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Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: Mick Harrison and Bloomington’s Toxic Waste Problem

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This is the final show of our News Summit Special four-episode series “The Best of Andy Mahler.”

For tonight’s episode Mahler talks with Bloomington resident Mick Harrison, one of the nation’s foremost environmental and public interest attorneys representing whistleblowers, environmental advocates, and others who resist corporate and government malfeasance. The two pay special attention to how Westinghouse turned Bloomington into a toxic waste disaster area by dumping more than a million pounds of PCB-contaminated materials in and around Monroe County, and the decades-long efforts of Westinghouse (with EPA assistance) to avoid responsibility for cleaning it up.

Next week we’ll return to regular programming on Interchange when Doug Storm and Trish Kerle’ talk to composer and musician Lauren Bernofsky and author Scott Russell Sanders for a discussion on environmental awareness and the arts with a special focus on their current collaboration with The Cardinal Stage Company called The Breakfast Feast.

 

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: A Poet Protecting Mountaintops

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This episode features award-winning poet and author Maurice Manning, a native of Danville, Kentucky. Manning’s work has appeared in The Green Mountains Review, The Spoon River Poetry Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Sonora Review, and The New Yorker. His collection entitled “Lawrence Booth’s Book of Visions” was the 2001 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets competition. In the third segment of the interview Manning discusses his active efforts to put a stop to the coal industry’s destructive technique of “mountaintop removal” in his native Kentucky.

This is the third of four installments in our News Summit Special series “The Best of Andy Mahler” chosen from our deep archive of available podcasts. Mahler was a long-time host for Interchange who, in 2009, was presented with a WFHB Legacy Award for his service to the station. Mahler is active in Heartwood, a regional network founded in 1991 that protects forests and supports community activism in the Eastern United States through education, advocacy and citizen empowerment.

Maurice Manning

NEXT WEEK: PCBs in Bloomington.

The final installment in our WFHB News Summit “Best of Andy Mahler” series. Bloomington resident Mick Harrison, one of the nation’s foremost environmental and public interest attorneys, talks with Mahler about the PCB contamination left behind by Westinghouse and their decades-long efforts to avoid responsibility for cleaning it up.

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: Dwight Worker

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Tonight Interchange presents the second episode in our “Best of Andy Mahler” series.

Mahler’s guest in this program is Dwight Worker, long-time Bloomington resident, author, adventurer, and activist. Worker talks about his early years as an anti-war and civil rights activist at IU in the 60s, his escape from a Mexican prison in the 70s, his career in information systems in the 80s, his adventures as a drift-net sinker in the 90s, and his most recent career as a professor of information security at IU. This is one lively Interchange you won’t want to miss!

If you liked this interview and want to hear more with Andy Mahler just head to the archives! Here’s a shortcut: Andy Mahler on Interchange.

Interchange – The Best of Andy Mahler: Annemarie Mahler

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During the month of  July our News Department programming will consist of a “Best Of ” series as we direct and attend our first ever WFHB News Summit.  Our “Best of Interchange” highlights programs by host Andy Mahler, the recipient of the 2009 WFHB Legacy Award. In the first of these programs Andy interviews his mother, the artist Annemarie Mahler.

Annemarie (Ettinger) Mahler was born in Vienna, Austria in April of 1926. She eventually wound up in Bloomington but spent time in a Dutch orphanage, New York City, Berkeley, Dallas, and Madison, Wisconsin (and many other places) along the way. At Berkeley, she met and married a young biochemist named Henry Mahler, also born in Vienna. Incredibly, they had gone to the same elementary school yet had never met. They had three children, one of whom asks her about her life, love, her art, and anything else you might ask your own mother about on a live call-in radio program.

So tune in to Interchange to hear voices from the past as we prepare for our future. You’ll hear four great shows from our past. There are hundreds more to choose from. Get thee to the Interchange Archives and set to downloading!

Future show guests are:

July 15: Dwight Worker

July 22: Maurice Manning

July 29: Mick Harrison

Interchange – The 2014 WFHB News Summit: A Discussion with Alycin Bektesh

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Host Doug Storm asks WFHB News Director, Alycin Bektesh, questions about the upcoming WFHB News Summit.

Anyone with an interest in the current status of the News Department, the future of particular shows, or a desire to learn more radio skills is invited. You do not have to be a current volunteer in the News Department to attend any of the sessions.  The first week of sessions, July 7th – July 11th will be geared toward information sessions on current procedures and practices, as well as program staff/listener meet and greets.

The Summit takes place July 7th through August 1st, Monday through Friday, 11am  – 12pm. Sessions range from 45 minutes to 90 minutes and fall into one of three tracks: Big Ideas, Individual Programing, & Training. The same sessions are held at the same time each week, and each week takes on a different focus. Week one: Introductions,  Week Two: Brainstorming, Week Three: Action Plan, Week Four: Implementation.

A quick overview of the whole month’s schedule is available here: 2014 Summit Schedule.

Interchange – Subverting Democracy Through Education Reform

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Host Doug Storm is joined by prominent blogger and Purdue PhD candidate Freddie DeBoer. DeBoer’s blog, Interfaces of the Word, is often linked to and excerpted by such national bloggers and columnists like Andrew Sullivan at The Daily Dish and Ta-Nehisi Coates at The Atlantic Monthly. His essays have appeared in New Inquiry, Salon, and Jacobin.

