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Interchange – The Hoarders: Pathologizing the Packrat

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We’re joined by Scott Herring, author of The Hoarders, a cultural history of the recent DSM-5 diagnosis of Hoarding Disorder. We talk about famous pack rats such as the Collyer Brothers of Harlem, Andy Warhol, and Big Edie and Little Edie Beale from the documentary Grey Gardens. Herring argues that this new disease has a significant–and overlooked–cultural back story from the 1930s to the present.

Also discussed: Ralph and Terry Kovel, authors of a nationally syndicated collectibles column that began in 1955; and Sandra Felton, “The Organizer Lady” and founder of “Messies Anonymous.”

Scott Herring is an associate professor in the Department of English at Indiana University.

The Hoarders: Material Deviance in Modern American Culture

Credits:
Producer & Host is Doug Storm.
Board Engineer is Jonathan Richardson.
Carissa Barrett coordinates our social media.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – Rape and White Male Privilege

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Jen Maher, Rasul Mowatt and Justin Garcia a second time to try to figure out how to talk about rape, sexual violence and sexual privilege, all of which seem cultural prerogatives for white males in the United States. The show focuses on “Affirmative Consent” laws and the responsibility of the institutions which “look the other” way or actively promote binge alcohol consumption.

Guests:
Jen Maher, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Gender Studies at Indiana University.
Justin Garcia, Director of Education & Research Training at The Kinsey Institute and Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Indiana University.
Rasul Mowatt, Associate Professor in the School of Public Health.

Credits:
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Breaking the Rulers: The Neoliberal University

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One tends to get easily bogged down and confused by the jargon used to describe particular powerful factions in our mislabeled Democracy and it’s hard not to think this is intentional on the part of pundits and policy wonks at billionaire-funded think-tanks. In this episode we try to make clear what the term Neoliberal means and see how it can be applied to the world of the American University, and in the process hope to identify the way the University system has come to view the student as only an industrial widget–a consumer of edutainment–and a commodity in the “free market” calculus.

Guests:

Jon Simons, an Associate Professor of Communication and Culture at Indiana University Bloomington. His research is about cultural theory, the connection between popular culture and politics, and images of peace in the Israeli peace movement. He is a member of the newly formed Faculty Governance Caucus that successfully ran a slate for the last Bloomington Faculty Council elections.

David Fisher, a professor of mathematics at IUB. He works on geometry and dynamics and is particularly interested in objects with lots of symmetry. He is a member of the newly formed Faculty Governance Caucus that successfully ran a slate for the last Bloomington Faculty Council elections. In 2011, he organized a petition which played a role in reversing IU’s attempt to turn health insurance into a mode of monitoring employee health.

Cassidy Sugimoto, an Assistant Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University Bloomington. She studies and teaches in the areas of scholarly communication and scientometrics. Her most recent book compilations have looked at the historical criticism of scholarly metrics and have explored the proliferation of novel forms of tools for scholarly assessment. She has been active in shared governance at IUB since her arrival in 2010 and is currently serving as President-Elect of the Bloomington Faculty Council.

Of related interest:

Bloomington Faculty Council

The Bicentennial Strategic Plan for Indiana University, approved by the Board of Trustees at its December 2014 meeting, includes eight strategic priorities that will be addressed between now and IU’s bicentennial in 2020. The plan provides a roadmap for IU’s efforts to remain among the best public research universities.

Biography of IU President Michael A. McRobbie

IU Board of Trustees

Credits:
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Understanding the Role of the Local School Board

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School Boards seem to have arisen alongside public schooling in general. In 1826 Massachusetts formally established the system of school committees by requiring each town to elect a separate school committee to have “the general charge and superintendence” of all the public schools of the town. Over time, this model spread to the rest of the nation, insuring that local citizens would have a direct voice in the development and governance of their public schools.

But groups like ALEC (American Legislative Exchange Council) want to do away with the School Board; state legislatures across the country continue to take away the power of communities to educate their citizens requiring measures of success that do little to foster learning. How can a School Board fight back?

Guests:

Ray Golarz is a former Indiana teacher and superintendent and co-author of the 2012 book The Problem Isn’t Teachers; he has been recognized especially for his pioneering work in implementing site-based shared decision-making. During his career he has served as a middle and high school teacher, administrator at various levels including superintendent, and has taught at St. Joseph’s College, Purdue University Calumet, Indiana University Northwest, and City University in Seattle.

