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Daily Local News- September 16th, 2013

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Senate Democratic Leader Tim Lanane laid out a plan to enroll students around the state in early childhood education programs; Bloomington will stage its first Open Streets event this weekend- joining a recent trend in larger cities around the world; Citizens from Morristown, Indiana are banding together to stop a gas-fired power plant proposed by tyhe Omaha-based company Tenaska.

FEATURE
Earlier this summer the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity announced it had reached a deal to relocate its frat house. The fraternity is currently located on east 3rd street. But the deal it made with Indiana University would put the new house in the University Courts neighborhood on the western edge of campus. The plan has upset some in Bloomington, partly because it requires the demolition of six historic homes. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford has that story for today’s WFHB feature.

ACTIVATE
Jodi Chatelain and Kenny Bundy talk about working at the Recovery Engagement Center.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley and Doug Storm,
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Yvonne Cheng,
Our Engineers are Lauren Glapa and Chris Martin,
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Activate is produced by Jennifer Whitaker
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Activate! – Recovery Engagement Center: Jodi Chatelain and Kenny Bundy

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Jodi Chatelain and Kenny Bundy talk about working at the Recovery Engagement Center and how involvement with the REC is an amazing experiencing for those volunteers in recovery and for those volunteers who are not. For the REC, service is the highest calling.

WFHB’s Interchange Investigates the US Constitution for “Constitution Day”

Did YOU know there was a thing called “Constitution Day”?  Is Constitution Day constitutional?  Do you know what the 3rd Amendment is?

 
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
 
A law establishing “Constitution Day” was created in 2004 with the passage of an amendment by Senator Robert Byrd to the Omnibus spending bill of 2004. Before this law was enacted, the holiday was known as “Citizenship Day”. In addition to renaming the holiday “Constitution Day and Citizenship Day,” the act mandates that all publicly funded educational institutions provide educational programming on the history of the American Constitution on that day. In May 2005, the United States Department of Education announced the enactment of this law and that it would apply to any school receiving federal funds of any kind. This holiday is not observed by granting time off work for federal employees.

For this edition of Interchange, host Lisa-Marie Napoli, a member of the PACE [Political and Civic Engagement] faculty, interviews Tim Lovelace from the Maurer School of Law and Eileen Braman from Political Science Department.  We encourage community members to send suggestions for questions to ask our guests to our Interchange email address: interchange@gmail.com.  PACE will also solicit questions from IU students.

The Porch Swing – Episode 109: September 13, 2013

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Steve Volan: The First Internet Date
As the Internet begins to spread its web, a young college student takes advantage of one of its foundational uses.Elizabeth Newton: Lessons Learned
A scary misadveture during semester in Brazil teaches an overconfident student that sometimes host mom knows best.

Citizens show support for 8th Street’s historic homes

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This week the Bloomington City Council heard from residents who are unhappy with plans to demolish six historic houses on West 8th Street to make way for a fraternity house. The council doesn’t hold power to regulate the properties, which are owned by Indiana University. But Council member Steve Volan said he was glad to see the group of concerned citizens. IU announced its plans to demolish the historic houses and sell the vacant lot to the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

“I’m really angry at the Fiji house – and this is really about power and money” said

Sandy Cole, who lives about two blocks from the proposed fraternity house. Speakers also took aim at IU for agreeing to the deal. Because of IU’s status as a state institution, it is not subject to the same city ordinances that could make it difficult for the fraternity to demolish the houses on its own. Melissa Cox-Ash said the houses are important elements of a well-preserved historic district.

Although the city government is not involved in the deal, speaker Micol Siegel said the demolition of historic houses fits with other recent developments in the city. She said Bloomington is increasingly catering to affluent students. The Bloomington Historic Preservation Commission has written a letter to IU in opposition to the project, but so far the university has said it plans to move forward with the sale.