DeBoer is currently writing a dissertation, on the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) and its successor, the CLA+, developed by the Council for Aid to Education.

We look at  issues in the politics and economics of our education system tonight with a fair amount of focus on Bill Gates whose Foundation has been said to have enacted an educational coup with the recent overwhelming acceptance of Common Core State Standards. And, due to the way most education policy is implemented in the states, there didn’t even need to be any public discussion or consent.

Big Philanthropy in Education is as much a subversion of the democratic process as the  McCutcheon decision by the Supreme Court to uncap the number of candidates to which an individual can give money.

 

Interchange – Courting the 1%: The Roberts Court and Money

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Host Doug Storm talks with Steve Sanders an associate professor in the Maurer School of Law at Indiana University. Sanders teaches in the areas of constitutional and public law while his current scholarship focuses on issues affecting same-sex couples and their families at the intersection of constitutional law, conflict of laws, federalism, and family law.

We spend the hour talking about recent Supreme Court decisions made by The Roberts Court. As the court is now decidedly split to favor money and power–routinely protecting institutional and financial power over the individual citizen–it seems to be working with an agenda in mind.

The Supreme Court of the United States is clearly a political and ideological institution and in our oligarchical moment of history, it is working in overdrive to support the designs of the 1% among us. Perhaps you’ll doubt my framing of the situation, but the record is clear as to the ideological bias of the court, and it’s moved further right since the appointments of Richard Nixon. In fact the justice often referred to as the “swing” vote on the Court, that one vote that clubs with either the 4 on the right or the 4 on the left, is the conservative Anthony Kennedy, a Reagan appointee.

Cases discussed:

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission

Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action

Interchange – Public Education: Dividing the Conquered

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Tonight we try to think about the way Public Education is politicized and the way that the politics of education as a system of social management has made secondary considerations of learning as a path to human flourishing. Unless of course you consider workforce training the path to a realization of your human potential. We raise the issue of our public education system as fulfilling a kind of economic function as well. Where else will Pearson Education sell their wares? Where else will Bill Gates dump all his technology products? The host is Doug Storm.

Joining us for this conversation are:

Cathy Fuentes-Rowher, Chair of the Monroe County/South Central Indiana branch of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education–a grassroots group of people who believe that fully funded and equitable public schools are essential for a healthy democracy.

Cathy Diersing, the School Leader of The Bloomington Project School: a Charter school.

Steve “Roc” Boncheck, a founder and Director of the Harmony School here in Bloomington. Harmony is an Independent school.

Interchange – Reading Moby Dick: Melville’s Wicked Book

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Host Doug Storm is joined by three professors of literature at Indiana University, Jennifer Fleissner, Jonathan Elmer, and Christoph Irmscher, to examine Herman Melville’s great book, Moby Dick. Each of these readers and teachers share a favorite passage from the novel and try to say just what makes them respond with awe to this novel.

Jennifer Fleissner reads Chapter 25, “Postcript.”
Jonathan Elmer reads the famous “Hotel de Cluny” passage from Chapter 41, “Moby Dick.”
Christoph Irmscher examines Chapter 87, “The Grand Armada.”

Deep calls unto deep. That is the whale song of Herman Melville who wrote to Nathaniel Hawthorne in response to the enthusiasm this friend and fellow traveller showed for his novel.

A sense of unspeakable security is in me this moment, on account of your having understood the book. I have written a wicked book, and feel spotless as the lamb. Ineffable socialities are in me. I would sit down and dine with you and all the gods in old Rome’s Pantheon. It is a strange feeling — no hopefulness is in it, no despair. Content — that is it; and irresponsibility; but without licentious inclination. I speak now of my profoundest sense of being, not of an incidental feeling. (Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne, November [17?] 1851)

Interchange – Voices On the Hill

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For our program tonight, Voices on the Hill, Interchange producers Doug Storm and Trish Kerlé wend their way through Rose Hill Cemetery accompanied by Voces Novae, a local chamber choir under the artistic direction of Sue Swaney.

On May 17th Voces Novae gathered at the gates of Rose Hill Cemetery to begin what they termed a “musical walking tour” of the cemetery. The group, along with an audience which seemed to grow in number as they moved from stone to stone, walked to a designated gravesite and then Sue Swaney would speak a bit about the person buried there and then a song would be sung in tribute to that person (and “in tune” with that person’s biography or achievements).

But we’re going to plant the songs sung by Voces Novae like peonies around the gravestones.

This is the story of Rose Hill told by 3 people who have different relationships with the Cemetery. Together their stories will offer some new perspectives on a 200-year-old outdoor museum in Bloomington that, up until now, may have been all but invisible to citizens.

Also performing in the cemetery were Cindy Kallet and Grey Larsen, local folk musicians who released a much acclaimed album in 2007 titled Cross the Water.

We bring you this Interchange in two parts. In our first segment we’ll hear from the most powerful man in Bloomington, Jay Davidson, Sexton of the Rose Hill Cemetery and self-styled King of the Dead and in the second we’ll meet two keepers of the dead, Sally Gaskill and Lou Malcomb, both of whom work to keep what was lost found.

Of related interest:

Voces Novae

Cindy Kallet & Grey Larsen

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