Home > News (page 13)

Category Archives: News

Feed Subscription

Ins and Outs of Money – Level Up at the Library

Play

Kevin MacDowell, manager of Monroe County Public Library’s two new digital creativity centers, introduces us to Level Up, an all-ages productivity lab. All that’s needed to develop high-tech skills for saving AND earning money is a free library card—and a willingness to learn.

With Statehouse Fighting Over Education, Ritz Stuck in the Middle

Play

This year, Indiana Governor Mike Pence has called for the state’s legislative session to focus on education. Much of that focus has been directed toward Superintendent Glenda Ritz, with bills emerging to denounce her as chair of the State Board of Education. Some view the bills as partisan attacks, others see it as a necessary step for reform. WFHB news reporter Sarah Panfil brings you an overview.

Interchange – A Measure of Choice: Vaccine Opposition and Public Health

Play

“A Measure of Choice” explores the reasons that some parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children. The so-called “anti-vax” movement has been lumped in with what many in the popular press are calling a “war on science.” Along with trying to understand what the reasons are for this position on vaccinations, we’ll also examine the ethical and social justice issues surrounding these parental decisions and how they affect the public health.

Guests
Jennifer Reich is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Colorado-Denver whose research examines how individuals and families make decisions about healthcare, welfare, and policy. She has authored an article to be published last September in the Journal Gender & Society titled “Neoliberal Mothering and Vaccine Refusal.”

Stuart Yoak is Executive Director of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics at Indiana University. APPE is an international, multidisciplinary association advancing ethical understanding and practice in the classroom, the workplace, and society.

Discussed in the program:
Neoliberal Mothering and Vaccine Refusal

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Production and Research: Nancy Jones
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Local Middle School-Produced Documentary Wins National Award

Students from Batchelor Middle School in Bloomington took on issues with the No Child Left Behind Act in a documentary that just won a national award.

The students won Third Prize in a contest sponsored by C-SPAN. In order to participate, middle school and high school students from all over the nation had to answer the same question: how has a policy, legislation or action taken by one of the branches of the federal government affected you or your community?

Eighth Grade Students Sejal Rajamani, Nikki Nguyen and Piper Watson, with the support of their teacher, Jeff Rudkin, answered with their documentary titled “No Child Left Behind: Time to Change.”

“I think we’re emphasizing that No Child Left Behind is old and needs to change and standardized testing has a lot of flaws,” Rahamani says. “Although the government should be informed on how school’s are doing, standardized testing might not be the way to do it.”

When asked how No Child Left Behind has affected her life, she said it makes her feel stressed.

No Child Left Behind was passed under the George W. Bush administration. It has increased the time dedicated to standardised tests in the classroom. As a result, not only students, but also teachers and schools get evaluated solely on the performance of these tests. According to Rudkin other criteria should be taken into account.

“Do they do community service, things like that, a lot of things that play into a school’s grade rather than a single test that lasts a few weeks,” Rudkin says.

Many schools around the nation have also had to cut down on electives, to accommodate the time and money that taking this test demands.

“We’re lucky we have a school that still has electives and supports a well-rounded education,” Rudkin says. “But a lot of schools across the country are having to cut electives, like P.E., to focus on this test.

When asked about an alternative, Rudkin answered that the core idea of No Child Left Behind is commendable. He says it’s the way the law has been implemented through a single standardised test that fails to work.

The problem, says Rudkin, is that legislators are not willing to sit down to talk about the alternatives.

“The legislators aren’t willing to sit down and talk with teachers who have ideas on how to improve it,” he says.

For Nguyen, one of the students, the solution has to be found closer to home, within the community.

“I think we should bring it down to a local level so the people in the community can address what needs to be done because they probably know more about what’s going on in the community than the state or national government,” Nguyen says.

ISTEP+, the standardized test in the state of Indiana, is taken every Spring in subjects such as English and Math.

Daily Local News – March 10, 2015

Play

Students from Batchelor Middle School in Bloomington took on issues with the No Child Left Behind Act in a documentary that just won a national award; A study out of Indiana University is bringing attention to issues with wetland areas across the country;

FEATURE
This year Indiana Governor Mike Pence has called for the state’s legislative session to focus on education. Much of that focus has been directed toward Superintendent Glenda Ritz, with bills emerging to denounce her as chair of the State Board of Education. Some view the bills as partisan attacks, others see it as a necessary step for reform.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Kevin MacDowell, manager of Monroe County Public Library’s two new digital creativity centers, introduces us to Level Up, an all-ages productivity lab. All that’s needed to develop high-tech skills for saving AND earning money is a free library card—and a willingness to learn.

