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Interchange – Education: The Local Up Against the Global

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Host Doug Storm offers selections from two previous shows on the state of public education in Indiana and the nation.

Part I

The program begins with the first half of our October 1, 2013 program, “The State of Education in Indiana.

Our guests for the October 1, 2013 program were Vic Smith, Board President of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education; Phil Harris, the Executive Director of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology; and Gary Crow, a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

Our topics included the coercive economics of educational products corporations like Pearson Education, the funding of charter schools by foundations like the Lilly Endowment which have tremendous reach by placing employees in government to influence public policy, and the role the school used to play, ought to play, but no longer does, in developing a democratic citizen. Listen closely as the guests focus on how educating for democracy ought to be “non-partisan.”

Part II

This segment excerpts our June 24, 2014 program, “Subverting Democracy Through Education Reform.” We invited nationally known blogger and Purdue PhD student Freddie DeBoer to join us. DeBoer is writing a dissertation on the Collegiate Learning Assessment ( or CLA) and its successor, the CLA+, which was developed by the Council for Aid to Education

In that show we looked at issues in the politics and economics of our education system with a fair amount of focus on Bill Gates who seems to be the shadow secretary of the department of education (and a big shadow at that). We also discussed the manufacturing of the CRISIS Narrative to sell the desperate need for educational reform to “keep pace” with the world’s labor markets.

Our break music tonight was from Hoosier School Heist author Doug Martin’s song, “When I-Step Was a Famous Dance.

Of related interest:

Interchange – Doug Martin: Muckraking Education Politics

Credits:

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Brave New GMOs

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Tonight’s guest is long-time critic of genetically modified organisms and foods, Marti Crouch, a noted academic research scientist in plant molecular biology who turned her back on that career due to concerns about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture.

With and a new wave of genetically engineered crops (GMOs) about to be commercialized, the battle for hearts and minds is heating up. Are GMOs required to feed the burgeoning population and to save the planet, as the biotech industry claims, or are GMOs a toxic hindrance to true food security and environmental sustainability, as critics contend? Join our guest, long-time GMO critic Marti Crouch, as we explore the implications of Dow Chemical’s new corn and soybeans engineered to withstand the WWII-era weedkiller 2,4-D – approved by federal regulators just a few weeks ago; Monsanto’s new herbicide-resistant cotton and soybean, Arctic apples that don’t turn brown, eucalyptus trees that withstand freezing, golden rice designed to alleviate vitamin A deficiencies, and other brave new crops on our horizon.

Ralph Waldo Emerson writes in his great 1842 Essay Experience that “Nature hates calculators; her methods are saltatory and impulsive.”

Marti Crouch has written that “Genes have an ecology – a complex way of interacting with themselves and the environment – that can interfere with the linear logic of genetic engineering.”

Nature leaps and dances upon (and over and under and to the side of) the linear…

Guest Bio:

Martha Crouch, Ph.D., Science Consultant

Marti was a graduate student at Yale University studying the development of seeds and flowers when genes were first cloned in the 1970s.  By the time she headed her own plant molecular biology lab at Indiana University in the 1980s, plant genes were being patented. Prof. Crouch became concerned about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture and her own contributions, and as a result shut down her research lab in the 1990s and taught courses on the intersections of technology, food and agriculture, with an emphasis on environmental impacts. In 2001, Marti left Indiana University, and now pursues independent scholarship and consulting.  Her background thus spans the whole history of genetic engineering in agriculture, as both a participant and a critic, giving Marti a valuable set of skills and perspectives for her work on impacts of recent technologies for non-profits such as the Center for Food Safety.  Marti is also the official wild mushroom inspector at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Part II of To Cull Is to Kill

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Host Doug Storm welcomes guests Alyce Miller, Dave Rollo, Sandra Shapshay, and Lisa Sideris for Part II of our discussion about the Griffy Lake Nature Preserve deer cull scheduled to begin in November and last through the end of February.

There is great contention between groups opposed to the violent intervention of a kill and those who feel the kill is necessary to protect biodiversity at Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

We try in the second half of the show to understand the “gift” in Genesis 1:28.

