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Daily Local News – May 20, 2015

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An Indiana University Sociology professor has just released a study contradicting previous claims that lesbians and gay men make bad parents; Last week, Purdue University announced it would freeze tuition for a fourth year in a row; The city of Bloomington Utilities Department is looking for ways to make water bills more informative and simpler for customers to understand; The Bryan Park and Mills Pools in Bloomington open this Saturday.

FEATURE
In the third installment of WFHB’s Cast of Characters series, Amanda Marino sits down with local landscape painter Troy Kilgore.

CREDITS
Anchors: Araceli Gomez, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by Jack Hanek, Ivy Bridges and Kara Tullman
Along with David Murphy for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services
Better Beware was produced by Richard Fish
Cast of Characters was produced by Amanda Marino
Our engineers today are Adam Reichle and Brian Lloyd
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford

Purdue and IU freeze tuition

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Last week, Purdue University announced it would freeze tuition for a fourth year in a row. And today, IU indicated it would follow suit. IU president Michael McRobbie recommended in a statement today that IU not increase tuition for in-state students for the next two years. The IU Board of Trustees will make a final decision on that request June third. McRobbie’s recommendation comes on the heels of Purdue Trustees approving a fourth year of a tuition freeze at that school. Purdue has frozen the rate of tuition since the 2012-2013 school year and plans on offering the same rate through the 2015-2016 academic year.

A tuition freeze would be something of a change to IU’s past approach. IU Spokesman Mark Land said yesterday that while IU has not offered an across-the-board tuition freeze recently, it has set a fixed rate for some students. There isn’t a huge difference between the two universities’ tuition for in-state students. Full-time Purdue students can expect a rate of $10,002 per year, while IU students can expect to pay $10,388 a year. At Purdue out-of-state students pay $28,804, while IU is more costly at $33,240 a year. Land says in the past IU has offered other strategies to help its students with affordability.

At Purdue, the recent tuition freeze also came with a proposed 3.5 percent merit pay increase for employees at its West Lafayette campus. Purdue Trustees also approved an increase in entry-level wages to $10 per hour for all full-time clerical and service staff. The minimum wage at IU is lower, at just $8.25 per hour. Purdue, however, pays its part-time employees, many of them students, as little as $7.25 an hour. Land says there has been talk of future wage increases at IU.

IU trustees will take public comment on tuition recommendations at their meeting Wednesday, June 3rd. Public comments begins at 3:30 p.m. in Room 450A of the IUPUI Campus Center in Indianapolis.

IU Sociology Professor releases study contradicting previous claims

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An Indiana University Sociology professor has just released a study contradicting previous claims that lesbians and gay men make bad parents. Professor Brian Powell partnered with the sociology department at the University of Connecticut to reanalyze the claims that children of same-sex parents have negative social, emotional and relational outcomes. The original study is known as the Regnerous Papers. It was conducted at the University of Texas in 2012. And, according to Powell, that study misrepresented its subjects and skewed results to favor heterosexual parents.

Professor Mark Regnerous of Texas University performed the original study. Powell says Regnerous has since used his findings to influence the legal system. While the original study has been used to try to hinder same-sex couples from becoming parents, Professor Powell says the study’s negative findings against same-sex parents has no footing. Powell says that the original study relied on responses from subjects that were inconsistent and illogical.

One respondent was a man who claimed his father’s gay lover was seven feet 8 inches tall, weighed 88 pounds, was married eight times and had eight children. Another claimed to have been arrested as an infant. Other respondents said they never lived with their same-sex parents or only lived with them for a very short time. Powell says responses like those should have never been included in study.

Interchange – The State of Terror: Guantanamo Diary

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“The State of Terror: Guantanamo Diary”

Part One: “Presenting Redacted”
Joan Hawkins and Tony Brewer discuss selections of Guantánamo Diary they chose to perform as part of a collaboration between WFHB’s Books Unbound and The Writer’s Guild at Bloomington. We talk about the force of the redactions made in the text; if the narrative is effective as an “abolitionist” document; Tony reads selections from the book.

