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Interchange – Let the Sunshine In: The Politics Obstructing Solar Energy in Indiana

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Host Doug Storm is joined by two local solar energy activists and a climate scientists to discuss the state of renewable energy policy in Indiana. Last week Republican State Representative for District 65, Eric Allen Koch, filed a bill (HB1320) with the General Assembly that would change the relationship between our area’s electric utility company, Duke Energy, and its solar customers who participate in the popular net metering program. We’ll do our best here tonight to describe the consequences of that bill should it find its way to becoming law.

Solar energy is a major form of renewable energy used to produce electricity. It poses a major alternative to coal, Indiana’s traditional source of energy. Residential energy use totals over $3.2 billion in Indiana, making residential solar a very real threat to the coal economy.

HB1320 seeks to eliminate the productive incentive of returning energy to the power grid from a home photovoltaic system.

Links:
Monroe County Energy Challenge
Indiana’s State Energy Plan
SIREN
HB1320 in the news

Guests
Ben Brabson is a climate scientist at Indiana University and retired professor of physics, whose research focuses on extreme temperatures and their connection to soil moisture. The courses he teaches at Indiana University identify our sources of energy and the critical need to move away from climate damaging fossil fuel use.

Woodie Bessler is an electrical engineer and spokesperson for SIREN, the Southern Indiana Renewable Energy Network, a non-profit promoter of the adoption of solar energy. He speaks widely on solar energy issues. He and his household were the grand prize winners of SIREN’s 2010 Energy Showdown Going Solar programs. He currently serves on committees for GUEP (Georgetown University Energy Prize), about which we hope to get an update.

Arvind Gopu is an IT professional who does Going Solar presentations for SIREN and provides individual home site assessments.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Assistant Producer: Nancy Jones
Board Engineer: Carissa Barrett
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – The Acceptable MLK: Speech Over Action

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Rasul Mowatt and Jacinda Townsend to discuss why Martin Luther King, Jr. has been remembered and elevated to represent the struggle toward civil rights as opposed to other civil rights leaders such as Malcolm X; and how creating a “great leader” to follow can undermine the support of community movements for social and economic justice.

Rasul Mowatt is an Associate Professor in Indiana University’s School of Public Health.

Jacinda Townsend is an Assistant Professor the English Department  at Indiana University and author of the novel Saint Monkey.

Credits:

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Unprotected: On Cybersecurity

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Host Doug Storm is joined by David Delaney from the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Steve Myers from the School of Informatics and Computing to talk about cybersecurity in the public and private sphere.

From the recent hack into Sony Industries ostensibly perpetrated by North Korea to oil pipeline sabotage in Turkey, both our physical places and our digital spaces are vulnerable to almost anyone or any “nation-state” with the right skill-set and knowledge. As guest Steve Myers said, uranium isn’t cheap, but people with computer knowledge are.

Of Related Interest
Interchange – Fred Cate: Government Surveillance, Then and Now
Interchange – Colin Allen: Thinking About Thinking Machines

Credits
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Beyond Description: Witnessing Historical Trauma

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Tonight’s program is one half of a collaboration with WFHB’s Books Unbound centered around a memoir of a first-person eyewitness account written by Wang Xiuchu of the 1645 Massacre in Yangzhou, China, called, in English, An Account of Ten days at Yangzhou. This memoir will be featured this Saturday at 5 pm on Books Unbound. The Massacre at Yangzhou was translated by Lynn Struve, and the memoir is read by Eric Rensberger.

 Tonight we hear from Lynn Struve about this memoir as well as the historical context in which it takes place. We’ll also get some idea about how to think about the events in the narrative. But this story has two voices. Wang Xiuchu lives the events–but he is one of the crowd, lucky (if he can be called lucky) to escape death. There is also the voice of Shi Kefa, who was the soldier statesmen responsible for defending Yangzhou at the time of the Massacre. Frank Buczolich reads a letter home from Shi Kefa, the man who has come to represent the epitome of patriotic Chinese resistance to modern nationalistic writers. But we should not be so sanguine about that particular interpretation of history. Wang Xiuchu, and Lynn Struve, help us with that.

Patsy Rahn, a local poet who works in the Education Department of the Indiana University Art Museum, introduces her interview with retired IU professor, Chinese scholar and translator, Lynn Struve for Interchange.