And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.(KJV)

The implicit question in both of our programs comes from Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring:

Who has decided—who has the right to decide—for the countless legions of people who were not consulted that the supreme value is a world without insects, even though it be also a sterile world ungraced by the curving wing of a bird in flight? The decision is that of the authoritarian temporarily entrusted with power; he has made it during a moment of inattention by millions to whom beauty and the ordered world of nature still have meaning that is deep and imperative.

For Questions or Comments please email us: interchange@wfhb.org.

Of related interest:

Two groups of note are mentioned in the program: The Humane Society of the United States and The Nature Conservancy. Here are the “SourceWatch” pages for both.

The Nature Conservancy
The Humane Society of the United States

Credits:
Host and Producer, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – To Cull Is To Kill: Part One

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Host Doug Storm welcomes Alyce Miller, Dave Rollo, and Sandra Shapshay to discuss Bloomington’s approach to deer management in the city limits and at Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

From the acknowledgments page of City of Bloomington’s Deer Task Force Report:

While the State has exclusive jurisdiction over deer management [IDNR representatives] have worked hard to listen to the concerns of the Task Force and the community to help us develop recommendations that suit the unique needs of Bloomington and Monroe County. And while they never complained about our interminable meetings or endless questions, no doubt Aldo Leopold’s observation that “The real problem of wildlife management is not how we should handle the animals…the real problem is one of human management” rings true…

The decision to define deer populations as stable, healthy, abundant, overabundant, or call them rats with hooves, or nuisance animals, or even the opposite of this such as the quasi-mystical forest denizen deserving of reverence, is to impose a human worldview upon them. And it is the act of managing this worldview that is as important as the decision to contract the sharpshooters of the company White Buffalo to kill the animal in question.

Because there is so much to talk about on the subject of the lethal cull of deer by sharpshooters in Griffy Lake Nature Preserve as well as the change to the city’s municipal code to allow firearms to be discharged with the city limits we’re going to continue this program next week on our 10/14 program. We’ll be joined again by Dave Rollo, Alyce Miller and Sandra Shapshay.

So Part II of To Cull is Kill: The Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Deer Kill next week on Interchange.

Of related interest:
Effects of abundant white-tailed deer on vegetation, animals, mycorrhizal fungi, and soils

Credits:

Host and Producer, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Claims on the Forest

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Myke Luurtsema, the Hoosier Forest Watch Coordinator for the Indiana Forest Alliance (IFA), and Ron Kerner, a mushroom expert who runs the website Indiana Mushrooms.

This is Part II of our discussion about commercial logging and forest health in the Indiana state forests. Part I was a conversation that took place on September 9th with the Director of the Division of Forestry, John Seifert.

The discussion centers on the assertion that the Forestry Division treats the forest as a kind of agricultural crop and chooses to implement methods that value the tree by its harvest value (silviculture). We also discuss the ways that clear cutting or “regenerative openings” disturb habitat and disrupt ecosystem health. One feature of this is the vital symbiotic role that healthy fungi play in the growth of forests. A final topic is the IFA’s campaign to create State Wild Areas in our state forests.

Where John Seifert makes claims for the benefit of introducing sunlight to enhance diversity (through “regenerative openings”)–”sunlight drives the system”–Luurtsema claims “sunlight drives the crop tree while mortality drives the ecosystem.”

Credits:
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Hoosier: What’s In a Name?

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Hosts Doug Storm and Trish Kerle’ are joined by historian Jim Madison to discuss the Hoosier through history. Madison has just published a new book, Hoosiers: A New History of Indiana, published by Indiana University Press.

Our three segments cover the origin and cultural identity embodied in the very word “Hoosier,” the geographical make-up of the state and attendant migration patterns for settlers from the East and the Upland South; the “contradictions” of an anti-slavery state that is also deeply troubled with racism; the development of the state as an industrial “mecca.”

Credits:

Host: Doug Storm
Co-Host: Trish Kerle’
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

 

Interchange – Indiana Moral Mondays

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Host Doug Storm is joined by William Morris and Joe Varga to discuss the genesis of the Moral Mondays Movement in North Carolina and how it has begun to form a broad coalition here in Indiana.