Jenny Robinson is a parent with two children attending MCCSC schools, and a board member of the Monroe County branch of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education (or ICPE Monroe County).

Credits:

Host and Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Making the Case Against Cages; Being Vulnerable to Arrest

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Segment One: Making the Case Against Cages. Prison abolitionist Micol Seigel, an associate professor in the departments of American Studies and History at Indiana University, discusses issues surrounding homelessness and incarceration in Bloomington and Monroe County.

The conversation focuses on the changes in the Indiana criminal sentencing codes that shift categories of crime, eliminates some offenses, changes the severity of penalties, and requires people convicted of crimes to serve a greater percentage of their sentence than previous rules. The impact of the rules is not yet clear, but some people in Monroe County worry that it will increase the burden on the County Jail.

While the sentencing guidelines are reported to have the effect of slowing the growth of the state’s prison population a December 2013 Associated Press Report states that the changes will actually have the opposite effect. According to Applied Research Services, Inc., the changes will increase the state’s prison population over the next 10 years due to the new law’s requirement that inmates serve at least 75 percent of their sentences. This will offset changes lawmakers made in reclassifying offenses and setting new sentencing ranges.

Segment Two: Being Vulnerable to Arrest. An interview with Bloomington Police Chief Mike Diekhoff conducted by WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford from November 18, 2013 to discuss the announcement by the city of Bloomington of extra police patrols to be assigned to the downtown area, as well as along the B-Line Trail, and the fact that surveillance cameras will be used more extensively. The Herald Times reported that the new measures were targeted at panhandling, public intoxication, and vandalism. Diekhoff asserts that the police do not target classes of people but rather people’s public behaviors.

Credits:

Producer & Host, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Impulse Under the Influence: Campus Rape Culture

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“Impulse Under the Influence” examines campus rape culture and how easy access to alcohol exacerbates the incidence of sexual abuse.

Guests:

Jen Maher, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Gender Studies, Maher’s area of expertise covers gender and popular culture; second and third wave feminism; gender and modern memoir, feminist history/theory, and the politics of reproduction.

Rasul Mowatt, an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health. His main research areas of interest are leisure behavior, social justice, cultural studies, and critical pedagogy.

Justin Garcia, Director of Education & Research Training at The Kinsey Institute and Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies.

Credits:

Host and Producer, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – Slapping Both Cheeks: Incarceration As A Barrier To Social Justice

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“Slapping Both Cheeks” will try to offer some insight into the facts of incarceration in our society and community and into the idea of social justice.

Does incarceration decrease crime, either through deterrence or incapacitation? How do the challenges of homelessness make people vulnerable to arrest and incarceration? And once jailed how reduced are the chances for future welfare?

Incarceration is a fact of our justice system; Is it a barrier to the notion of social justice?

Our guests are:
Christopher Abert a social worker here in Bloomington.
Isabella Bravo is a lawyer with the Monroe County Public Defender’s Office.
Erin Marshall is a member of Decarcerate Monroe County.
Jason Sorden is a recidivist felon, recently paroled from prison and experiencing homelessness.
Judah Schept is an Assistant Professor of Justice Studies at Eastern Kentucky University.

Incarceration is a fact that both utterly inundates our society while at the same time being somewhat invisible to what we might call the voting middle class. Something one imagines akin to the abattoirs of our meat industry–our jails are hidden by being located in economically depressed middle America–we are blind to the lives that are darkened inside them.

Which is to say, how do we countenance throwing away the lives of so many people behind the justification of criminal code violations that disproportionately punish those who live in poverty and the Black and Hispanic populations?

And it’s not like the jailed population are the only people affected–families are put under such strain and hardship that there is no conception of “the good life” or the chimera we call the American Dream. There is the truth of an American Nightmare–the Prison State America.

We’ll try to understand the ways in which our political culture of management bureaucracy sweeps folks under the rug as part of business as usual.

What are jails good for?
What does the term Social Justice mean?

Credits:
Host & Producer, Doug Storm
With Special Assistance from Micol Seigel
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Education: The Local Up Against the Global

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Host Doug Storm offers selections from two previous shows on the state of public education in Indiana and the nation.

Part I

The program begins with the first half of our October 1, 2013 program, “The State of Education in Indiana.

