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Interchange – Marriage Equality: From the Margins to the Mainstream

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Hosts Doug Storm and Trish Kerle’ explore some of the nuances, complexities and limitations of marriage for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community – the LGBT community – from a decidedly left of center – some might even say, radical – political and cultural perspective. This is not an anti-marriage or anti-marriage equality show. It is, however, our attempt to underscore that marriage may not be an obvious or clear-cut decision for all same-gender couples.

Since the overturning of the Defense of Marriage Act (otherwise known as DOMA or Windsor vs. the United States) in June 2013, there have been dozens of victories for the freedom to marry, with many of those rulings on hold pending appeal. As of today, 19 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have legalized marriage for lesbian and gay couples.

In Indiana, same-sex couples were getting legally married for three days in June 2014 (when the ban on marriage was overturned), until the state was granted a stay of that decision. Then, on August 26, 2014, cases from IN and WI were presented to a panel of three federal judges with the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. It’s uncertain when a ruling by that panel will be announced, but many legal experts expect the U.S. Supreme Court will settle the issue of marriage equality once and for all in the coming session.

Guests:

Byron Craig holds two degrees from Indiana University – a master’s degree in African American and African Diaspora Studies and a PhD in Communications and Culture. His research explores the intersections of race, gender and class and he is a faculty lecturer with the Kelley School of Business at IU.

Colin Johnson is Associate Professor of Gender Studies and Adjunct Associate Professor of American Studies, History and Human Biology at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he teaches courses on LGBT studies and the history of gender and sexuality in the United States.

Credits:

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Co-Host: Trish Kerle’
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Measured by Mistakes: The Reality and Representation of Policing

Tonight’s program seeks to shine a light first on what’s been called the “militarization” of police across the country due to something like a federal “give away” program where state and local forces are made the beneficiaries of excess military production (the “1033 Program”). We’ll also try to detach that reality from the “on the ground” aspects of being a police officer in a community. And finally, I’ll ask our guests to answer one question: Which should we want, officers of the law or officers of the peace?

Our guests are Monroe County Sheriff James Kennedy who has held that elected office since 2007, and Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Greg Jeffers whose research focuses on police-citizen interactions and resident’s perceptions of the police.

Of Related Interest:
Interchange – Policing Race in America: Ferguson, Missouri

Bring it On Guests Discuss NAACP Suggestions for Encounters with the Police

Bring It On! – August 18, 2014

Credits:
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson with assistance from Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Policing Race in America: Ferguson, Missouri

On tonight’s program, Policing Race in America, we discuss the way racial minorities are denigrated and devalued through institutional violence using the August 9 police murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri as an example that is all too common in the U.S.

Darren Wilson, the officer who killed Brown, is a resident of Crestwood, MO which is 94% White and under 2% Black, working in a Ferguson Police department (whose racial makeup is actually nearly that of the suburb of Crestwood) which polices a community that is 67% Black and 29% White (according to Wikipedia).

Joining host Doug Storm for this discussion are Jeannine Bell, an expert on police behavior and hate crime at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Valerie Grim, professor and chair of the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies.

Credits:
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Poor Bees, Poor Birds, Poor Men: Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring

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Tonight we  share with you a discussion of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring I had with two scholars of Carson’s work, Lisa Sideris, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and the Director of the Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society, and Christoph Irmscher, provost professor of English and the Director of the Wells Scholars program. Silent Spring was published in 1962 and was a document of the detrimental effects on the environment of the indiscriminate use of pesticides like DDT. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. These claims, to say the least, were explosive. We recorded this conversation as part of the 2013 summer series called The Custom House and included in it are selections from the text that are read to the accompaniment of music by Early Day Miners.

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In the coming weeks Interchange will seek to explore a few topics that have breadth and depth enough to require multiple treatments to be sure we cover as many angles and perspectives as we can in order to present a more complete picture. One such topic is Bloomington’s long history of being a toxic waste dump thanks to the Westinghouse Electrical Corporation (bought and sold several times since they dumped untold amounts of electrical equipment filled with polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, into Bloomington’s soil and groundwater). If you’re a dedicated listener you know that Interchange has tackled the topic in the past and you can go find those shows via our archives link at WFHB.org. How should we think about such a breach of care and responsibility? Can’t we consider that an extreme violation of the rights of those people living through that period of active contamination, but also can’t we see it is a violation against the future inhabitants most of whom, by now, either don’t know about the toxicity under our feet and in our water, or have assumed the problem has gone away. Instead, it festers.

Beyond PCBs we’ll take a look at Genetically Modified Organisms and Food Security as well as the Coal and Fracking industries. At the back of all of this is our right to know what is being done to us, to our bodies, to the world that sustains our lives, and to those new humans we bring into this land of toxic waste.

Interchange – Choctaw Academy: Educating the Vanquished

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Original Air Date: September 3, 2013: Choctaw Academy 

Host Doug Storm speaks with Christina Snyder, an associate professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at Indiana University. Snyder’s scholarship focuses on Native North America and on the histories of colonialism and slavery.  She is the author of Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America.  Snyder instructs us about Choctaw Academy, the first national Indian boarding school in the United States. Open from 1825 to 1848, the school was located on the plantation of prominent politician Richard Mentor Johnson. During Choctaw Academy’s lifespan, the United States transitioned from an east-coast nation to a continental power. The story of Choctaw Academy reveals how the emerging U.S. empire developed a tandem approach, violence and acculturation, to exert economic, political, and cultural influence far beyond even its extensive territory, and the complex ways in which colonized people met these challenges.

