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Daily Local News – February 3, 2014

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The national weather service office has released data that places the mean average temperature for January at 23.1 degrees, as recorded at its Bloomington station; As many as four hundred thousand Hoosiers will not be getting new Medicaid health care coverage, despite efforts from State Senator Karen Tallian to expand the program; Purdue University has created an online series to show how some rural communities are striving to improve their quality of life.

FEATURE
“Bamboozled: “Prospect Hill and McDoel Gardens Neighborhoods Caught In Legal, Political Dilemma

Last year an attorney for the city of Bloomington discovered what she called a problematic piece of city code, a law she said was itself illegal. The clause was in the city’s rules governing historic districts, and within a few months the City Council corrected the glitch. There was relatively little debate at the time, but in the months since the correction it’s become clear that the change could have long-term effects on property rights, particularly in two city neighborhoods. WFHB looked into the history of the error and how it led residents to spend years organizing, campaigning, and voting for ways to protect their neighborhoods–ways that, according to the city, never technically existed. Assistant News Director Joe Crawford brings us that story, including ongoing questions about how the city has dealt with the issue, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

ACTIVATE
Our weekly segment spotlighting people working for positive change in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Ally Tsimekles; Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Ally Tsimekles. Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford.Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker,
Our engineer today is Chris Martin,
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Residents Resist the Keystone XL Pipeline

Locals joined demonstrators nationwide to protest the Keystone XL pipeline. Participants held signs and listened as speakers led by Jack Brubaker warned of climate change and other environmental hazards of the tar sands process for extracting oil. The Bloomington Pledge of Resistance group  that is spearheading action in protest of the pipeline has a Facebook group at Bloomington no kxl. You can hear the full report Tuesday, February 4th on the Daily Local News at 5:30pm. 

Bring It On! – February 3, 2014

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William Hosea welcomes guest Richard Coleman, director of the Center for Career and Employer Relations at Vincennes University.

PART ONE
From the pages of Diverse Issues in Higher Education we read that, “There is significant emphasis placed on the retention and success rate in community colleges among African-American and Hispanic males. Many are experiencing great problems in our society and within the social structure.”

Many African-American and Hispanic males experience academic distress in colleges and have frequently been described in research studies as: (a) being from a low social academic background; (b) being a minimal academic achiever; and (c) possessing a general low self-concept.

Major research efforts have identified a number of factors that tend to impact minority males’ decision to drop or even stop-out of colleges. To explore this further, we have invited Richard Coleman, director of the Center for Career and Employer Relations at Vincennes University, to join us to discuss his pending doctoral research into these alarming patterns titled : Resilience in African American Male College Students.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Brown County Hour – Episode 23

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The Brown County Hour comes to you from the legendary Hills o’ Brown where the plum purple haze, the one nature herself drapes in the hills and hollers, inspires local characters, artists, and nature lovers.  It’s as though the hills themselves conspired to create a beauty and a culture in the heart of Indiana.  Sit for a spell and hear the music, the tall tales, the true stories, and the current goin’s on brought to you by folks who still know how to sit by a fire in winter and swim buck naked in summer…
In this episode of the Brown County Hour:
Vera Grubbs interviews Artist Michele Pollock of Lost Lake Studio
Charlie Cole continues his commentary on Yellowwood logging
Dave Seastrom – essay on Groundhog Day
Bill Land – Land and Lore of Brown County
Poems by Chris Curtain, Rick Fettig, Gunther Flumm and Tramp Star
Top ten reasons to visit Brown County by Rick Fettig
and our musical guest, fifth-generation Brown County singer/songwriter, Robbie Bowden.

Also please visit our main show page at www.browncountyhour.com

Hola Bloomington – January 31, 2014

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Hostess Prisma Lopez-Marin  and Cristy Padilla interview Jose Toledo about his new documentary titled “Unfreedom” and talk about the immigrant Latinos in a mid-western town. Also the EcoReport, the local news and the events of the week.

Volunteer Connection – January 31, 2014

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

IU Researchers Receive Grant to Prove Advantages of Data Mining for Healthcare

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Artificial intelligence in hospitals working with doctors to prescribe treatment sounds like something straight out of the movies. Researchers at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University are working to make this a reality.

The process, which uses data mining and a method called machine learning, could lead the way to a cheaper, better healthcare system. The research being done now is a collaboration of separate research started in 2010. Assistant Professor at IU Kris Hauser is one of the Principal Investigators.

