Home > News > Headlines (page 8)

Category Archives: Headlines

Feed Subscription

Daily Local News Headlines

Bloomington Free Parking Happy Hour

Play

Last night the Bloomington City Council voted to give downtown drivers back 2 hours of free parking each day. The Council voted to start enforcing the meter rules at 9 a.m. instead of 8 a.m. They also moved the end of parking enforcement up an hour, from 10 p.m. to 9 p.m. Council member Steve Volan presented a proposal to cut the enforcement hours. Volan said the idea was based on a proposal from Mayor Mark Kruzan’s administration.

“They were suggesting cutting 4 hours out of the 18 hour days” Volan referencing the proposal of Kruzan’s administration. “Both my ordinance only propose to cut 2 hours of the day off.” Volan states.

Cutting the enforcement hours is expected to cost the city government $175,000 a year in meter revenue. Although it approved the reduction in hours, the Council rejected another proposal that would have cut costs for drivers. Volan suggested reducing the cost of parking on the edges of downtown, where many parking spaces are under-utilized. He proposed cutting the cost from a dollar an hour to 50 cents an hour. But some Council members, including Susan Sandberg, said that would be too confusing for residents.

Sandberg exclaims, “I think consistency is our smartest strategy in trying to, again, get the public to vie in to the fact we no longer have 2 hour free parking” “having it be a dollar can be a prohibitory factor” Sandberg says.

The Council did approve several other changes to the parking rule. The parking garage on Morton Street will now allow drivers 3 hours of free parking. The Council also gave the mayor discretion to suspend meter operation on holidays and in other special circumstances, such as extreme weather. The changes don’t take effect until after the mayor signs the legislation and the City Clerk publishes it.

Law Limiting Plastic Shopping Bags

Play

Momentum is building for a law in Bloomington that would seek to limit the use of plastic shopping bags. This week the Bloomington Commission on Sustainability urged the Bloomington City Council to draw up and enact such an ordinance. Andrea Jobe, a City council appointee to the Sustainability Commission, reported to the commission about the “Bring Your Own Bag” initiative, the working title of the draft ordinance that could be brought to the City Council as soon as May.

“When fully implemented this ordinance apply to business that give away plastic bags” Jobe states. “This isn’t new” Jobe says, “Plastic bag ordinances have been effective in over 130 cities in the US…and at least 70 countries.”

Jobe said that the draft ordinance will call for a ban on stores giving non-reusable plastic bags to their customers. She said the bags cause problems beyond litter.

“They cause issues at the recycling centers and landfills and clog up the equipment” Jobe explains. “The idea is to bring a reusable bag and get the community in the habit of doing so”

It will include a charge for the supply of paper bags. There will be exemptions for plastic bags used for take-away fresh produce and meats, and for pharmaceuticals. Jobe then asked the Commission to send a letter of support for the initiative After some discussion, Jeff Jewell, Commission Chairperson, proposed and the members accepted such this request.

The College Mall Is Getting A New Look; I-69 Interchange Site Grading Approved

Play

The Bloomington Plan Commission has approved a redevelopment plan for the northeast corner of The College Mall. The proposal includes the new Wholefoods Market that is moving into the current Sears property. It also includes a Panera Bread outlet along 3rd Street and a B.J.’s Restaurant along College Mall Road. The owners of the mall, the Simon Property Group, had revised parts of the proposal at the request of Plan Commission members and staff. Eric Greulich, a city planner, outlines the main features of the development. He says that the new plan will incorporate a pedestrian network with a sidewalk and a tree plot sight connecting multiple areas.

In order to accommodate the additional buildings and make the mall more pedestrian friendly, the proposal will reduce the total number of parking spaces by about ten percent and add more greenery. At the Panera Bread site, Commission member Susan Fernandez voiced concern over pedestrians who would have to cross a drive-through lane to get to the customer entrance. Rod Bosper, a spokesman for the Simons group, responded that the new proposal was a safer proposition.