Script assistance from Cynthia Wolfe.

Credits:
Producer and Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – A Box Within a Box Within a Box: The Riddle of the Raintree

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As I considered making a show to serve as a kind of year in review, I first thought to choose my favorite program from each month of the year, 12 shows, excerpt 3 minutes for flavor, a bit of commentary or set-up. Well, when I got to the month of May and saw three weeks of Raintree County–and remembered my interest and involvement with this book and the world of its author and his suicide at the peak of his worldly success–I made a new plan. My most important story of 2014, reading and thinking about Raintree County in the 100th anniversary of the author’s birth.

Raintree County was published in 1948, the same year as Indiana University professor Alfred Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and these two authors and these two books might actually illuminate each other.

Also, a quick note to let you know that the music you hear within these programs is from the soundtrack to the movie Raintree County, the 1957 film starring Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift, Eva Marie Saint and Lee Marvin. Johnny Green was the composer.

Part I excerpts the May 6th episode Taking the Measure of Raintree County and my guests are Don Gray, emeritus professor of English literature at Indiana University; Eric Sandweiss, Carmony Chair in the Department of History at IU and Editor of the Indiana Magazine of History; and Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts at The Lilly Library at Indiana University. Much of this episode focused on an exhibit of Lockridge Jr.’s personal papers, manuscripts, and family memorabilia showcased at the Lilly Library, in particular the one artifact that serves as the novel’s framing device, The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Henry County Indiana of 1875.

Part II excerpts the May 13th program which consisted of my interview with Ross Lockridge Jr.’s second son, Larry Lockridge, whose biography Shade of the Raintree was re-issued by Indiana University Press this year in a 20th anniversary edition.

Part III excerpts my interview with Ernest Lockridge, the oldest of son of the Ross Lockridge, Jr. and author of several novels, Prince Elmo’s Fire being the most successful, and a kind of photo expose/memoir called The Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father.

Full Episodes:

Interchange – Taking the Measure of Raintree County

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: In the Shade of the Raintree

Interchange – Ernest Lockridge: The Nostalgia of Emptiness in Raintree County

Credits:
Producer & Host is Doug Storm.
Board Engineer is Jonathan Richardson.
Carissa Barrett coordinates our social media.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – The Hoarders: Pathologizing the Packrat

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We’re joined by Scott Herring, author of The Hoarders, a cultural history of the recent DSM-5 diagnosis of Hoarding Disorder. We talk about famous pack rats such as the Collyer Brothers of Harlem, Andy Warhol, and Big Edie and Little Edie Beale from the documentary Grey Gardens. Herring argues that this new disease has a significant–and overlooked–cultural back story from the 1930s to the present.

Also discussed: Ralph and Terry Kovel, authors of a nationally syndicated collectibles column that began in 1955; and Sandra Felton, “The Organizer Lady” and founder of “Messies Anonymous.”

Scott Herring is an associate professor in the Department of English at Indiana University.

The Hoarders: Material Deviance in Modern American Culture

Credits:
Producer & Host is Doug Storm.
Board Engineer is Jonathan Richardson.
Carissa Barrett coordinates our social media.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – Rape and White Male Privilege

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Host Doug Storm is joined by Jen Maher, Rasul Mowatt and Justin Garcia a second time to try to figure out how to talk about rape, sexual violence and sexual privilege, all of which seem cultural prerogatives for white males in the United States. The show focuses on “Affirmative Consent” laws and the responsibility of the institutions which “look the other” way or actively promote binge alcohol consumption.

Guests:
Jen Maher, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Gender Studies at Indiana University.
Justin Garcia, Director of Education & Research Training at The Kinsey Institute and Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Indiana University.
Rasul Mowatt, Associate Professor in the School of Public Health.

Credits:
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Breaking the Rulers: The Neoliberal University

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One tends to get easily bogged down and confused by the jargon used to describe particular powerful factions in our mislabeled Democracy and it’s hard not to think this is intentional on the part of pundits and policy wonks at billionaire-funded think-tanks. In this episode we try to make clear what the term Neoliberal means and see how it can be applied to the world of the American University, and in the process hope to identify the way the University system has come to view the student as only an industrial widget–a consumer of edutainment–and a commodity in the “free market” calculus.

