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My Health Matters – Ecotours: Steve Higgs

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Steve discusses Ecotours and More’s mission to celebrate and share Southern Indiana’s natural beauty and how it relates to physical activity.

Daily Local News – September 10, 2013

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The controversial ‘Right to Work’ pushed through by the state republicans last year suffered its first legal setback last week; Senator Dan Coats has proposed legislation  to delay the implementation of Obamacare (the Affordable Care Act) until at least 2015; Management at the local GE Appliances plant has informed its hourly employees that one third of them will be laid off; Following a bank robbery yesterday afternoon, a suspect has been apprehended and detained by the Bloomington Police Department, charged with two counts of robbery and a charge of resisting law enforcement; Brown County State Park is offering a workshop for photographers on October 19th; Gary Moore will teach some of the tips and techniques he used to document landscapes in his photo book called Brown County Mornings.

FEATURE
Adventures in Pioneering a Model System of Symbiosis
Joan Wood spent twelve years in the Indiana University Department of Biology, and is the namesake of an annual lecture promoting women in the sciences. Biologist Margaret McFall-Ngai is in Bloomington this week and to present “Adventures in Pioneering a Model System of Symbiosis” – this year’s Joan Wood lecture. WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh has the report for today’s Daily Local News feature exclusive.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Interested in started your own business? Sarah and Ashley talk with Jason Carnes, the Assistant Director from the City’s Economic and Sustainable Development Department. Jason shares tips on how to get started and resources for success.

CREDITS
Anchors: Bill Daugherty, Shayne Laughter
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Yvonne Cheng
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh
Our editor and engineer is Drew Daudelin
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Jason Evans Groth
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Activate! – Bloomington Arts for All: Alanna Lutrell and Jon Holland

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Alanna Lutrell and Jon Holland discuss the need for creative expression for all persons and describe how their Bloomington Arts for All tries to provide that expression for disadvantaged youth, and talk about how they would like to expand to help people recovering from mental illness and addiction.

Right to Work ruled unconstitutional

Judge John M. Sedia of Lake Superior Court made a ruling on Right to Work legislation this evening, stating that the recent Indiana legislation is unconstitutional. Sedia agreed with the petitioners,  the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150, that  the legislation violates Article 1 Section 21 of the state constitution. The ruling will most likely be appealed and the case would then head to the Indiana Supreme Court. Indiana was the first state to pass Right to Work legislation in almost two decades when the bill went through in 2012.

Bring It On! – September 9, 2013

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William Hosea and Bev Smith welcome B.I.O. contributors Gladys DeVane and Liz Mitchell to the show.

PART ONE
Although Indiana law clearly prohibited slavery, indentured servitude, a different kind of slavery, was a common practice within Indiana territory during the early years of statehood. Three Indiana women known to petition the Indiana Supreme court for release from indentured agreements were Mary Bateman Clark, Polly Strong and a woman only known as “Elizabeth”.

Long-time B.I.O. contributors Gladys DeVane and Liz Mitchell both have done research on the topic of Indiana indentured servants, and come on the show to share their information with Bev and William

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea and Bev Smith
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Indiana Assess A-F

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Indiana’s former superintendent for public instruction, Tony Bennett, was criticized earlier this summer after it was revealed he apparently played favorites when assigning grades to the state’s K-12 schools. Emails from Bennett showed he was upset that a charter school in Indianapolis, the Christel House Academy, was going to receive a C when he thought it should get an A. Christel House was founded by a major political donor, and Bennett helped change the grading formula so the school would receive a better grade. The revelations caused Bennett to lose his most recent job, as Florida Education Commissioner. Now, a 58-page report requested by the state legislature indicates that, although Bennett did change the rules, he then applied the new rules to other schools besides Christel House. For more on what that means, correspondent Joe Crawford talked today with the president of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education, who is a critic of the state’s system for grading schools. We bring you that interview for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Daily Local News- September 9, 2013

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Enrollment for the fall semester at Indiana University Bloomington is up, compared to last year’s numbers; Once again, the Bloomington campus of IU has announced a theme for this academic year’s cultural activities; Bloomington peace groups will hold a vigil on 9/11 to oppose the possible attack on Syria. Correspondent Chris Martin has more; The Indiana University Office of Sustainability has established an innovative partnership between Indiana University Bloomington and the Local Growers Guild.