The Commission later approved the proposal. Also at the meeting, the commission heard a proposal to remove soil and grade a 28-acre site at the northeast corner of Fullerton Pike and state road 37. This intersection will become an interchange on the new Interstate 69. The Bill C. Brown Trust, the owner of the property, wants permission to do this work so it can sell the soil to the contractor building the interchange. Steve Smith, representing the owner, explained that the attendant leveling of the property would also make eventual commercial development more easy, as the owner anticipates. Commission member, Pat Williams, raised concerns about doing this grading work on a site with Karst features.

The Commission later approved the grading proposal unanimously.

Freedom Indiana Pushes For LGBT Nondiscrimination Law

Freedom Indiana announced a new campaign today, just less than two weeks after the group helped force state legislators to amend the so-called Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). The grass roots coalition is now focused on enacting protection in cities and towns protecting the LGBT community from further discrimination. In a press release today, the organization said it will work to, “adopt comprehensive nondiscrimination policies at the local level in order to provide important protections for LGBT Hoosiers until they are passed at the statewide level.” The law in Indiana does not specifically protect LGBTQ Hoosiers, meaning they can legally be discriminated against in situations such as employment. Freedom Indiana says they still plan to push for a Freedom Indiana next year.

Indiana’s Common Construction Wage Law Repeal Has Passed The State Senate

The state Senate today voted to repeal Indiana’s Common Construction Wage Law. For the past 80 years the law has established minimum pay rates for construction employees working on government projects in Indiana. Supporters of the wage law say it guarantees workers are paid a fair wage. They say it also helps protect Indiana contractors from losing business to out-of-state companies that work for cheap. But Republicans in state government have pushed to repeal the law, saying it would cut the cost of public projects. The Senate passed the repeal today today by a vote of 27 to 22, according to the Associated Press. The issue now goes back to the House of Representatives, which already passed one version of the repeal. The House must vote on the bill again because the Senate changed parts of the legislation.

Bloomington City Council Indicates Possible Significant Changes to Downtown Parking

The Bloomington City Council has indicated it may make significant changes to how it manages parking downtown. At a meeting last week there were two proposal packages. City Clerk Regina Moore summarized the first, from Council Member Steve Volan.

Moore summarizes, “This is to improve parking management in the downtown by imposing a maximum charge for on-street metered parking, setting forth actual times and fees in an amended schedule, providing a period of free parking in all garages, and establishing a fee discount and waiver program to be provided by a new parking commission.”

Volan says approximately two million dollars was collected from the new meters during the first year of their introduction. He says revenue was divided almost equally between cash versus credit card payments. Volan introduced his proposal by first framing it in what he called a mission statement for the City’s parking meter program.

Volan said, “I don’t think that we’ve actually defined what our goal is for our parking system so I have offered a few suggestions…we want to incentivise diversity and fairness for populations who use the downtown that have unique needs. And also consider that the excess revenue when we are not using it to pay for the cost of parking itself, to use it to increase the economic and social sustainability of the downtown.”

Volan’s proposal would change meter hours from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.. Currently the meters run from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. He also recommended keeping the dollar per hour charge for meters in the downtown core, while reducing the charge to fifty cents for meters on the periphery of the core. He suggested offering three hour free parking at the Morton Street Garage and allowing parking fee waivers for volunteers of non-profits. After considerable discussion on Volan’s proposal, Council member Darryl Neher introduced his proposal for changes in the city parking policy. City Clerk Moore summarized that proposal.

Moore explains, “This is in regard to shortening the hours of enforcement on street metered parking, eliminating the credit card convenience fee for meter use, authorizing the mayor to declare parking holidays, and extending hours of enforcement to Lot 9 which is the 4th street garage.”

Council member Volan pointed out that his proposal and the one from Council member Neher are complementary. A special session of the City Council has been scheduled for this Wednesday to discuss the parking issue further.

Increasing Number of HIV Cases in Southeastern Indiana

The reported number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana has increased to 106. That’s up from 89 declared cases just four days earlier.

Those numbers are all from the State Department of Health. The department has helped establish what it calls a One-Stop Shop in Scott County, where many of the cases have been discovered.