A Mother Jones article from April, 2014 describes the impetus for Moral Mondays as being political action against a Republican agenda in North Carolina. The Republicans ”who in November 2012 took control of the state Legislature and the governor’s mansion for the first time in more than a century. Among their top priorities—along with blocking Medicaid expansion and cutting unemployment benefits and higher-education spending—was pushing through a raft of changes to election laws, including reducing the number of early voting days, ending same-day voter registration, and requiring ID at the polls.”

But perhaps deeper than this “fusion politics” is an engagement with an ethics of care.

The Indiana Moral Mondays Mission Statement:

We, the people, coalitions and faith communities of Indiana hereby form Indiana Moral Mondays Movement in order to promote a just society in which every person is valued, and resources are used for the common good.

In doing so, we seek to embrace the moral values and the enduring qualities of love found in the secular and spiritual communities from which we come.

Find out about this weekend’s event in Indianapolis, “Forward Together with Reverend Dr. William Barber II”  at the group’s website, Indiana Moral Mondays.

Guests:
William Morris is an attorney with Indiana Legal Services where he works on low-income housing and homelessness prevention. Prior to that he was a civil rights lawyer for a dozen years in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Morris is a member of the Indiana Moral Mondays Steering Committee.

Joe Varga is an Assistant Professor of Labor Studies at Indiana University. He is a former Teamster shop steward and long time labor activist, having worked for the IBEW and the New York State Working Families Party. He is currently working on a project detailing the spatial history of de-industrialization in Southern Indiana. Joe is also active in Jobs with Justice, and numerous other activist causes.

Credits:

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Logging in Indiana State Forests: State Forester John Seifert

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Host Doug Storm is joined by John Seifert, Indiana’s State Forester. We discuss logging in Yellowwood State Forest and the management of public forest lands. Other topics include the marked increase in commercial logging since 2002; invasive plant species in clear-cut land; the science of carbon sequestration; and the politics of resource management.

Credits:
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson with assistance from Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Marriage Equality: From the Margins to the Mainstream

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Hosts Doug Storm and Trish Kerle’ explore some of the nuances, complexities and limitations of marriage for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community – the LGBT community – from a decidedly left of center – some might even say, radical – political and cultural perspective. This is not an anti-marriage or anti-marriage equality show. It is, however, our attempt to underscore that marriage may not be an obvious or clear-cut decision for all same-gender couples.

Since the overturning of the Defense of Marriage Act (otherwise known as DOMA or Windsor vs. the United States) in June 2013, there have been dozens of victories for the freedom to marry, with many of those rulings on hold pending appeal. As of today, 19 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have legalized marriage for lesbian and gay couples.

In Indiana, same-sex couples were getting legally married for three days in June 2014 (when the ban on marriage was overturned), until the state was granted a stay of that decision. Then, on August 26, 2014, cases from IN and WI were presented to a panel of three federal judges with the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. It’s uncertain when a ruling by that panel will be announced, but many legal experts expect the U.S. Supreme Court will settle the issue of marriage equality once and for all in the coming session.

Guests:

Byron Craig holds two degrees from Indiana University – a master’s degree in African American and African Diaspora Studies and a PhD in Communications and Culture. His research explores the intersections of race, gender and class and he is a faculty lecturer with the Kelley School of Business at IU.

Colin Johnson is Associate Professor of Gender Studies and Adjunct Associate Professor of American Studies, History and Human Biology at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he teaches courses on LGBT studies and the history of gender and sexuality in the United States.

Credits:

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Co-Host: Trish Kerle’
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Measured by Mistakes: The Reality and Representation of Policing

Tonight’s program seeks to shine a light first on what’s been called the “militarization” of police across the country due to something like a federal “give away” program where state and local forces are made the beneficiaries of excess military production (the “1033 Program”). We’ll also try to detach that reality from the “on the ground” aspects of being a police officer in a community. And finally, I’ll ask our guests to answer one question: Which should we want, officers of the law or officers of the peace?

Our guests are Monroe County Sheriff James Kennedy who has held that elected office since 2007, and Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Greg Jeffers whose research focuses on police-citizen interactions and resident’s perceptions of the police.

Of Related Interest:
Interchange – Policing Race in America: Ferguson, Missouri

Bring it On Guests Discuss NAACP Suggestions for Encounters with the Police

Bring It On! – August 18, 2014

Credits:
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson with assistance from Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

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