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Interchange – Bloomington City Council Primary Candidates: District 1 Democrats

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Host Doug Storm is joined by District 1 candidates for the Democratic nomination to run for the Bloomington City Council seat in November.

Guests
Chris Sturbaum (incumbent)
Kevin Easton

Previous Candidate Conversations
Interchange – Bloomington City Council Primary Candidates: District 4 Democrats
Interchange – Bloomington City Council Primary Candidates: District 3 Democrats

Related
Democracy for Monroe County Forum, 3/31

Music:
“Election Day” – The Replacements
“Election Day” – Arcadia

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Bloomington City Council Primary Candidates: District 4 Democrats

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Host Doug Storm welcomes the candidates vying for the Democratic party nomination to run for the District 4 Bloomington City Council seat: Dave Rollo, the incumbent, and the challenger, Philippa Guthrie.

Music
“The Candidate” by Urge Overkill
“The Politics Of Dancing” by Re-flex

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Saint Monkey: A Conversation with Jacinda Townsend

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Jacinda Townsend, author of the novel Saint Monkey which has won the 2015 James Fenimore Cooper Prize awarded by the Society of American Historians. The Society’s web site says that the “prize is awarded for a book of historical fiction on an American subject that makes a significant contribution to historical understanding, portrays authentically the people and events of the historical past, and displays skills in narrative construction and prose style.”

Of Related Interest
#WhiteHistoryMonth: The FBI’s obsession with African-American Literature

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Bloomington City Council Primary Candidates: District 3 Democrats

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This is a special Wednesday edition of Interchange. We kick-off a series of candidate conversations concerning contested seats on Bloomington’s City Council. There are four seats which have primary challenges to the incumbents–these are for Districts 1, 3, 4, and 5.

Tonight’s show welcomes the candidates vying for the democratic party nomination to run for the District 3 seat. We welcome Marty Spechler, the incumbent, and the two challengers, Allison Chopra, and Mike Satterfield.

The city’s website describes the role of the council this way:

As the legislative body of the City, the City Council is a link between the citizens of Bloomington and their government. By enacting legislation that fosters the health, safety and welfare of the City, the Council works to represent the interests of residents while ensuring the delivery of municipal services. By statute, the Council is responsible for the control of the City’s property and finances, and the appropriation of money.

It’s easy to lose sight of the big important issues like poverty and social justice amidst all the bureaucratic procedures and jargon of operational government, but this is our intent on the series.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Research Assistance: Nancy Jones
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Ukraine: 25 Years of Revolution

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Over the past year Americans have been hearing about the escalating conflict in Ukraine as a story of separatist movement stoked by Russian expansionism under Putin.

The human cost of the partisan war as of February 2015 is sobering. According to the UN, 5,700 people have been killed; 14,000 wounded. Meanwhile, 5.2 million Ukrainian people are living in conflict areas; and over 950,000 people have been displaced within Ukraine, while 600,000 have fled to neighboring countries, of whom 400,000 have gone to Russia.

All this is taking place in a country already suffering from a crisis in health and demographics. Between 1990 and 2013, Ukraine’s population declined by over 12 percent. The fertility rate is well below replacement rates, and the mortality rate among working-age and younger men is said to be at crisis levels. Income inequality is among the worst in the world and there is widespread environmental depredation, and a deteriorating infrastructure.

While the suffering in Ukraine is clear, a clear divide between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ forces there may not be. Most of us struggle to understand the ongoing conflict because our knowledge of Ukraine during the post-Soviet era is very incomplete. We are told by our leaders and by the mainstream press that the fight reflects a clear conflict between pro-Russian and pro-Western ideologies. We have very little idea of what it has been like to live in Ukraine during the past 25 years.

Guests
Sarah Drue Phillips, IU Professor of Anthropology and the Director of the Russian and East European Institute. She has been conducting anthropological research in Ukraine since 1995. Her broad research interests have concerned the variable effects of socialist collapse on people’s lives, especially in terms of gender formations, health, social inequalities and social justice, and changing citizen-state relations. She has studied the role of women in Ukraine’s civil society, the Ukrainian disability rights movement and, most recently, HIV prevention strategies.

Padraic Kenney, IU Professor of History and International Studies at Indiana University. He is the author or editor of seven books on Polish, Eastern European, and global history including most recently, 1989: Democratic Revolutions at the Cold War’s End (Boston, 2010).

Polina Vlasenko, a Ph.D. student in Anthropology at IU who is a native of the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv. She was an active volunteer in bringing medical aid to participants in the 2014 EuroMaidan protests, and has seen family members forced to flee from the eastern region of Ludansk.

Music
“Stand Up!” by Okean Elzy
“It’s My City” by ONUKA
“Carpathian Rap” by DakhaBrakha

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Research & Script: Nancy Jones
Board Engineer: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Making Love to Siri: The Seductiveness of Robots

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Tonight’s show “Making Love to Siri,” seeks to understand what is seductive to us about robots. Which question should we ask: Can we make love to Siri?, or, Can Siri make love to us?

Guests
Colin Allen is the Director of the Cognitive Science Program, Provost Professor in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, and Associate Editor of Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Selma Sabanovic is an Assistant Professor of Informatics at Indiana University, Bloomington, whose work combines the social studies of computing, focusing particularly on the design, use, and consequences of socially interactive and assistive robots in different social and cultural contexts, with research on human-robot interaction (HRI) and social robot design.

