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Interchange

In-depth interviews and conversations
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Interchange – Honey From a Weed: The Life of Patience Gray

As we’re in the midst of a holiday season that can so often feel like merely a smattering of one-off charitable acts and token expressions of fellow-feeling paired with culturally enforced gluttony, it seemed appropriate to turn to a different kind of life, one which defines fasting and feasting in much different terms. As the sweet gives to salt it’s …

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From the Vault: Louis Agassiz with Christoph Irmscher

Interchange took a break this week. As a substitute, here’s a conversation with Christoph Irmscher about Louis Agassiz for your edification and your listening pleasure. This first aired on June 8, 2013 as part of the summer series The Custom House. Louis Agassiz, born in 1807 in Fribourg, Switzerland, came to the US in 1846 and very quickly became one …

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Interchange – Censorship and Sensibility: Story and First Person Provocation

“Censorship and Sensibility” features local author and film scholar Joan Hawkins in conversation with writer Laurie Stone. Stone was in town to read from her latest book as part of the Player’s Pub Spoken Word series organized by the Writers Guild at Bloomington. A longtime writer for the Village Voice, theater critic for The Nation and critic-at-large on Fresh Air, …

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Interchange – Censorship and Sensibility: Extended Version

EXTENDED VERSION: “Censorship and Sensibility” features local author and film scholar Joan Hawkins in conversation with writer Laurie Stone. Stone was in town to read from her latest book as part of the Player’s Pub Spoken Word series organized by the Writers Guild at Bloomington. A longtime writer for the Village Voice, theater critic for The Nation and critic-at-large on Fresh …

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Interchange – Matilda and the Wobblies

From the Ukrainian Pale to Bridgeport, Connecticut. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Radicalized by deplorable labor conditions for immigrants in America, Matilda Rabinowitz became one of the only women to organize for the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Rabinowitz immigrated to the United States from Ukraine at the age of thirteen. …

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Interchange – Leon Trotsky, or The Revolution Betrayed

Our show today is another in our series on the Russian Revolution of 1917. This time our focus is on Leon Trotsky. Our music throughout is by the 80s English, socialist, skinhead, soul, punk group, The Redskins. We open with “Lev Bronstein.” The dream of socialism as an organizing principle has been deemed an inevitable failure — and logically undemocratic …

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Interchange – Understanding Stalin: The Russian Revolution (Part Two)

In the conclusion of Hiroaki Kuromiya’s 1991 short biography of Stalin, he tells us what might be all we need to know of Stalin’s worldview: first, Stalin underlined the following passage in Trotsky’s 1920 Terrorism and Communism, “If human life in general is sacred and inviolable, we must deny ourselves not only the use of terror, not only war, but …

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Interchange – The Past Is Uncertain: The Russian Revolution (Part One)

It’s October 24th 2017, nearly 100 years ago to the day in 1917*, Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov became Chairman of the Council of People’s Commisars in Russia. Ulanov is better known to us as Lenin. Michel Foucault said in 1977 that “It is the desirability of the revolution which causes a problem today.” Well, that today being 40 years ago, and …

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Interchange – Walking the Talk: The Revolutionary Abolitionist Benjamin Lay

Today, the curious case of Benjamin Lay: Englishman, Quaker, cobbler, sailor, cultural shock firebrand, cave dweller, autodidact, animal liberationist, and outspoken critic of the hypocrisy of slave-owning Quakers in 18th century Pennsylvania. He would become known as one of the last radicals of the English revolution — an uprising in the mid 17th century against royal power, and an early …

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Arts Interchange – Chekhov’s Three Sisters: Where There’s a Will…

Our opening song is surely well-known–this is “Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay” performed here by Elsa Lanchester, which Chebutykin, the doctor in Chekhov’s Three Sisters, periodically, perhaps pointedly, hums. Believe it or not, the lyrics from this 1891 minstrel farce variety show called Tuxedo do apply here. It may also be of interest that Henry Sayers, credited with the composition, claims not to …

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