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Daily Local News – September 3, 2013

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Indiana Governor Mike Pence maintained his resistance to adopting the Affordable Care Act by announcing today that Indiana will remain using the current economic model titled the Healthy Indiana Plan to provide Medicaid health insurance to Hoosiers; A private coalition of environmental groups has forced Duke Energy Indiana to agree to close its old coal fired power plants in Terre Haute; With the inaugural issue of Network Science, a new journal published by Cambridge University Press, coordinating editor Stanley Wasserman brings together scholars from fields across the academic spectrum whose interests converge upon the quickly evolving field of network science;The fall migration will likely bring huge flocks of waterfowl and shore birds to Goose Pond,  the 8,000 acre preserve managed by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

FEATURE
Protesters Urge No Bombing of Syria
Leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties in Congress said today they support the Obama administration’s call for a military strike on Syria. The administration, especially Secretary of State John Kerry, has said the U.S. should attack in response to the alleged use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government on August 21st. But as some in Washington continue to make the case for intervention, protesters in Bloomington are calling for diplomacy instead. A crowd gathered outside the Monroe County Courthouse last night to protest military action in Syria. Correspondent Joe Crawford has that story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Unfortunately two of the biggest barriers to an exercise routine are time and money. While we can’t put more hours in your day, Ashley and Sarah can help you keep fitness affordable.

CREDITS
Anchors: Shayne Laughter, Bill Daugherty
Today’s headlines were written by Alycin Bektesh, David Murphy, Yvonne Cheng, and Anson Shupe
Today’s feature was produced by Joe Crawford
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe county public library and the united way of Monroe county
Our engineer is Harrison Wagner
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Protesters Urge No Bombing of Syria

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Leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties in Congress said today they support the Obama administration’s call for a military strike on Syria. The administration, especially Secretary of State John Kerry, has said the U.S. should attack in response to the alleged use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government on August 21st. But as some in Washington continue to make the case for intervention, protesters in Bloomington are calling for diplomacy instead. A crowd gathered outside the Monroe County Courthouse last night to protest military action in Syria. Correspondent Joe Crawford has that story for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

My Health Matters – Caregiver Workshop: Nancy Kalina

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Nancy Kalina, a Bloomington Life Coach, explains the Caregivers Workshops in September.

IU Professor Contributes To New ‘Network Science’ Journal

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With the inaugural issue of Network Science, a new journal published by Cambridge University Press, coordinating editor Stanley Wasserman brings together scholars from fields across the academic spectrum whose interests converge upon the quickly evolving field of network science. Wasserman has a Ph.D from Harvard University nd the idea for the journal was launched about four years ago, said Stanley Wasserman, Rudy Professor in the Departments of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Statistics at IU.

“Networks, we have realized are everywhere. From Facebook to traffic, and there are unifying theories that everyone in network science uses,” Wasserman says.

According to Wasserman, in the 21st century, with the recognition globalization of the world along with the growth of the Internet and social media, network methods seem an increasingly fitting and appropriate way to examine many aspects of the social and physical world, and the individuals, organizations and cellular processes within it.

“Networks are individual units that are linked by relational ties. It is very inter-disciplinary, including physics and sociology and psychology and many others,” Wasserman says.

Topics, such as friendship network and social status, network dependencies in international trade, are covered in the first issue of Network Science.

The journal can be viewed online on the website of Cambridge Journal Online.

Interchange – Choctaw Academy: Educating the Vanquished

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This week on Interchange, host Doug Storm speaks with Christina Snyder, an associate professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at Indiana University. Snyder’s scholarship focuses on Native North America and on the histories of colonialism and slavery.  She is the author of Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America.  Snyder instructs us about Choctaw Academy, the first national Indian boarding school in the United States. Open from 1825 to 1848, the school was located on the plantation of prominent politician Richard Mentor Johnson. During Choctaw Academy’s lifespan, the United States transitioned from an east-coast nation to a continental power. The story of Choctaw Academy reveals how the emerging U.S. empire developed a tandem approach, violence and acculturation, to exert economic, political, and cultural influence far beyond even its extensive territory, and the complex ways in which colonized people met these challenges.

Duke Agrees To Close Old Terre Haute Coal Power Plants

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A private coalition of environmental groups has forced Duke Energy Indiana to agree to close its old coal-fired power plants in Terre Haute.