Guests:

Jon Simons, an Associate Professor of Communication and Culture at Indiana University Bloomington. His research is about cultural theory, the connection between popular culture and politics, and images of peace in the Israeli peace movement. He is a member of the newly formed Faculty Governance Caucus that successfully ran a slate for the last Bloomington Faculty Council elections.

David Fisher, a professor of mathematics at IUB. He works on geometry and dynamics and is particularly interested in objects with lots of symmetry. He is a member of the newly formed Faculty Governance Caucus that successfully ran a slate for the last Bloomington Faculty Council elections. In 2011, he organized a petition which played a role in reversing IU’s attempt to turn health insurance into a mode of monitoring employee health.

Cassidy Sugimoto, an Assistant Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University Bloomington. She studies and teaches in the areas of scholarly communication and scientometrics. Her most recent book compilations have looked at the historical criticism of scholarly metrics and have explored the proliferation of novel forms of tools for scholarly assessment. She has been active in shared governance at IUB since her arrival in 2010 and is currently serving as President-Elect of the Bloomington Faculty Council.

Of related interest:

Bloomington Faculty Council

The Bicentennial Strategic Plan for Indiana University, approved by the Board of Trustees at its December 2014 meeting, includes eight strategic priorities that will be addressed between now and IU’s bicentennial in 2020. The plan provides a roadmap for IU’s efforts to remain among the best public research universities.

Biography of IU President Michael A. McRobbie

IU Board of Trustees

Credits:
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Understanding the Role of the Local School Board

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School Boards seem to have arisen alongside public schooling in general. In 1826 Massachusetts formally established the system of school committees by requiring each town to elect a separate school committee to have “the general charge and superintendence” of all the public schools of the town. Over time, this model spread to the rest of the nation, insuring that local citizens would have a direct voice in the development and governance of their public schools.

But groups like ALEC (American Legislative Exchange Council) want to do away with the School Board; state legislatures across the country continue to take away the power of communities to educate their citizens requiring measures of success that do little to foster learning. How can a School Board fight back?

Guests:

Ray Golarz is a former Indiana teacher and superintendent and co-author of the 2012 book The Problem Isn’t Teachers; he has been recognized especially for his pioneering work in implementing site-based shared decision-making. During his career he has served as a middle and high school teacher, administrator at various levels including superintendent, and has taught at St. Joseph’s College, Purdue University Calumet, Indiana University Northwest, and City University in Seattle.

Jenny Robinson is a parent with two children attending MCCSC schools, and a board member of the Monroe County branch of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education (or ICPE Monroe County).

Credits:

Host and Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Making the Case Against Cages; Being Vulnerable to Arrest

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Segment One: Making the Case Against Cages. Prison abolitionist Micol Seigel, an associate professor in the departments of American Studies and History at Indiana University, discusses issues surrounding homelessness and incarceration in Bloomington and Monroe County.

The conversation focuses on the changes in the Indiana criminal sentencing codes that shift categories of crime, eliminates some offenses, changes the severity of penalties, and requires people convicted of crimes to serve a greater percentage of their sentence than previous rules. The impact of the rules is not yet clear, but some people in Monroe County worry that it will increase the burden on the County Jail.

While the sentencing guidelines are reported to have the effect of slowing the growth of the state’s prison population a December 2013 Associated Press Report states that the changes will actually have the opposite effect. According to Applied Research Services, Inc., the changes will increase the state’s prison population over the next 10 years due to the new law’s requirement that inmates serve at least 75 percent of their sentences. This will offset changes lawmakers made in reclassifying offenses and setting new sentencing ranges.

Segment Two: Being Vulnerable to Arrest. An interview with Bloomington Police Chief Mike Diekhoff conducted by WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford from November 18, 2013 to discuss the announcement by the city of Bloomington of extra police patrols to be assigned to the downtown area, as well as along the B-Line Trail, and the fact that surveillance cameras will be used more extensively. The Herald Times reported that the new measures were targeted at panhandling, public intoxication, and vandalism. Diekhoff asserts that the police do not target classes of people but rather people’s public behaviors.

Credits:

Producer & Host, Doug Storm
Board Engineer, Jonathan Richardson
Social Media, Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer, Alycin Bektesh

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