires

Adelheid ‘Heidi’ Gealt has announced her retirement as the IU Art Museum Director. Gealt has been director since 1987.

Bruce Cole, Professor Emeritus of Art History and Comparative Literature has been assigned chair of a search committee to recruit a new director.

The new successor will be responsible for upholding the mission of the IU Art Museum to advance the academic goals of IU and enrich the cultural lives of society by preserving and researching original works of art.

A committee of 10 faculty members are interviewing candidates and intend to hire a new director by July 1.

Election Board Struggle With Complex Voter Laws

The Monroe County Election Board struggled with the complexities of election law May 16 as they decided whether to invalidate some ballots cast during the May 6 primary election.

The Board met to consider provisional ballots, which voters cast when poll workers have questions about their eligibility to vote. In one case, County Clerk Linda Robbins said a homeless man voted at the wrong polling place.

William Ellis, a substitute Board member representing the Republican party, said he would like to count the vote. But Ellis said that wasn’t possible because the voter used the wrong ballot, meaning he would have voted in some of the wrong races.

“Being homeless is a hard enough hardship and the vote, if all being equal, I’d be inclined to make this valid,” Ellis says. “It’s hard to prove where you live if you aren’t living anywhere.”

Ellis participated as a Board member even though he plans to run for office in November. Ellis has said he plans to seek the Republican nomination for County Assessor during a caucus this summer.

The Board members were not allowed to look at the provisional ballots they considered. That restriction became an issue when one voter’s paperwork was sealed in an envelope along with the ballot.

The Board voted to rule that ballot invalid. The Board considered some provisional ballots that were cast by voters who did not bring IDs to the polls. Robbins, who opposes the state’s voter ID law, recommended counting one of those ballots.

She said poll workers might not have instructed the voter on how to ensure their vote would be counted after Election Day.

“I do believe the photo ID is a burden for certain individuals,” Robbins says.

Later in the meeting, Robbins said the complex rules for casting provisional ballots are often a source of confusion during elections.

“Filling out a provisional ballot at the polls has been a huge challenge for us,” Robbins says. “It’s very confusing for everybody. Frankly, I’ll commend anybody that has the patience to stay there and must really want to vote to go through that process.”

The Board voted to invalidate two provisional ballots cast at retirement homes. The voters had been registered to vote at previous residences.

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