The settlement between Duke and the coalition, composed of the Sierra Club, Citizens Action Coalition, Valley Watch, and Save the Valley, was reached before an Indiana Department of Environment administrative law judge. The settlement requires Duke to cease burning coal at most of its Wabash River coal-fired power plant in Vigo County and to invest in new renewable energy projects.

In return, the environmental coalition will drop its appeal of the air pollution permit issued by IDEM to Duke for its Edwardsport coal-gasification and combined-cycle power plant to the south.

We spoke to Jodi Perras, of the Indiana branch of the Sierra Club, about this settlement, as well as another parallel suit concerning Duke.

She said that Duke agreed to retire their coal-fired units and that there was a commitment from Duke to invest in some clean-energy projects.

The result is that a total of 668 megawatts of coal-fired power will come offline.

Currently, Indiana gets more than 90 percent of its electricity from burning coal.

Besides emitting more green-house gases than other fossil fuels, coal-fired power plants are also the country’s biggest source of mercury, sulfur dioxide pollution, carbon pollution, and many other pollutants that can trigger heart attacks and contribute to respiratory problems.

Duke also agreed to pursue either a new feed-in tariff program to purchase at least 30 megawatts of solar power from its Hoosier customers or to purchase or install at least 15 megawatts of wind or solar generating capacity from new facilities built in Indiana.

A feed-in tariff enables customers to earn money from their own solar panels by selling excess power back to electric utilities.

“Duke said previously that they thought they would retire the units at Wabash river because of the mercury and the toxin rule that’s supposed to go into effect in 2015. Those are old plans from the 50’s or 60’s but the mercury rule is being challenged in federal court. If we were to lose that case, Duke still has to retire those units by 2018,” says Perras.

Four coal burning units are required to close by 2015 and the sixth by 2018. While they have settled this suit, the coalition is still continuing with its parallel suit against Duke before the Indiana Court of Appeals to overturn Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission decisions regarding the Edwardsport plant.

In December of 2012, the IURC approved additional rate increases tied to the Edwardsport coal gasification plant which would allow Duke to pass on rising construction costs to power consumers.

The plant is currently $1.6 billion over budget and still not operating at full capacity after eight years of design, construction, and testing.

“We have briefs that are due on Monday so we have been working on that and there’s an opportunity for the folks involved to do a reply brief. The court of appeals will probably schedule those and it’ll take several months before the court issues a decision,” Perras says.

There are several issue in question in this suit: whether the IURC violated the law by failing to consider the long-term costs to Duke Energy ratepayers of controlling the plant’s carbon pollution.

This issue was raised in testimony by citizens groups and ignored in the IURC’s decision, in violation of Indiana law; whether the IURC should have appointed a Special Administrative Law Judge to conduct a formal investigation into reports of behind-closed-doors communications, undue influence, conflicts of interest, and other misconduct involving high-level officials of Duke Energy and the IURC and whether the IURC failed to act as an impartial judge by directing Duke Energy to hire an outside consultant to monitor problems at Edwardsport and report to the IURC on its progress, and then refusing to place the reports into the public record.

This scandal involving conflict of interest between state regulators and Duke has resulted in several firings and transfers but no reversal of the resulting tainted regulatory rulings.

The Ins and Outs of Money – Financial Fitness

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Unfortunately two of the biggest barriers to an exercise routine are time and money. While they can’t put more hours in your day, Ashley and Sarah can help you keep fitness affordable.

Daily Local News – Septempter 2, 2013

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Labor Day is upon us! Our WFHB correspondents address labor movements in today’s economy and more on today’s Daily Local News Labor Day Special.

Bring It On! – September 2, 2013

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The Custom House – Henceforth Be Masterless: D. H. Lawrence on the Idea of America (Extended Cut)

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We like to think of the old-fashioned American classics as children’s books. Just childishness, on our part. The old American art-speech contains an alien quality, which belongs to the American continent and to nowhere else. But, of course, so long as we insist on reading the books as children’s tales, we miss all that.

That’s a line from the introductory chapter to D. H. Lawrence’s Studies in Classic American Literature. We’ll explore this spirited and vital work of appreciation and criticism as a great investigation of the body and soul in America Letters.

In this episode of The Custom House we let D. H. Lawrence do the talking. His Studies in Classic American Literature is a powerful and incisive investigation of American personality done through a thorough reading the literature of  “this evening land”.  For the radio we introduce the book and then present a reading of Chapter One, “The Spirit of Place.”

The extended cut replaces Chapter One with excerpts from the chapters on Whitman, Benjamin Franklin, and Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

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