FEATURE
Indiana Assess A-F
Indiana’s former superintendent for public instruction, Tony Bennett, was criticized earlier this summer after it was revealed he apparently played favorites when assigning grades to the state’s K-12 schools. Emails from Bennett showed he was upset that a charter school in Indianapolis, the Christel House Academy, was going to receive a C when he thought it should get an A. Christel House was founded by a major political donor, and Bennett helped change the grading formula so the school would receive a better grade. The revelations caused Bennett to lose his most recent job, as Florida Education Commissioner. Now, a 58-page report requested by the state legislature indicates that, although Bennett did change the rules, he then applied the new rules to other schools besides Christel House. For more on what that means, correspondent Joe Crawford talked today with the president of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education, who is a critic of the state’s system for grading schools. We bring you that interview for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

ACTIVATE
Alanna Lutrell and Jon Holland discuss the need for creative expression for all persons and describe how their Bloomington Arts for All tries to provide that expression for disadvantaged youth, and talk about how they would like to expand to help people recovering from mental illness and addiction.

CREDITS
Anchors: MAria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy Yvonne Cheng, and Chris Martin
Our engineers are Chris Martin and Lauren Glapa
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin
Jennifer Whitaker produced Activate!
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Local groups plan vigil to oppose attack on Syria

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The vigil will begin at 5pm Wednesday on the Courthouse Square and will be in remembrance of those that died on September 11th, 2001, the civilian and military causalities of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and those who have died on both sides of the ongoing Syrian Civil War.

Hola Bloomington – September 6, 2013

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Hostess Jenny Gibson and Valeria de Castro interview Cristy Padilla, an Ivy Tech student and a DREAMer. She talks about the bill SB207. The eco-report with Ramon Tristani, “Desde los pasillos..”, the local news and the events of the week.

Books Unbound – A Study in Scarlet, Part 2

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In this episode:
“A Study in Scarlet” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

About this Author:
Born on 22 May 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Arthur Conan Doyle went on to study medicine at Edinburgh University from 1876 to 1881, during which time he began writing short stories. His first published work was “The Mystery of Sasassa Valley,” which appeared in 1879. With the publication of A Study in Scarlet, Conan Doyle created the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson who would make him famous. He based the deductive reasoning that characterized Holmes on the techniques of Joseph Bell, one of his instructors in medical school. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died on 7 July 1930, far more famous as a writer than as a doctor.

About this book:
Originally titled “A Tangled Skein.” A Study in Scarlet first appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual (1887), and was published as a book in July, 1888. Twenty-seven year-old Conan Doyle received £25 for full rights to the story, which he had written in three weeks in 1886. The work, the first of only four full-length Sherlock Holmes novels, introduced the consulting detective and the faithful Dr. Watson, who also chronicled their adventures in fifty-six short stories to make the Baker Street team the most famous pair in detective fiction. Although it attracted little notice at the time, it’s portrayal of Mormonism soon became controversial.

About this program:
Books burn; ideas endure. Books Unbound is a weekly showcase of literary works banned by those who fear the power of the pen. The program promotes literary reading and curiosity, challenging listeners to consider viewpoints that may be different from our own. Each week we bring you literature prohibited by governments, schools, and religious institutions. In the words of French philosopher Emile-Auguste Chartier, “nothing is as dangerous as an idea, when it’s the only one you’ve got.” Books Unbound is a production of community radio WFHB in Bloomington, Indiana.

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