Hola Bloomington – September 13, 2013

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Hostess Maria Auxiliadora  Viloria y Carlos Bakota, interview Lillian Casillas director of LA CASA Latino Cultural Center IU and celebrating their 40th Anniversary. Also Luis vs Luis, Heydi Encarnacion with her health segment. Information about the NHHM (National Hispanic Heritage Month) and the events of the week.

Plan Commission rejects move for Taste of India

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The Bloomington Plan Commission rejected a plan Monday to relocate the Taste of India restaurant to a building on East 3rd Street. The project included constructing a new building that would house the restaurant and five apartments. But nearby residents and property owners voiced concern about a lack of parking in the area, which is on the southern edge of the downtown business district.

The commission considered the proposal at a meeting in August, but it delayed a decision partly because of the lack of parking spots. Member Pat Williams said the plans didn’t change enough in the month between meetings.

The project was rejected by a vote of seven to two. The commission also voted to allow the business to reconsider its proposal, and return in as little as thirty days.

 

Indiana’s representatives weigh in on military action in Syria

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Senator Dan Coats, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, released a statement this week announcing his disagreement with the authorization of a U.S. military strike against Syria. He wrote,  “I do not believe a targeted, limited military strike on Syria is in the direct national security interests of the United States. Therefore, I do not support a resolution authorizing the president to take military action in Syria. There is no doubt that the Assad regime used long-banned chemical weapons to murder its own people. This horrific act demands a worldwide response of condemnation. However, the president has not justified his request to engage the United States militarily in Syria.” Coats was interviewed by Wolf Blitzer on CNN and elaborated on his stance there. Senator Joe Donnelly’s office confirmed that he has not taken a stance on the issue yet. Representative Todd Young said in a statement that,  “After listening to the speech, I have not been persuaded to support military action in Syria” and went on to say that he is waiting for more detailed information.

Books Unbound – A Study in Scarlet, Part 3

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In this episode:
“A Study in Scarlet” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

About this Author:
Born on 22 May 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Arthur Conan Doyle went on to study medicine at Edinburgh University from 1876 to 1881, during which time he began writing short stories. His first published work was “The Mystery of Sasassa Valley,” which appeared in 1879. With the publication of A Study in Scarlet, Conan Doyle created the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson who would make him famous. He based the deductive reasoning that characterized Holmes on the techniques of Joseph Bell, one of his instructors in medical school. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died on 7 July 1930, far more famous as a writer than as a doctor.

About this book:
Originally titled “A Tangled Skein.” A Study in Scarlet first appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual (1887), and was published as a book in July, 1888. Twenty-seven year-old Conan Doyle received £25 for full rights to the story, which he had written in three weeks in 1886. The work, the first of only four full-length Sherlock Holmes novels, introduced the consulting detective and the faithful Dr. Watson, who also chronicled their adventures in fifty-six short stories to make the Baker Street team the most famous pair in detective fiction. Although it attracted little notice at the time, it’s portrayal of Mormonism soon became controversial.

About this program:
Books burn; ideas endure. Books Unbound is a weekly showcase of literary works banned by those who fear the power of the pen. The program promotes literary reading and curiosity, challenging listeners to consider viewpoints that may be different from our own. Each week we bring you literature prohibited by governments, schools, and religious institutions. In the words of French philosopher Emile-Auguste Chartier, “nothing is as dangerous as an idea, when it’s the only one you’ve got.” Books Unbound is a production of community radio WFHB in Bloomington, Indiana.

Daily Local News – September 13, 2013

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Senator Dan Coats, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, released a statement this week announcing his disagreement with the authorization of a U.S. military strike against Syria; The Bloomington Plan Commission rejected a plan Monday to relocate the Taste of India restaurant; This week the Bloomington City Council heard from residents who are unhappy with plans to demolish six historic houses on West 8th Street to make way for a fraternity house; The playground at Bloomington’s Winslow Woods Park, on South Highland Avenue, will be closed until September 19th and is slated to reopen the next day.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Alycin Bektesh, Roscoe
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Volunteer Connection is produced in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our Engineer is Harrison Wagner,
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

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