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Interchange – Subverting Democracy Through Education Reform

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Host Doug Storm is joined by prominent blogger and Purdue PhD candidate Freddie DeBoer. DeBoer’s blog, Interfaces of the Word, is often linked to and excerpted by such national bloggers and columnists like Andrew Sullivan at The Daily Dish and Ta-Nehisi Coates at The Atlantic Monthly. His essays have appeared in New Inquiry, Salon, and Jacobin.

DeBoer is currently writing a dissertation, on the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) and its successor, the CLA+, developed by the Council for Aid to Education.

We look at  issues in the politics and economics of our education system tonight with a fair amount of focus on Bill Gates whose Foundation has been said to have enacted an educational coup with the recent overwhelming acceptance of Common Core State Standards. And, due to the way most education policy is implemented in the states, there didn’t even need to be any public discussion or consent.

Big Philanthropy in Education is as much a subversion of the democratic process as the  McCutcheon decision by the Supreme Court to uncap the number of candidates to which an individual can give money.

 

Interchange – Courting the 1%: The Roberts Court and Money

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Host Doug Storm talks with Steve Sanders an associate professor in the Maurer School of Law at Indiana University. Sanders teaches in the areas of constitutional and public law while his current scholarship focuses on issues affecting same-sex couples and their families at the intersection of constitutional law, conflict of laws, federalism, and family law.

We spend the hour talking about recent Supreme Court decisions made by The Roberts Court. As the court is now decidedly split to favor money and power–routinely protecting institutional and financial power over the individual citizen–it seems to be working with an agenda in mind.

The Supreme Court of the United States is clearly a political and ideological institution and in our oligarchical moment of history, it is working in overdrive to support the designs of the 1% among us. Perhaps you’ll doubt my framing of the situation, but the record is clear as to the ideological bias of the court, and it’s moved further right since the appointments of Richard Nixon. In fact the justice often referred to as the “swing” vote on the Court, that one vote that clubs with either the 4 on the right or the 4 on the left, is the conservative Anthony Kennedy, a Reagan appointee.

Cases discussed:

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission

Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action

Interchange – Public Education: Dividing the Conquered

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Tonight we try to think about the way Public Education is politicized and the way that the politics of education as a system of social management has made secondary considerations of learning as a path to human flourishing. Unless of course you consider workforce training the path to a realization of your human potential. We raise the issue of our public education system as fulfilling a kind of economic function as well. Where else will Pearson Education sell their wares? Where else will Bill Gates dump all his technology products? The host is Doug Storm.

Joining us for this conversation are:

Cathy Fuentes-Rowher, Chair of the Monroe County/South Central Indiana branch of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education–a grassroots group of people who believe that fully funded and equitable public schools are essential for a healthy democracy.

Cathy Diersing, the School Leader of The Bloomington Project School: a Charter school.

Steve “Roc” Boncheck, a founder and Director of the Harmony School here in Bloomington. Harmony is an Independent school.

Interchange – Reading Moby Dick: Melville’s Wicked Book

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Host Doug Storm is joined by three professors of literature at Indiana University, Jennifer Fleissner, Jonathan Elmer, and Christoph Irmscher, to examine Herman Melville’s great book, Moby Dick. Each of these readers and teachers share a favorite passage from the novel and try to say just what makes them respond with awe to this novel.

Jennifer Fleissner reads Chapter 25, “Postcript.”
Jonathan Elmer reads the famous “Hotel de Cluny” passage from Chapter 41, “Moby Dick.”
Christoph Irmscher examines Chapter 87, “The Grand Armada.”

Deep calls unto deep. That is the whale song of Herman Melville who wrote to Nathaniel Hawthorne in response to the enthusiasm this friend and fellow traveller showed for his novel.

A sense of unspeakable security is in me this moment, on account of your having understood the book. I have written a wicked book, and feel spotless as the lamb. Ineffable socialities are in me. I would sit down and dine with you and all the gods in old Rome’s Pantheon. It is a strange feeling — no hopefulness is in it, no despair. Content — that is it; and irresponsibility; but without licentious inclination. I speak now of my profoundest sense of being, not of an incidental feeling. (Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne, November [17?] 1851)

Interchange – Voices On the Hill

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For our program tonight, Voices on the Hill, Interchange producers Doug Storm and Trish Kerlé wend their way through Rose Hill Cemetery accompanied by Voces Novae, a local chamber choir under the artistic direction of Sue Swaney.