Our guests for the October 1, 2013 program were Vic Smith, Board President of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education; Phil Harris, the Executive Director of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology; and Gary Crow, a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

Our topics included the coercive economics of educational products corporations like Pearson Education, the funding of charter schools by foundations like the Lilly Endowment which have tremendous reach by placing employees in government to influence public policy, and the role the school used to play, ought to play, but no longer does, in developing a democratic citizen. Listen closely as the guests focus on how educating for democracy ought to be “non-partisan.”

Part II

This segment excerpts our June 24, 2014 program, “Subverting Democracy Through Education Reform.” We invited nationally known blogger and Purdue PhD student Freddie DeBoer to join us. DeBoer is writing a dissertation on the Collegiate Learning Assessment ( or CLA) and its successor, the CLA+, which was developed by the Council for Aid to Education

In that show we looked at issues in the politics and economics of our education system with a fair amount of focus on Bill Gates who seems to be the shadow secretary of the department of education (and a big shadow at that). We also discussed the manufacturing of the CRISIS Narrative to sell the desperate need for educational reform to “keep pace” with the world’s labor markets.

Our break music tonight was from Hoosier School Heist author Doug Martin’s song, “When I-Step Was a Famous Dance.

Of related interest:

Interchange – Doug Martin: Muckraking Education Politics

Credits:

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Brave New GMOs

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Tonight’s guest is long-time critic of genetically modified organisms and foods, Marti Crouch, a noted academic research scientist in plant molecular biology who turned her back on that career due to concerns about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture.

With and a new wave of genetically engineered crops (GMOs) about to be commercialized, the battle for hearts and minds is heating up. Are GMOs required to feed the burgeoning population and to save the planet, as the biotech industry claims, or are GMOs a toxic hindrance to true food security and environmental sustainability, as critics contend? Join our guest, long-time GMO critic Marti Crouch, as we explore the implications of Dow Chemical’s new corn and soybeans engineered to withstand the WWII-era weedkiller 2,4-D – approved by federal regulators just a few weeks ago; Monsanto’s new herbicide-resistant cotton and soybean, Arctic apples that don’t turn brown, eucalyptus trees that withstand freezing, golden rice designed to alleviate vitamin A deficiencies, and other brave new crops on our horizon.

Ralph Waldo Emerson writes in his great 1842 Essay Experience that “Nature hates calculators; her methods are saltatory and impulsive.”

Marti Crouch has written that “Genes have an ecology – a complex way of interacting with themselves and the environment – that can interfere with the linear logic of genetic engineering.”

Nature leaps and dances upon (and over and under and to the side of) the linear…

Guest Bio:

Martha Crouch, Ph.D., Science Consultant

Marti was a graduate student at Yale University studying the development of seeds and flowers when genes were first cloned in the 1970s.  By the time she headed her own plant molecular biology lab at Indiana University in the 1980s, plant genes were being patented. Prof. Crouch became concerned about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture and her own contributions, and as a result shut down her research lab in the 1990s and taught courses on the intersections of technology, food and agriculture, with an emphasis on environmental impacts. In 2001, Marti left Indiana University, and now pursues independent scholarship and consulting.  Her background thus spans the whole history of genetic engineering in agriculture, as both a participant and a critic, giving Marti a valuable set of skills and perspectives for her work on impacts of recent technologies for non-profits such as the Center for Food Safety.  Marti is also the official wild mushroom inspector at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Part II of To Cull Is to Kill

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Host Doug Storm welcomes guests Alyce Miller, Dave Rollo, Sandra Shapshay, and Lisa Sideris for Part II of our discussion about the Griffy Lake Nature Preserve deer cull scheduled to begin in November and last through the end of February.

There is great contention between groups opposed to the violent intervention of a kill and those who feel the kill is necessary to protect biodiversity at Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

We try in the second half of the show to understand the “gift” in Genesis 1:28.

And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.(KJV)

The implicit question in both of our programs comes from Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring:

Who has decided—who has the right to decide—for the countless legions of people who were not consulted that the supreme value is a world without insects, even though it be also a sterile world ungraced by the curving wing of a bird in flight? The decision is that of the authoritarian temporarily entrusted with power; he has made it during a moment of inattention by millions to whom beauty and the ordered world of nature still have meaning that is deep and imperative.

For Questions or Comments please email us: interchange@wfhb.org.

Of related interest:

Two groups of note are mentioned in the program: The Humane Society of the United States and The Nature Conservancy. Here are the “SourceWatch” pages for both.

The Nature Conservancy
The Humane Society of the United States

Credits:
Host and Producer, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

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