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Report Shows Recovery Has Not Benefited Most Hoosiers

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A recently released report into income and poverty in Indiana has concluded that the continuing recovery from the great recovery has not benefitted most Hoosiers. The report, entitled ‘No Progress’, from the Indiana Institute for Working Families, there has been no significant change in the poverty rate for the state, since the recession supposedly ended last year, and average incomes have actually continued their decade long decline. The decline in wages and the increase in poverty over the last decade in Indiana has surpassed both that of the country as a whole and that of our neighboring states.

Furthermore, the state unemployment rate has been above the national average for one full year. Indiana’s high unemployment rate is at least partly attributed to the continuing barriers in the way of people attaining post-secondary educational training. Obstacles to educational attainment continues to be a barrier to high-wage growth.

The Daily Local News spoke to Derek Thomas, Senior Policy Analyst with the Institute. He first talked about poverty in Indiana.”Since 2000, Indiana saw a 58.7 percent increase, that’s the fifth largest in the U.S. In 2007, the poverty rate was 12.3 percent.”Currently, fifteen point six percent of Hoosiers live in poverty. It is much worse for younger residents, with over twenty-two percent of all state children living in poverty, and twenty-seven point two of children under five years of age in poverty.

The study next looked at income in the state. It found that Median Household Income in Indiana is over six percent below what it was when the recession began in 2008. The decline in income since the year 2000 has been the fourth largest in the country, similarly the worst among our neighbors except for Michigan.

This poverty and low income is exacerbated by the relatively low educational levels of Hoosiers. And, the percent of state adults with secondary and post-secondary degrees has not improved significantly over the last year. The institute has suggest several policy measures that could quickly alleviate some of these social-economic problems.

“First of all, we recommend the incretin the earn and income tax credit. It’s a federal credit for low to moderate working family. The credit reduces the tax burden. So, it offsets pay roll and income taxes. It’s also refundable, meaning if the credit exceeds the tax, the credit will given it back to the family.”

The second recommendation was for Indiana to enact a $25,000 tax floor, where a family of four earning less than this amount would not be charge income tax. Currently, Indiana is one of only 15 states that tax people below the federal poverty level of 23 thousand for a family of four and 11 thousand for an individual. The third recommendation is for the state to address the so-called cliff effect of work support programs, which Thomas explains for us, using the example of Indianapolis.

“In Marion County, a single-parent of two children, for example, post from 15 dollars per hour that parent losses about more than 8,000 dollars in childcare benefits. In this single parent family raises two children, childcare is important. Works program, means that you are only eligible for childcare if you are working. But what happens is that once you reach the certain address hold, the top level of eligibility lose it all.”

Consequently, employees would be hesitant to seek such an modest pay increase which creates a so-called poverty trap, impeding people’s socio-economic upward mobility. The report also recommends an increase in the minimum wage and indexing it to the cost of living index, and making it easier for Hoosiers to access higher education institutions and staying there until completion of their program.

Thomas concludes saying state policy makers should pursue these remedies.”We are optimistic that the message that self-deficiency is something that everyone embraces.”

Almost half of Hoosier children are low income, defined as below 200% of the official national poverty threshold. These poverty rates are the fifth worst in the nation and worse than all neighboring states except for Michigan, the home of bankrupt Detroit. The full report can be viewed on-line at: www.incap.org/2013povertyday.

Bring It On! – Septmber 23, 2013

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William Hosea and Cornelius Wright along with Bev Smith and Eric love, welcome James C. Wimbush, Vice President of the Office of Diversity, Equity and Multicultural Affairs at IU.

PART ONE
Back in August, IU President Michael A. McRobbie selected James C. Wimbush, dean of the University Graduate School, as the successor to Dr. Edwin Marshall as the vice president for the Office of Diversity Equity and Multicultural Affairs.

Vice President Wimbush, who will continue in his position as dean, has served as IU’s top graduate school administrator for the past seven years and has been a professor at the IU Kelley School of Business since 1991.

Recently, Bring It On requested and was granted special access with Vice President to acquaint himself with our listeners and discuss his vision for DEMA. What followed is a prerecorded interview featuring Bring It On contributors Bev Smith and Eric Love.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea and Cornelius Wright
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Indiana Sierra Club on Carbon Limits for Coal Plants

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Under rules announced last week by the Environmental Protection Agency, new power plants will be limited in how much carbon they can emit into the atmosphere. The new rule is expected to most dramatically affect coal-fired plants, which will be forced to capture at least some of the carbon they release. Both supporters and detractors of the rules say they will make it more difficult to build new, financially viable coal plants. The Hoosier Chapter of the Sierra Club has often brought attention to the environmental hazards of coal power. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford spoke with Jody Perras, from the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, about the potential effects of the rules for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

Daily Local News – September 23, 2013

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A report released today entitled “No Progress” from the Indiana Institute for Working Families shows there has been no significant change in the poverty rate for the state; A law that requires increased reporting from Bloomington’s pawn shops passed the City Council September 18th; The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center is making a call for submissions for the 2014 season; IU Health Bloomington will offer a free child car seat safety check this Thursday, September 26th.