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: Mick Harrison and Bloomington’s Toxic Waste Problem

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This is the final show of our News Summit Special four-episode series “The Best of Andy Mahler.”

For tonight’s episode Mahler talks with Bloomington resident Mick Harrison, one of the nation’s foremost environmental and public interest attorneys representing whistleblowers, environmental advocates, and others who resist corporate and government malfeasance. The two pay special attention to how Westinghouse turned Bloomington into a toxic waste disaster area by dumping more than a million pounds of PCB-contaminated materials in and around Monroe County, and the decades-long efforts of Westinghouse (with EPA assistance) to avoid responsibility for cleaning it up.

Next week we’ll return to regular programming on Interchange when Doug Storm and Trish Kerle’ talk to composer and musician Lauren Bernofsky and author Scott Russell Sanders for a discussion on environmental awareness and the arts with a special focus on their current collaboration with The Cardinal Stage Company called The Breakfast Feast.

 

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: A Poet Protecting Mountaintops

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This episode features award-winning poet and author Maurice Manning, a native of Danville, Kentucky. Manning’s work has appeared in The Green Mountains Review, The Spoon River Poetry Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Sonora Review, and The New Yorker. His collection entitled “Lawrence Booth’s Book of Visions” was the 2001 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets competition. In the third segment of the interview Manning discusses his active efforts to put a stop to the coal industry’s destructive technique of “mountaintop removal” in his native Kentucky.

This is the third of four installments in our News Summit Special series “The Best of Andy Mahler” chosen from our deep archive of available podcasts. Mahler was a long-time host for Interchange who, in 2009, was presented with a WFHB Legacy Award for his service to the station. Mahler is active in Heartwood, a regional network founded in 1991 that protects forests and supports community activism in the Eastern United States through education, advocacy and citizen empowerment.

Maurice Manning

NEXT WEEK: PCBs in Bloomington.

The final installment in our WFHB News Summit “Best of Andy Mahler” series. Bloomington resident Mick Harrison, one of the nation’s foremost environmental and public interest attorneys, talks with Mahler about the PCB contamination left behind by Westinghouse and their decades-long efforts to avoid responsibility for cleaning it up.

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: Dwight Worker

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Tonight Interchange presents the second episode in our “Best of Andy Mahler” series.

Mahler’s guest in this program is Dwight Worker, long-time Bloomington resident, author, adventurer, and activist. Worker talks about his early years as an anti-war and civil rights activist at IU in the 60s, his escape from a Mexican prison in the 70s, his career in information systems in the 80s, his adventures as a drift-net sinker in the 90s, and his most recent career as a professor of information security at IU. This is one lively Interchange you won’t want to miss!

If you liked this interview and want to hear more with Andy Mahler just head to the archives! Here’s a shortcut: Andy Mahler on Interchange.

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: Annemarie Mahler

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During the month of  July our News Department programming will consist of a “Best Of ” series as we direct and attend our first ever WFHB News Summit.  Our “Best of Interchange” highlights programs by host Andy Mahler, the recipient of the 2009 WFHB Legacy Award. In the first of these programs Andy interviews his mother, the artist Annemarie Mahler.

Annemarie (Ettinger) Mahler was born in Vienna, Austria in April of 1926. She eventually wound up in Bloomington but spent time in a Dutch orphanage, New York City, Berkeley, Dallas, and Madison, Wisconsin (and many other places) along the way. At Berkeley, she met and married a young biochemist named Henry Mahler, also born in Vienna. Incredibly, they had gone to the same elementary school yet had never met. They had three children, one of whom asks her about her life, love, her art, and anything else you might ask your own mother about on a live call-in radio program.

So tune in to Interchange to hear voices from the past as we prepare for our future. You’ll hear four great shows from our past. There are hundreds more to choose from. Get thee to the Interchange Archives and set to downloading!

Future show guests are:

July 15: Dwight Worker

July 22: Maurice Manning

July 29: Mick Harrison

Interchange – The 2014 WFHB News Summit: A Discussion with Alycin Bektesh

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Host Doug Storm asks WFHB News Director, Alycin Bektesh, questions about the upcoming WFHB News Summit.

Anyone with an interest in the current status of the News Department, the future of particular shows, or a desire to learn more radio skills is invited. You do not have to be a current volunteer in the News Department to attend any of the sessions.  The first week of sessions, July 7th – July 11th will be geared toward information sessions on current procedures and practices, as well as program staff/listener meet and greets.

The Summit takes place July 7th through August 1st, Monday through Friday, 11am  – 12pm. Sessions range from 45 minutes to 90 minutes and fall into one of three tracks: Big Ideas, Individual Programing, & Training. The same sessions are held at the same time each week, and each week takes on a different focus. Week one: Introductions,  Week Two: Brainstorming, Week Three: Action Plan, Week Four: Implementation.

A quick overview of the whole month’s schedule is available here: 2014 Summit Schedule.

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