Part Two: “Dear Reader”
Scott Korb discusses Guantánamo Diary in relation to the 19th century American slave narrative.

Guests
Joan Hawkins is an Associate Professor in the Dept of Communication and Culture at Indiana University, soon to be part of the new Media School. She’s also a member of the Progressive Faculty Coalition and an active member of the Writer’s Guild at Bloomington—her academic writing focuses on horror and the avant-garde. Her creative writing centers around memoir.

Tony Brewer is chair of the Writers Guild at Bloomington and executive director of the Spoken Word Stage at the 4th Street Arts Festival. He is a poet, spoken word performer, screenwriter, and live sound effects artist, as well as a book compositor at Indiana University Press and a regular reader on WFHB’s Books Unbound.

Scott Korb teaches writing at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study and the Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts which is part of the New School. Korb’s book Light Without Fire (2013), an intimate portrait of the first year at America’s first Muslim college, will be released in paperback on July 14th. He is also associate editor of The Harriet Jacobs Family Papers (2008), which was awarded the American Historical Association’s 2009 J. Franklin Jameson Prize.

Korb’s articles on Guantanamo Diary
“Guantánamo Diary and the American Slave Narrative”
“Forced Feeding: The Torture of Keeping Detainees Alive”

Music
“Bodies” by Drowning Pool
“The Taliban Song” by Toby Keith

Credits
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Adam Reichle
Special thanks to Books Unbound Producer Cynthia Wolfe for providing a selection from their Guantanamo Diary presentation of April 25.
Executive producer is Joe Crawford

Ins and Outs of Money – There’s Something (Costly) in the Air

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It’s tempting to switch on the air conditioning when temperatures rise outside. Careful—that cool air is expensive. By being money smart, though, you can avoid turning on the A/C in the first place, and use it wisely when you do turn it on.

Number of New HIV Cases in Scott County Plateaus

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Scott County, Indiana, has seen a surge in positive HIV cases in recent months, but data from the Indiana State Department of Health is showing the number of positive cases may be reaching a plateau. WFHB News correspondent Jordan Guskey looked in to what the numbers mean and what could explain the magnitude of the outbreak for today’s WFHB Community report.

Daily Local News – May 19, 2015

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Tomorrow night the Bloomington City Council is set to decide whether to borrow forty-eight
million dollars to pay for major projects including Switchyard Park; The City of
Bloomingtion is limited in what it can do to respond to the recent repeal of Indiana’s
Common Construction Wage law; The Monroe County Election Board has rejected all thirteen
provisional ballots Bloomington voters cast during the May 5th primary election.

FEATURE
Scott County, Indiana, has seen a surge in positive HIV cases in recent months, but data
from the Indiana State Department of Health is showing the number of positive cases may be
reaching a plateau. WFHB News correspondent Jordan Guskey looked in to what the numbers
mean and what could explain the magnitude of the outbreak for today’s WFHB Community
report.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
There’s Something (Costly) in the Air; It’s tempting to switch on the air conditioning when
temperatures rise outside. Careful—that cool air is expensive. By being money smart,
though, you can avoid turning on the A/C in the first place, and use it wisely when you do
turn it on.

CREDITS
Anchors: Casey Kuhn, Chris Martin
Today’s headlines were written by Kara Tullman
Along with David Murphy for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television
Services.
Our feature was produced by Jordan Guskey
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Ryan Stacy and edited by Dan Withered, in
partnership with the Monroe County Public Library and The United Way of Monroe County.
Our engineer is Harrison Wagner
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.

Books Unbound – “Exploring with Robert McAlmon, Part Three”

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Robert McAlmon was a ubiquitous presence among the “Lost Generation” of American expatriate writers during the 1920s and ’30s in Paris. Bisexual, he entered into a marriage of appearances with the heiress and lesbian writer Bryher. With her father’s great wealth, he started a press that published the early work of many of the most famous Modernists—and paid bar tabs and hotel bills for his friends Ernest Hemingway and James Joyce. By the end of the 1930s, he was sinking into obscurity, bitterness, and alcoholism.