FEATURE
Indiana Sierra Club on Carbon Limits for Coal Plants
Under rules announced last week by the Environmental Protection Agency, new power plants will be limited in how much carbon they can emit into the atmosphere. The new rule is expected to most dramatically affect coal-fired plants, which will be forced to capture at least some of the carbon they release. Both supporters and detractors of the rules say they will make it more difficult to build new, financially viable coal plants. The Hoosier Chapter of the Sierra Club has often brought attention to the environmental hazards of coal power. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford spoke with Jody Perras, from the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, about the potential effects of the rules for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

ACTIVATE
Caleb Young, music director for the Indiana Youth Musicians, talks about the organization, how it benefits both the youth involved and the wider Bloomington and Monroe County community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Chris Martin
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television Services
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford
Activate! was produced by Jennifer Whitaker and Dan Withered
Our engineers are Chris Martin and Lauren Glapa
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Activate! – Indiana Youth Musicians: Caleb Young

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Caleb Young, music director for the Indiana Youth Musicians, talks about the organization, how it benefits both the youth involved and the wider Bloomington and Monroe County community.

Hola Bloomington – September 20, 2013

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Hostess Luz Maria Lopez and Minerva Sosa talk about the NHHM (National Hispanic Heritage Month) “Mes de la Herencia Hispana”. A pre-recorded interview with Dr. Nieto-Phillips Associate Professor of Latino Studies at IU talks about the 40th Anniversary of La Casa, the NHHM and all the events for this month.

Also some interviews from people present at the MCPL the past Saturday and a special recognition to Melissa Britton. Marija Cacovski with “Su salud cuenta” and the events of the week.

Books Unbound – A Study in Scarlet, Part 4

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In this episode:
“A Study in Scarlet” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

About this Author:
Born on 22 May 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Arthur Conan Doyle went on to study medicine at Edinburgh University from 1876 to 1881, during which time he began writing short stories. His first published work was “The Mystery of Sasassa Valley,” which appeared in 1879. With the publication of A Study in Scarlet, Conan Doyle created the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson who would make him famous. He based the deductive reasoning that characterized Holmes on the techniques of Joseph Bell, one of his instructors in medical school. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died on 7 July 1930, far more famous as a writer than as a doctor.

About this book:
Originally titled “A Tangled Skein.” A Study in Scarlet first appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual (1887), and was published as a book in July, 1888. Twenty-seven year-old Conan Doyle received £25 for full rights to the story, which he had written in three weeks in 1886. The work, the first of only four full-length Sherlock Holmes novels, introduced the consulting detective and the faithful Dr. Watson, who also chronicled their adventures in fifty-six short stories to make the Baker Street team the most famous pair in detective fiction. Although it attracted little notice at the time, it’s portrayal of Mormonism soon became controversial.

About this program:
Books burn; ideas endure. Books Unbound is a weekly showcase of literary works banned by those who fear the power of the pen. The program promotes literary reading and curiosity, challenging listeners to consider viewpoints that may be different from our own. Each week we bring you literature prohibited by governments, schools, and religious institutions. In the words of French philosopher Emile-Auguste Chartier, “nothing is as dangerous as an idea, when it’s the only one you’ve got.” Books Unbound is a production of community radio WFHB in Bloomington, Indiana.

Volunteer Connection – September 20, 2013

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

Two Months of Sexploration

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Sexploration at IU is a university-led event that gathers student and community organizations to promote a sex-positive attitude and provide an educational experience for students about sexual orientation and gender expression on a personal and cultural level. This is the sixth year the IU Health Center has organized Sexploration events. Previously, Sexploration at IU has lasted one week. This year’s events have been expanded to two months to make more programs available to students throughout the semester. WFHB News Reporter Nash Hott spoke with Patrick Nagal, the chair of Sexploration 2013 and a health educator at the IU Health Center for today’s WFHB News Feature.

Daily Local News – September 20, 2013

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A Bloomington protest against the Keystone XL pipeline is scheduled for 9am tomorrow morning; In a recent statement representing campus laborers,  Peter Kaczmarczyk of the CWA Local 4730 describes his outrage at Indiana University’s decision to lay off and relocate 50 workers from the physical plant department and cut the hours of many others; The 2013 Distinguished Asian Pacific American Alumni Award will be awarded posthumously to the late Sophia Travis, former president of the Monroe County council and IU’s Asian Alumni Association; A meeting September 12th of the Monroe County Solid Waste Management District’s Board of Directors was partly spent addressing a problem of members not attending meetings.

FEATURE
Two Months of Sexploration
Sexploration at IU is a university-led event that gathers student and community organizations to promote a sex-positive attitude and provide an educational experience for students about sexual orientation and gender expression on a personal and cultural level. This is the sixth year the IU Health Center has organized Sexploration events. Previously, Sexploration at IU has lasted one week. This year’s events have been expanded to two months to make more programs available to students throughout the semester. WFHB News Reporter Nash Hott spoke with Patrick Nagal, the chair of Sexploration 2013 and a health educator at the IU Health Center for today’s WFHB News Feature.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Roscoe Medlock
Today’s headlines were written by Allison Schroeder and Lauren Glapa
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services
Our feature was produced by Nash Hott
Volunteer Connection is produced by Dan Withered in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

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