On May 17th Voces Novae gathered at the gates of Rose Hill Cemetery to begin what they termed a “musical walking tour” of the cemetery. The group, along with an audience which seemed to grow in number as they moved from stone to stone, walked to a designated gravesite and then Sue Swaney would speak a bit about the person buried there and then a song would be sung in tribute to that person (and “in tune” with that person’s biography or achievements).

But we’re going to plant the songs sung by Voces Novae like peonies around the gravestones.

This is the story of Rose Hill told by 3 people who have different relationships with the Cemetery. Together their stories will offer some new perspectives on a 200-year-old outdoor museum in Bloomington that, up until now, may have been all but invisible to citizens.

Also performing in the cemetery were Cindy Kallet and Grey Larsen, local folk musicians who released a much acclaimed album in 2007 titled Cross the Water.

We bring you this Interchange in two parts. In our first segment we’ll hear from the most powerful man in Bloomington, Jay Davidson, Sexton of the Rose Hill Cemetery and self-styled King of the Dead and in the second we’ll meet two keepers of the dead, Sally Gaskill and Lou Malcomb, both of whom work to keep what was lost found.

Of related interest:

Voces Novae

Cindy Kallet & Grey Larsen

Interchange – Ernest Lockridge: The Nostalgia of Emptiness in Raintree County

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Photo Credit: Hugh Hazelrigg

Host Doug Storm ends our three-part series on Bloomington author Ross Lockridge, Jr. and his bestselling novel of 1948 with an interview with Ernest Lockridge, the oldest child of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

In the program Ernest Lockridge discusses his answers to the mystery of his father’s suicide elaborated in his book Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father Ross Lockridge, Jr. laying emphasis on what he calls “the culture of pedophilia” of the 1940s Bloomington made prominent by Alfred Kinsey.

Ernest’s brother, Larry Lockridge, strongly opposes this view and offers what he calls a “refutation” to Ernest’s allegations against their grandfather: “Larry Lockridge’s Response to Ernest Lockridge.”

Both brothers have prepared statements as coda to this series of radio programs which offer a kind of “last word” on the subject. Those statements made via email to Interchange Producer Doug Storm follow directly below.

More about Ernest Lockridge, his Skeleton Key to the Suicide, his novels, memoirs, and paintings can be found online here: Paintings of Ernest Lockridge.

The two previous shows in the series:

Interchange – Taking the Measure of Raintree County

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: In the Shade of the Raintree

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Larry Lockridge’s refutation of the allegations made by Ernest Lockridge in his book Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father, Ross Lockridge, Jr.

“It wasn’t the lack of evidence, it was the considerable counter-evidence I accumulated during my research for my biography of Ross Lockridge, Jr., Shade of the Raintree, that led me totally to reject my brother Ernest’s theory that childhood sexual abuse of Ross Junior by Ross Senior was the “skeleton key” to the tragedy. I have posted this counter-evidence, some eighteen items, on my brother Ross III’s website, www.raintreecounty.com under “The Biography.” The single piece of counter-evidence people find most convincing concerns an arrangement Ross Junior made with Ross Senior in January of 1947. Ernest was then eight years old and not taking well to the cold weather in Manistee, Michigan where our family was staying. Ross Junior arranged for Ernest to live in Bloomington at his father’s house for four months. The idea was that he would enroll in third grade at Elm Heights elementary school and Ross Senior would teach him recitation. Elsie Lockridge and occasionally Lillian Lockridge would also be in residence, but Ernest and his grandfather would be unsupervised in the large house. If Ross Junior knew that his father had sexually abused himself as a child, would he have put Ernest in such terrible jeopardy? The answer is so emphatically no that this single item is in itself sufficient to discredit Ernest’s entire theory; his key simply doesn’t fit. (With respect to his health, other arrangements could have been made: Ernest could have stayed, as Larry subsequently did, with his mother’s relatives, the Mumbys, within easier walking distance of Elm Heights.)

“I cannot disprove Ernest’s memories of fondling by his grandfather during sleepovers after the suicide of Ross Junior. None of the rest of us encountered such behavior in this grandfather we loved and respected, so these memories are truly shocking. Assuming some truth in them, I suspect Ross Senior’s behavior was yet another bitter consequence of the suicide itself, some totally inappropriate attempt at bonding with the surviving elder grandson by a depressed and guilty person—as parents of suicides usually are. This is an explanation, not an exculpation. It is also a possibility Ernest nowhere considers. It could explain the lack of continuity between Ross Senior’s behavior before the suicide, where I have proved beyond any doubt that there was no sexual abuse, and Ross Senior’s behavior after the suicide as Ernest has described it. Again, the “skeleton key’ Ernest insists on to explaining our father’s suicide doesn’t fit, whatever his own subsequent victimization.”