“This was started a few years ago by one of my students who is now a part of this project and he had access to some good data with Centerstone research,” Hauser says, “We got together in my artificial intelligence class and we designed a system to try to recommend when and how much to treat people with mental health disorders. This new project is an attempt to expand that into new clinical domains. That includes cardiology, E.R. readmissions, and to improve the existing application.”

Hauser received his PhD. In Computer Science at Stanford University and won the CAREER award last year from the National Science Foundation.

The research centers mostly around a mathematical framework that can mine existing data to detect patterns. What this means for healthcare is that computers could access a patients complete medical records and suggest a treatment plan that wouldn’t conflict with any past conditions.

One of the obstacles in getting this framework to be effective is the lack of uniformity in hospitals nationwide with their electronic record keeping. Hauser says that until the historical quirks get worked out, they have to work very closely with their data providers to be able to use the data. Once it becomes easier to access the data, the machine learning framework will be able to access more and more data to make more complex treatment plans.

“You can’t really see a pattern unless you have enough data,” Hauser says, “So that’s what the A.I. is trying to do, look at patterns in the data to try and predict how new patients will behave. The more data you get, the more of a complete picture you get of a new patient. While every person is, to some extent, unique, there are some patterns as well in how your disease is progressing and how you might respond to a treatment. The more people we have like you as a patient, the better our predictions will be.

The other Principal Investigator of the research, Sriraam Natarajan, has worked closely with data in the fields of artificial intelligence and its application to bio-medical problems. He explains how this data mining and learning is something we see in our daily lives and that it could easily be harnessed to use in healthcare.

“I think that many people do not clearly see the impact data can have on their day-to-day lives,” Natarajan says, “Of course they see it when Google uses their data to better provide a service, like giving better search results for a movie to watch or a product to buy. I feel that the impact could be similar in terms of healthcare where data can aid in improving the quality of life and treatments, and hopefully lower the costs.”

The goal of the research is not to replace doctors but rather help them in their decision-making. Hauser says the reason this would be so helpful is because doctors don’t always have the time to look at all the data a computer could. In this instance, time is certainly money and Hauser says this research would not only improve the quality of healthcare but also bring down the cost for the patient.

“Our medical system is filled with billions and billions of dollars of wasted opportunities for treating people in a cost-effective way,” Hauser says, “Doctors over-prescribe medicines, they over-prescribe treatments, and they may not be doing the most effect treatments because they may have missed something about a person’s medical history. The information here is to let the doctor make the most informed choice. Doctors already don’t have a lot of time to spend with a patient and the medical history. This has the opportunity to digest the information for them and present it in a user-friendly way, then we have to see a better outcome.”

The research just received a $686,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The grant will help the researchers work towards trying out the intelligent computer frameworks on real patients in a real hospital setting.

“This provides the opportunity to save money, even in a single-disease scenario,” Hauser says, “Clinical depression, for example, is a multi-billion dollar industry. If we even save one percent of costs, this is paying back the investment many, many times over.”

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 12

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Daily Local News – January 31st, 2014

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The Monroe County Community School Board heard almost an hour of testimony on Tuesday, from a parents concerned about Fairview Elementary School; Tree clearing for the construction of Interstate 69 section five will begin this week, weather permitting; The Indiana Department of Environmental Management, or IDEM, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are looking for public opinion and comment on a new plan being proposed by Bedford Recycling, Inc; Governor Mike Pence commended the Indiana House of Representatives for advancing House Bill 1004 to the Indiana Senate; To celebrate Black History Month in February, Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus will host a variety of events on campus.

FEATURE
Collaborative researchers at Indiana University have received a six hundred and eighty-six thousand dollar grant from the National Science Foundation, to try to prove that data mining and artificial intelligence could make a doctor’s job easier and faster.

CREDITS
Today’s headlines were written by Lindsey Wright, Chelsea Hardy, and Daion Morton,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh with correspondent Casey Kuhn.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer today is Nick Tumino,
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Westville Correctional Facility Hunger Strike

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Last week, prisoners at the Westville Correctional Facility in Westville, Indiana staged a hunger strike and mass-call, in response to the transition last Fall from hot lunches to cold sack lunches. The mass-call succeeded in alerting prison officials to the prisoners’ dissatisfaction, and the facility has now switched back to hot lunches. Now, family members of Westville prisoners are claiming that the heat has been turned off in sections of the prison housing prisoners who participated in the strike. WFHB correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Westville Public Information Officer John Schrader about what he knows, and with an organizer from the group Indiana Prisoner Solidarity who chose the pseudonym Jesse Smith, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

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