CREDITS
You’ve been listening to the Daily Local News on WFHB,
supported by Bloomingfoods Market and Deli, your locally-grown co-op grocery.
Today’s headlines were written by Amanda Marino and Carmen Gozalo
Our feature was produced by Sarah Panfil
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Ryan Stacy and edited by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library and The United Way of Monroe County.
Our engineer is Joe Crawford
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Managing Producer is Alycin Bektesh,
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.
For WFHB, I’m Casey Kuhn.

Bring It On! – March 9, 2015

Play

Clarence Boone and William Hosea welcome Janet Cheatham Bell and Audrey McCluskey.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, Clarence and William welcome Janet Cheatham Bell and Audrey McCluskey. They join us to share their observations on society and their reflections on their joint book signing and presentations billed as “Righting History, Writing Truth”, during the City of Bloomington Black History Month kick-off and Reception on February 5th.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Clarence Boone and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Joe Crawford
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Employee Parking Garage Proposal

Tonight, the employee parking garage proposal from the Monroe County Commission will once again come before the Bloomington Plan Commission. Today, we spoke to Chris Sturbaum, a member of the Bloomington City Council and a member of the Plan Commission, about the proposal. He first explained why the initial county proposal was sent back for revision and what changes have been made in response.

“When the first proposal came out it was taller and it was uglier…we’ve been talking to them about making the front more attractive” said Sturbaum.

Sturbaum says the building’s proposed height is still a concern to the Commission. At 94 feet, it is considerably above the 50 foot standard limit for the area. But the city has approved several recent building proposals with heights more than 50 feet. That includes some immediate neighbors of the proposed garage. Furthermore, Sturbaum says the county’s efforts to keep most of its offices and other facilities in the downtown core, which complements the City’s efforts to densify this area, increase his willingness to approve the county garage proposal. New buildings in the area have also been required to include ground floor commercial space, in order to increase foot traffic and enliven the area generally. Sturbaum describes how the County has responded to this building provision.

Sturbaum said, “What’s peculiar about this building is it is taking the place of what they call “the cage” which is barbwire-topped metal fencing that technically is the overflow if there was some kind of emergency in the jail.”

Sturbaum says this unique county need should be accommodated by the Plan Commission. The county proposal also includes rooftop solar panels to power lighting for the facility. There is also provision for 10 electric vehicle plug in outlets and 20 spaces for bike parking. Sturbaum assumes that if future increases in need for these amenities can be relatively easily accommodated. Another issue is whether or not parking spaces in the county facility will be available to the general public during the working day or, especially, during the evening and on weekends and holidays.

“That was a request I specifically made and said, ‘the market is right across the street, could we work some kind of arrangement where market visitors could park in that garage?’ and what a great set up it would be” said Sturbaum.

Tonight’s Plan Commission Meeting is in the Bloomington Common Council Chambers, at City Hall, in the Showers Building, located at 401 North Morton Street, in downtown Bloomington. It was scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m. The general public is welcome to attend.

Enrollment in Indiana’s School Vouchers Program Rapidly Increasing

Play

The Center for Evaluation and Education Policy has found that enrollment in Indiana’s school vouchers program is rapidly increasing. News Director Joe Crawford spoke with a researcher at the Center for today’s WFHB community report.

Daily Local News – March 9, 2015

Play

A study out of Indiana University shows more and more students are using the state’s school voucher program;Tonight, the employee parking garage proposal from the Monroe County Commission will once again come before the Bloomington Plan Commission;The Bloomington City Council has approved a resolution finalizing a tax cut for a development on S. Walnut St.; Virologist Susana Lopez of the National University of Mexico will be at IU this Wednesday to discuss her crusade against gastroenteritis as part of the 34th Joan Wood Lecture Series.

FEATURE
The Center for Evaluation and Education Policy has found that enrollment in Indiana’s school vouchers program is rapidly increasing. News Director Joe Crawford spoke with a researcher at the Center for today’s WFHB community report.

ACTIVATE!
Your WFHB weekly segment spotlighting people working for positive change in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Doug Storm and Maria McKinley
Our engineer is Chris Martin
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker, along with the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Amanda Marino along with Alycin Bektesh for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by David Murphy
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Managing Producer is Alycin Bektesh
Executive producer is Joe Crawford

Activate! – Buskirk-Chumley Theater: Donna Cohen

Play

Donna Cohen shares anecdotes and her experience volunteering at the Buskirk-Chumley theater. Also, three volunteer opportunities available through the Buskirk.

LINKS
Bloomington Volunteer Network: Buskirk-Chumley Theater
Buskirk-Chumley Theater

Scroll To Top