Home > News > Interchange

Interchange

In-depth interviews and conversations
Find more podcasts in the WFHB Archive

Interchange – Matilda and the Wobblies

From the Ukrainian Pale to Bridgeport, Connecticut. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Radicalized by deplorable labor conditions for immigrants in America, Matilda Rabinowitz became one of the only women to organize for the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Rabinowitz immigrated to the United States from Ukraine at the age of thirteen. …

Read More »

Interchange – Leon Trotsky, or The Revolution Betrayed

Our show today is another in our series on the Russian Revolution of 1917. This time our focus is on Leon Trotsky. Our music throughout is by the 80s English, socialist, skinhead, soul, punk group, The Redskins. We open with “Lev Bronstein.” The dream of socialism as an organizing principle has been deemed an inevitable failure — and logically undemocratic …

Read More »

Interchange – Understanding Stalin: The Russian Revolution (Part Two)

In the conclusion of Hiroaki Kuromiya’s 1991 short biography of Stalin, he tells us what might be all we need to know of Stalin’s worldview: first, Stalin underlined the following passage in Trotsky’s 1920 Terrorism and Communism, “If human life in general is sacred and inviolable, we must deny ourselves not only the use of terror, not only war, but …

Read More »

Interchange – The Past Is Uncertain: The Russian Revolution (Part One)

It’s October 24th 2017, nearly 100 years ago to the day in 1917*, Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov became Chairman of the Council of People’s Commisars in Russia. Ulanov is better known to us as Lenin. Michel Foucault said in 1977 that “It is the desirability of the revolution which causes a problem today.” Well, that today being 40 years ago, and …

Read More »

Interchange – Walking the Talk: The Revolutionary Abolitionist Benjamin Lay

Today, the curious case of Benjamin Lay: Englishman, Quaker, cobbler, sailor, cultural shock firebrand, cave dweller, autodidact, animal liberationist, and outspoken critic of the hypocrisy of slave-owning Quakers in 18th century Pennsylvania. He would become known as one of the last radicals of the English revolution — an uprising in the mid 17th century against royal power, and an early …

Read More »

Arts Interchange – Chekhov’s Three Sisters: Where There’s a Will…

Our opening song is surely well-known–this is “Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay” performed here by Elsa Lanchester, which Chebutykin, the doctor in Chekhov’s Three Sisters, periodically, perhaps pointedly, hums. Believe it or not, the lyrics from this 1891 minstrel farce variety show called Tuxedo do apply here. It may also be of interest that Henry Sayers, credited with the composition, claims not to …

Read More »

Interchange – Who Owns the Radio? A Fund Drive Special

For our Fall Fund Drive show we offer some program highlights from the last several months to show, not tell, how deserving we are of your financial support. And we open the show with The Who’s “Eminence Front”…it’s a favorite of mine. We used this in the show with Thomas Frank, “It Takes a Democrat.” The sun shines And people …

Read More »

Interchange – The Evolution of AIDS

Human hands unwittingly unleashed the AIDS epidemic and can now overcome it, if we learn the lessons of the past. This week on Interchange guest host Joan Hawkins welcomes James Kelly of IU’s Media School discuss the evolution of AIDS, from its origins in the equatorial forests of Cameroon to its outbreak in the 1980s to the efforts currently being …

Read More »

Interchange – The Troublesome Films of Charles Burnett

We’re joined by James Naremore to discuss the cinema of Charles Burnett, who’s been called the nation’s least-known great filmmaker and the country’s most important African-American director. His major works, such as Killer of Sheep, To Sleep with Anger, The Glass Shield, and Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property explore history’s effect on the structure of family. In films about working-class …

Read More »

Interchange – In the Name of the Family: The Moral Uses of Welfare

The “father of the modern welfare state” is said to be Lester Frank Ward, an American sociologist who published his major work in the midst of what is called the Gilded Age, 1870-1900 (which incidentally also dovetails with the end of Reconstruction and the inception of Jim Crow Laws). He believed “A sociology which intelligently and scientifically directed the social …

Read More »