Books Unbound’s three-part program on this lesser-known Modernist concludes with poems and prose pieces from McAlmon’s 1921 collection Explorations, with a third short story from his fiction collection A Hasty Bunch (1922) to complement “A Vacation’s Job” and “A Boy’s Discovery” in parts one and two.

The first segment features McAlmon’s complete cycle of poems about what was then still the novel sensation of flying in an aircraft: “Aero-Rhythms” (Joan Hawkins), “Perspicuity” (Cynthia Wolfe), “Etherism” (Hawkins), “Aero-Metre” (Erin Livingston), “Consummation” (Tony Brewer), “Volplanetor” (Wolfe), and “Aero-Laughter” (Frank Buczolich).

The short-short story “Light Woven into Wavespray,” read by Phil Kasper, infuses gorgeous descriptions of seaside leisure with McAlmon’s pervasive ennui and contempt, and intimations of his sexuality. The central panel of the episode is “Mood Decisions,” a prose sequence (read by Brewer and Livingston) rife with biting humor, sharp images, and snark.

The episode closes with more poetry. Now almost a century old, the prescient “White Males” (Hawkins) treats its titular subject as a violent species facing extinction. Also included are “Today’s Music” (Wolfe), “Words” (Buczolich), and “A Modern’s Half Day” (Hawkins)

Special music for the episode comes from two classical composers who were active at the time of McAlmon’s literary career. The poems on flight are accompanied by excerpts from Igor Stravinsky’s symphonic poem “The Song of the Nightingale” (1917), conducted by Pierre Boulez and performed by the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra. McAlmon writes about Stravinsky in the prose piece “Thought Ghosts on Music” in Explorations:

“Strawinsky — a snigger chortled between Mozart and Schumann — ‘laughing up his sleeve at us, and not letting us in on the joke with titles as does Strauss,’ men behind me declared. The innovation jarred senses that ten conscientious years of musical training had grooved. An innovation that might cause them to retrain their senses. I could hear Strawinsky tittering up his sleeve, and hear the titter giggling along his ribs, making them to rattle — and that is another theme for modern music. I enjoyed Strawinsky. He might mean anything because he meant nothing.”

Additional music comes from Maurice Ravel’s Sonata for Violin and Cello, written during the time A Hasty Bunch and Explorations were published. The sonata is performed by Carlos Benito de la Gala and Alberto Gorrochategui Blanco on their album Kodaly and Ravel (KalilaDimna, 2011). Wind sound effect for the flight sequence was created by Mark DiAngelo via SoundBible.com.

Sarah Torbeck hosts, with announcer Jack Hanek. This episode was produced, written, and edited by Cynthia Wolfe, with production assistance from Heather Perry, Sarah Torbeck and Jack Hanek.

Executive producer: Joe Crawford
Theme music: The Impossible Shapes

Women in Media: Facing Inequality

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Do those things that terrify you. Say yes to your audience. Be a good person. That was all advice that a panel of media professionals gave to aspiring journalists late last month. The discussion occurred on the last day of class in J200, the Indiana University School of Journalism’s introductory course on writing and reporting. The four panelists were all women, and a segment of the talk focused on gender inequality in the line of duty. Photojournalist Caitlin O’Hara, former WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh, IU Office of the Provost communications director Jennifer Piurek, and veteran Bloomington newspaper editor Andrea Murray offer candid examples of sexism. Course instructor Chad Carrothers moderates the discussion in this WFHB community report.

Bring It On! – May 18, 2015

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William Hosea and Liz Mitchell welcome Jim Mitchell and Clarence Boone.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, William and Liz welcome Jim Mitchell and B.I.O. Producer Clarence Boone. They join our host for an open dialogue roundtable on current events of interest for the black community.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea and Liz Mitchell
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

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