Related Interchange Programs
Interchange – Thinking About Thinking Machines
Interchange – Terror Skies: The Drone as Judge and Jury

Related Popular Articles
We Know How You Feel
How Robots & Algorithms Are Taking Over
Why we have to get smart about artificial intelligence
Bot or Not?
Ex Machina and sci-fi’s obsession with sexy female robots
Her: the movie every internet addict should be forced to watch

Music
“One Note Song” by Tenacious D
“The Robots” by Kraftwerk
“Human After All” by Daft Punk

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Forbearance and Fighting: Parsing Jihad and Martyrdom

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Asma Afsaruddin to discuss her book Striving in the Path of God: Jihad and Martyrdom in Islamic Thought.

In her essay “Inventing ‘Jihad‘,” Afsaruddin writes:

Privileging the legal literature above other kinds of literature—particularly the exegetical literature on the Qur’an and ethical treatises—in discussions of jihad almost inevitably leads to the conclusion that it is primarily a collective military obligation incumbent upon able-bodied Muslim men in the service of state and religion. And because what we call Islamic law is assumed to be derived directly from the Qur’an and the hadith (the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad), such an obligation is assumed to be mandated by Islam itself.

But if we put on our historical glasses a considerably different picture emerges. The earliest connotations of jihad had to do with patient forbearance in the face of harm and stoic, nonviolent resistance to wrongdoing….

Some were also of the opinion that the Qur’anic command to fight was only applicable to the first generation of Muslims who were contemporaries of Muhammad, known as the Companions, since the historical referent in the verses that deal with fighting are the hostile pagan Arabs of Mecca.

Such understandings, however, could and did prove inimical to the process of empire-building, and the need was soon felt in official and certain legal circles to promote the military jihad as a religiously meritorious activity. This is precisely what happened during the expansion of the Islamic empire after the death of Muhammad during the late seventh and eighth centuries of the Common Era….

This progressive watering-down in later exegetical and legal literature of the categorical Qur’anic prohibition against initiating hostilities is revealing of the triumph of political realism over scriptural fidelity.

Some scholars from the later period continued to dispute this cooptation of jihad in the service of Realpolitik. These scholars’ main area of contention was with the legal position which came to view lack of adherence to Islam, rather than aggression on the part of the adversary, as the casus belli for the military jihad, a position they regarded as unethical and morally impermissible.

Of Related Interest:
How Do We Talk About Islam After Charlie Hebdo?
Egypt and the Problem of Religion
Islam and Modernity: Issues for the Classroom (Podcast)

Guest:
Asma Afsaruddin is professor of Islamic Studies and chair of the Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures at Indiana University, Bloomington. She was named a Carnegie Scholar in 2005. Her previous books include The First Muslims: History and Memory (2008), and Excellence and Precedence: Medieval Islamic Discourse on Legitimate Leadership (2002) She was awarded the World Book Prize for the best new book in Islamic Studies given by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance of the Republic of Iran on February 8th in Tehran, Iran’s capital and largest city.

Credits:
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – A Measure of Choice: Vaccine Opposition and Public Health

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“A Measure of Choice” explores the reasons that some parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children. The so-called “anti-vax” movement has been lumped in with what many in the popular press are calling a “war on science.” Along with trying to understand what the reasons are for this position on vaccinations, we’ll also examine the ethical and social justice issues surrounding these parental decisions and how they affect the public health.

Guests
Jennifer Reich is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Colorado-Denver whose research examines how individuals and families make decisions about healthcare, welfare, and policy. She has authored an article to be published last September in the Journal Gender & Society titled “Neoliberal Mothering and Vaccine Refusal.”

Stuart Yoak is Executive Director of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics at Indiana University. APPE is an international, multidisciplinary association advancing ethical understanding and practice in the classroom, the workplace, and society.

Discussed in the program:
Neoliberal Mothering and Vaccine Refusal

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Production and Research: Nancy Jones
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Interchange – Primary Candidates for Mayor: A Conversation

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Host Doug Storm welcomes the primary candidates for Mayor of Bloomington.

Democrats: John Hamilton, John Linnemeier, Darryl Neher
Republican: John Turnbull

Some Topics Discussed: growth and development projects; job creation; minimum wage; tech sector; Party politics; IU Health’s decision to move the hospital out of downtown; city-wide broadband; political appointments.

The Primary Election is Tuesday, May 5th, 2015.

Interchange – The Prick of Noon: Romeo & Juliet

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We have two guests with us tonight to discuss the play both as production or performance and as text; the deed and the word. As Harold Goddard said, “Drama is a portrayal of human passions eventuating in acts. Poetry is a picture of life in its essence.” Shakespeare toils to mend the two.

In Act One, “The Play’s the Thing,” we’re joined by the director of the IU Theater Production of Romeo & Juliet, Nancy Lipschultz to talk about producing the play for the stage.

In Act Two, “The Prick of Noon,” we’re joined by Ellen MacKay, a scholar of early modern English drama and public culture whose approach to the Shakespearean stage is “driven by the epistemological problems that the theatre poses to a culture eager to draw a clear line between artifice and authenticity.” We discuss Shakespeare’s treatment of time.

We don’t need to withhold any plot points tonight as our subject is a play that was written sometime near the end of the 17th century and like all of Shakespeare’s plays is based on a prior text or two. It’s an ancient plot, warring tribes, political enmity in city-states, and even star-crossed lovers: all nothing new. We can even find Dante referencing historical Montagues and Capulets as feuding political parties in the Purgatory of his Divine Comedy.

And so you know, Romeo and Juliet are always dead before we even begin. It is the outcome that begs a reason why and the play begins with the Prologue giving up our ghosts.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

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