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In-depth interviews and conversations
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Interchange – Curating Culture: Museums and Meaning

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Tonight on Interchange host Doug Storm is joined by Jason Baird Jackson, Director of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures at Indiana University and Eric Sandweiss a professor in the Department of History at Indiana University to try to answer the question “What are museums for?” by examining the ways these institutions work to create and define the culture they are said to represent. The program also looks at the way a museum works by leaving space for personal self-discovery while also undermining common stereotypes and common ideologies. The museum, not just a book on a wall.

Interchange – Below Zero and Homeless

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Host Alycin Bektesh speaks with Police Chief Mike Diekoff, Forest Gilmore of the Shalom Center and Elaine Guinn of New Hope Family Shelter about options for warm shelter in Bloomington.

Interchange – Saving Place: Passion, Politics and Sustainability in Historic Preservation

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This week on Interchange, Saving Place: Passion, Politics and Sustainability in Historic Preservation. Host Trish Kerle’ speaks with Bloomington city council member and small business owner, Chris Sturbaum, and Duncan Campbell, historic preservation consultant, retired associate professor of Architecture and director of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at Ball State University about current preservation challenges in Bloomington. Also discussed are issues of conservation and sustainability such as “greening” the built environmental (“the greenest home is the one that’s already been built”).

Interchange – Utopia: Ideas into Action

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In this episode of Interchange, host Doug Storm goes in search of No Place, or what Thomas More, the 16th century lawyer and statesman, and originator of the term (if not the literary genre), called Utopia. Providing map and compass (moral and otherwise) are Constance Furey, associate professor in the department of Religious Studies and a scholar of the Renaissance and Reformation Christianity, and Shelby Everett, a junior at Indiana University working towards a degree in Religious Studies who is currently interning with Fair Trade Bloomington.

Interview highlight: Constance Furey on utopian thinking as “educating desire”

“Though it’s often talked about as a kind of blueprint, and that’s one of the reasons that Plato’s Republic is invoked as a precedent also for a seemingly totalitarian vision of society, I think it’s actually helpful to imagine utopia more as a way of thinking about how to educate desire….Those desires are not in fact consistent or uniform across cultures, across time, between people, and so there’s a sense that what we do is going to be shaped by what it is we think we want and that’s where the ideal comes in and I think utopia is one of these ways of saying, and confronting us, ‘What do you want? What looks good to you?’…and therefore the implicit question potentially becomes explicit, ‘Why does that look good to you?’ And that’s a way of shaping or influencing desire…”

Works and authors discussed in this podcast:

Thomas More (1478 – 6 July 1535), Utopia

Plato, The Republic

Christine de Pizan (1364 – c. 1430), The Book of the City of Ladies

Emilia Laneir (1569-1645), Salve Deus Rex Iudæorum(containing “Eve’s Apology”)

Nathan Schneider, Thank You, Anarchy

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860 – 1935): “Yellow Wallpaper”; Herland

Interchange – Martin Spechler and Bill Mullen: On the Boycott of Israeli Universities

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Indiana University Economics Professor Martin Spechler and Purdue University American Studies Professor Bill Mullen debate the recent boycott of Israeli universities by the American Studies Association. Mullen is one of eight Indiana professors who signed an editorial supporting the boycott. Spechler has publicly stated his opposition to the boycott in a letter to the editor published in the Herald-Times. Spechler and Mullen discuss the use of boycott as a tool, the implications of an academic organization taking a political stand, and what the issue means for academic freedom. WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford moderates the conversation.

Interchange – The Occupy Movement: Origins, Practice, Legacy

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Tonight on Interchange host Doug Storm talks with three faculty members of Indiana University who were active in Occupy Bloomington, one of many occupations of public spaces in US cities that appeared as a response to the Occupy Wall Street Movement that originated in New York City in September of 2011.

Ben Robinson, associate professor of Germanic Studies.

Micol Seigel, associate professor in the American Studies and History Departments and co-founder of Decarcerate Monroe County.

Joe Varga, assistant professor of labor studies and an organizer in the all-volunteer chapter of South Central Indiana Jobs with Justice.

We look at out how Occupy began back in September of 2011 and attempted to define some of the issues surrounding Occupy Wall Street, and we’ve looked at how Occupy Bloomington was born. We also examine the Legacy of OWS-what did OWS encourage, what effects, if any, both positive and negative have come out of this popular protest movement.

Photo courtesy of Joe Varga

Interchange – Aging in a Modern Age

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This week on Interchange, host Alycin Bektesh speaks with Mela Hatchett and Mary Boutain of the Area 10 Agency on Aging about the changing perceptions and stigmas associated with aging.

Interchange – Big Data Is Watching You

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This week on Interchange host Doug Storm presents “Big Data Is Watching You,” a conversation with Colin Allen, Director of the Cognitive Science Program at Indiana University.  Allen is a philosopher of biology and cognitive science and he’s joined us once before on Interchange to talk about the possibilities of machine morality and perhaps rather the necessity of building morality into source codes.  If nothing else, this week’s program should make that at least clear, and clearly an imperative.  Of course we’re stuck with the question, who will craft this ethical code?

We also present here for podcast the unedited conversation which covers more ground and even attempts to explicate Yeats’s “Second Coming” (1919) as an ode to the coming of the Mind of Big Data.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

Of Related Interest:

 

Interchange – The Wages of Labor: Bloomington’s Industrial Past

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This week on Interchange, host Trish Kerle speaks with Carrol Krause, author of Showers Brothers Furniture Co: The Shared Fortunes of a Family, a City, and a University and Joe Varga, Assistant Professor of Labor Studies at Indiana University and a labor and social justice activist.

Since the 1870s, Bloomington has been shaped by the ebb and flow of industrialization – and de-industrialization, beginning with the Showers Brothers Furniture Company, followed by the RCA radio and television factory, right up to today with what appears to be – the fading presence of General Electric. Krause and Varga talk about the history of those companies, their impact on the city, and the rise of organized labor in Bloomington.

Interchange – Fred Cate: Government Surveillance, Then and Now

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This week on Interchange, host Joe Crawford speaks with Indiana University Law Professor Fred Cate, an expert on privacy and “cybersecurity”. Cate talks about government surveillance on the local, state and national levels – from the spying apparatus at the National Security Agency, to cell phone intercepts by the Indiana State Police, to new surveillance cameras in downtown Bloomington. Cate talks about how our understanding of privacy has changed since the adoption of the Fourth Amendment, which was intended to protect Americans from unlawful search and seizure, in 1792.

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