Larry Lockridge, May 14, 2014, via email to Doug Storm

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Ernest Lockridge Responds:

“Larry posits that grief might have caused a decent man, a Doctor Jekyll, to become a sexual monster, a Mister Hyde, and that this might explain Grandpa’s attack on me on the heels of my father’s suicide. By this logic, Bruce’s drowning years earlier might just as well have caused Grandpa to molest Shockley.

“There was no grief or love propelling the indignant, imperious Mister Hyde who attacked me violently. A predator who had invested so much precious time and energy prepping me was claiming his just reward.

“My sainted father would never have abandoned me to a deviant? Last time I looked this is the same father who abandoned his entire family, the lot of us, wife and four kids, without even acknowledging our existence.

“Embedded in SKELETON KEY TO THE SUICIDE OF MY FATHER is the covert culture of pervasive pedophilia, incest, and childhood sexual abuse, cocooned by institutional protection and denial, and permitted to persist, and to wreak unacknowledged havoc in the lives of innocents. Only now are we recognizing the role of denial and naiveté in perpetuating this plague on humanity. We are also just beginning to acknowledge and understand the leading role incestuous pedophilia plays in the tragedy of suicide.

“Larry’s “counter-evidence” counters nothing; rather, it unwittingly re-inscribes the menu of lethal canards that nourish the pedophile. My brother’s entire argument, the rotting foundation of “the biography,” is an epiphany of denial, a tedious mishmash of naiveté and questionable recall that fails to acknowledge the fiendish wiliness and persistence of the pedophile, and how families close ranks to appease and protect him even as he gluts himself at the family trough. “Grandpa would never have done a thing like that”; “Grandma would never have stood for it”; “but he never did anything to me”; “he’s too old, feeble, harmless” (whereas, pedophiles become “harmless” only after the coffin-lid is nailed down); “it’s a one-off thing”; “‘what we had together’ was unique, my being so special and all.”

“Even Custodians of the Family Honor have a minimal responsibility to bring themselves up to date. Rejecting SKELETON KEY rejects what at long last is becoming factually and irrefutably known regarding the domestic pedophile, his victim, and the deplorable propensity of other family-members to do literally anything to make it all just disappear.

Ernest Lockridge, May 15, 2014, via email to Doug Storm

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: An Unedited Interview

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Host Doug Storm talks with Larry Lockridge, author of Shade of the Raintree, about his father Ross Lockridge, Jr., and his bestselling novel of 1948, Raintree County, about the search for answers to the mystery of his father’s suicide, and about the wish to save his father’s letters and manuscripts for future scholars of the novel.

This is an unedited conversation.

Find out more about Larry Lockridge’s Shade of the Raintree at www.raintreecounty.com.

Photo credit: Hugh Hazelrigg

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: In the Shade of the Raintree

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Host Doug Storm continues the three-part series on the bestselling 1948 novel Raintree County with excerpts from a conversation with Larry Lockridge, the second child of Ross Lockridge, Jr., and author of Shade of the Raintree: The Life and Death of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

The episode opens with “Flash Perkins’ Theme” from the soundtrack to the 1957 movie Raintree County.

Listen to the first show in the series: Taking the Measure of Raintree County

More about the novel and Larry Lockridge’s biography can be found at www.raintreecounty.com.

Interchange – Taking the Measure of Raintree County

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Courtesy of the Estate of Ross F. Lockridge, Jr.

Courtesy of the Estate of Ross F. Lockridge, Jr.

Host Doug Storm introduces the three-part series Taking the Measure of Raintree County.

Perhaps it needn’t be said that Raintree County is novel with a history.  We take a first step tonight into the geography of the novel with the aid of three guests who will provide a kind of compass rose to help locate us in the mythical world of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

Guests:
Don Gray, emeritus professor of English literature at Indiana University; Eric Sandweiss, Carmony Chair, Department of History and Editor of Indiana Magazine of History; and Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts at The Lilly Library at Indiana University.

Interchange – A Passion to Preserve: Gay Men as Keepers of Culture

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Host Trish Kerle’ interviews author, Will Fellows, whose book, A Passion to Preserve: Gay Men as Keepers of Culture, documents an American social movement rendered nearly invisible by most historians. Fellows believes there’s ample evidence that gay men have long been extraordinary preservers of history and that this inherent interest is the result of a “psychologic androgyny” of masculine and feminine qualities. He discusses five patterns of behavior in gay men who are preservation-minded that he has identified: gender atypicality, domophilia, romanticism, aestheticism, and connection- and community-mindedness.  Fellows says, “we who begin our lives as boys, who are not like other boys, grow into men unlike other men.” 

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