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Daily Local News – August 29, 2013

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The Indiana Department of Homeland Security is gauging Indiana citizens’ readiness for emergencies and disasters through a brief online survey; Royale Hair Parlor has been awarded $2,500 by Proctor and Gamble’s Wella Hairdressers at the Heart Charity Challenge that took place in May; The City of Bloomington’s Council for Community Accessibility (CCA) is seeking nominees for the annual awards ceremony that will take place on October 29th; Indiana now has a one-stop site for information on prescription drug abuse; Governor Mike Pence will lead his first gubernatorial effort to draw overseas investments and ultimately jobs to Indiana by way of a week-long trip to Japan from September 5th to 15th; The Indiana Hoosiers take to the field tonight in Memorial Stadium for the opening game of their 2013 football season.

FEATURE
Big Red Liquors and Indiana State Senator Jim Merritt announced today that the statewide liquor chain will be helping with an information campaign about the Indiana Lifeline Law, authored by Merrit. The law, which began on July First of last year, provides immunity to citizens seeking medical help for someone who has consumed too much alcohol. WFHB News Director spoke with Merrit, along with IU student President Jose Mitjavila about the law, and student’s awareness of the immunity opportunity, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOICES IN THE STREET
Our weekly public opinion feature Voices in the Street asks about YOUR plans for Labor Day weekend.

CREDITS
Anchors: Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Mike Glab and Jalisa Ransom
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television Services
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley
Our production engineer is Sarah Hettrick
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Indiana Lifeline Law Promoted

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Big Red Liquors and Indiana State Senator Jim Merritt announced today that the statewide liquor chain will be helping with an information campaign about the Indiana Lifeline Law, authored by Merrit. The law, which began on July First of last year, provides immunity to citizens seeking medical help for someone who has consumed too much alcohol. WFHB News Director spoke with Merrit, along with IU student President Jose Mitjavila about the law, and student’s awareness of the immunity opportunity, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Local Hair Salon Wins $2,500 From P&G For Local Charity

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Royale Hair Parlor has been awarded $2,500 by Proctor and Gamble’s Wella Hairdressers at the Heart Charity Challenge that took place in May.

“We won $2,500 for our charity of choice, CASA. We chose this because of our children’s art show that helped raise money for CASA last May,” said Community Outreach Coordinator, Mary Lecount.

Royale Hair Parlor located in downtown Bloomington, has an Auxiliary Gallery with Gallery Walk that allows local artist to show off their artwork. Before the challenge the Parlor displayed and auctioned off artwork done by children and they entered the Charity Challenge to raise money to help continue their community outreach

The Parlor put on the art show to help donate money for Monroe County Court Appointed Special Advocates. CASA is a volunteer program that provides representation in juvenile court for child victims of physical abuse.

Lecount says that they will use the money and match a grant in their holiday newsletter, matching holiday donations to CASA.

The Parlor plans on putting on another children’s art show next year as well as other art events to help support local artists in the community.

Indiana Department of Homeland Security Surveys Hoosiers On Disaster And Emergency Readiness

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The Indiana Department of Homeland Security is gauging Indiana citizens’ readiness for emergencies and disasters through a brief online survey.

Ian Connor, public information officer with the Indiana Department of Homeland Security said the survey will help the public safety community gain a greater understanding of how prepared Indiana residents are and how to help increase that preparedness.

“We are doing the survey to engage Indiana citizen’s readiness in the case of a disaster. We want to know how prepared they feel to help us plan how we do our messaging. In the survey we ask if they have preparedness kits and how they get their emergency information like through Facebook or TV,” Connor said.

This is not the first time IDHS conduct the survey. The survey was last conducted in 2011. According to Connor, one of the most compelling findings then was the difference in the level of preparedness in different parts of the state.

“We found that citizens in the northwest parts of the state seem more ready than other parts. There is also a disparity between those who felt they were prepared in urban or rural areas. People in rural areas seem to be more prepared,” Connor says.

Residents of rural areas were nearly 12 percent more likely to be prepared than residents in urban areas. Three of the four highest-scoring regions, based on IDHS districts, were in the northwest portion of Indiana.

The Interstate 69 corridor from Marion to Allen counties showed a relatively low level of preparedness in the 2011 survey. The 10-minute online survey can be found on the IDHS website under the Featured Topics Section: “IDHS Citizen Preparedness Survey 2013.”

The survey will stay open until at least Friday, September 20, 2013.

IU Anthropologists Will Try Raising Funds Online For Research Project

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Four anthropology students from Indiana University are taking their funding request to the public. Crowd-funding websites like Kickstarter are becoming more and more popular as a way to fund all kinds of projects, big and small.

This group, studying in the lab of evolutionary anthropologist Michael Muehlenbein hopes to continue their study of how tourists and primates interact in South Africa by using these types of funds.

“The whole idea of ecotourism is that you take only photos and leave only footprints. But the reality is that unregulated ecotourism can have a variety of potential costs. One of those costs being the welfare of endangered species that we’re interested in going to visit,” Muehlenbein says.

Diseases transmitted from humans to primates can be disastrous to wild primate populations. Primates can transmit diseases like malaria right back to humans. The goal for these researchers is to study what people know about primate and human diseases and their attitudes towards them. These and other factors can influence disease transmission.

“Humans are attracted to monkeys and apes, they’re cute, they’re fuzzy and they act like us. Non-human primates share a lot of diseases with humans and we know there are a lot of instances of disease transmission from them to humans, HIV being a good example. So, I wanted to wrap my brain around the decisions tourists make that might influence the transmission of diseases like that,” Muehlenbein says.

The students helping Muehlenbein in his research hope to reach out to the community by involving them in the funding and researching process. They plan on using Microryza, a website dedicated to helping smaller science projects reach their funding goals.

Muehlenbein thinks that becoming involved in this kind of research project could mean so much to the science community.

“I think a lot of younger people are not as involved in science as they should be. In general, I think the public loves celebrities, but I think they should love scientists just as much. As a donor, they have an investment more than just money because we have multiple incentives. We want to involve them every step of the way, telling them why we’re doing this, from the inception of the project to the very end,” Muehlenbein says.

The goal is to raise $7,500  to pay for plane tickets and the research would  take about three weeks.

 

By Casey Kuhn

EcoReport – Mike Ryan: National Weather Service

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Mike Ryan from the National Weather Service talks about this summer’s weather and why global warming is not a linear function.

EcoReport August, 29, 2013

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Mike Ryan from the National Weather Service talks about this summer’s weather and why global warming is not a linear function.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

CREDITS
Anchors: Rebecca Ellsworth, Dan Young
This week’s news stories were written by Joe Crawford, Linda Greene, Norm Holy and Chris Martin.
This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Weltsee.
Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered.
Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller and Dan Young.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Voices in the Street – The Labor Day Weekend: What are you planning?

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Our weekly public opinion feature Voices in the Street asks about YOUR plans for Labor Day weekend.

Standing Room Only – Nature Deficit Disorder

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On April 12th Richard Louv  spoke at the Reynold E. Carlson lecture. His talk centered on the importance of nature to the sociological and psychological health of humans, particularly in large cities. Richard Louv is a journalist and author of eight books on the connection between family nature and community, and he coined the term “Nature-deficit-disorder.  This lecture was recorded on location at the IU Memorial Union by WFHB correspondents for Standing Room Only.

Bloomington Beware! – Student Loan Pitfalls

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Paying for college is a lot more expensive — and a lot riskier — than it used to be. Here’s the Cliff’s Notes version of what the risks are, and how to avoid drowning in financial quicksand after you graduate.

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