There is also a new clinic there as well as a public awareness program titled ‘You Are Not Alone.’ A 30-day needle exchange program opened in Scott County on April 4.

An Executive Order by Governor Mike Pence has suspended Indiana Code regarding needle exchange in Scott County, allowing clean needles to be freely given and dirty needles to be turned in. More than a thousand clean needles have already been distributed.

Construction on I-69 Starts Soon

Play

Construction of section 5 of I-69 on the west side of Bloomington will begin this month. In conjunction with this start, the Bloomington Board of Public Works was asked last week to grant a six-month noise permit to Isolux Corsan, for night-time work along Section 5 of the new interstate. Isolux Corsan is the lead contractor on the 21-mile section of the project, which runs from Rockport Road to just south of Martinsville.

“It would be a six month permit, however, it would be in effect on a monthly basis,” Corsan explains. “It would automatically renew, unless there were issues.”

The Board approved the noise permit subject to monthly reviews, a night-time ban on the use of jack hammers, pile drivers, and hoe rams, and minimization of vehicle back-up sounds. The permit will run from April 8th until October 8th. The spokesperson for the contractor noted that sound barriers between residences along the corridor and the construction zone would be built in conjunction with the road work.

Mayor Candidate John Hamilton Holds Fundraiser in D.C.

Play

The race for mayor of Bloomington took one candidate six hundred miles from City Hall last night.

John Hamilton, one of three Democratic candidates for mayor, held a fund raiser at Mandu Restaurant in Washington, D.C., about a mile from the U.S. Capitol building. The event was co-hosted by several prominent Democrats, including some high-profile lobbyists and public officials. Hamilton told WFHB that while the fundraiser was held far from Bloomington, the crowd had ties to Indiana.

“There is a regular group of Hoosiers who have transplanted to D.C….and welcome Hoosier candidates of many kinds to talk,” Hamilton said. “They asked whether I would do it and I said, ‘Sure.’”

Among the co-hosts listed for the event was Brad Queisser, a lobbyist with mCapitol Management in Washington. mCapitol did $2.6 million of lobbying work last year for unions, cities and companies. That included $100,000 of work for Crowe Horwath, an accounting and consulting firm that frequently contracts with the Bloomington city government.

Another co-host was Joel Riethmiller, a lobbyist whose firm did $220,000 of work last year for the Cook Group, a medical device company based in Bloomington.

When asked if he would accept campaign contributions from lobbyists, Hamilton reiterated his pledge not to accept money directly from corporations.

“I don’t accept any money from a corporation or a PAC (political action committee) which is focused on a particular issue,” Hamilton said. “As long as it’s a human being that is supporting my cause for progressive values and good jobs and strong public education…I’ll take support from that individual.”

Other co-hosts of the fund raiser last night included Anne Andrews, the U.S. Ambassador to Costa Rica, and Ron Klain, an attorney who President Obama appointed as Ebola Response Coordinator amid the beginning of the disease outbreak last year.

So far, Hamilton is the only one of the three Democrats running for mayor to acknowledge holding a fund raiser outside Indiana. But he’s not the only one to accept out-of-state contributions to his campaign. Darryl Neher is another of the three candidates.

“I’ve accepted money from out of state, but its from close friends, people whom I have know for years,” Neher said.

Andy Downs, with the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics, said it’s not unusual to see candidates for local office taking campaign money from far away.

“If, for example, you went to college outside of the state, you develop a network of friends who might want to support you when you’re running for office,” Downs explains. “What people begin to question is when you go to raise money outside the state, and you’re doing it in a lobbyist’s office or you’re doing it in a law firm…and then people start to think, ‘OK, wait a minute, those folks have obvious interests beyond their person interests in you as an individual, is this going to cause us a problem down the road?’”

The third candidate for mayor, John Linnemeier, says he has accepted no money from outside Indiana. Linnemeier says he’s only raised about $2,000 for his campaign so far. He says the candidates should not have to focus so much on money.

“I don’t even have a tab on my website that tells you how to donate,” Linnemeier said. “I mean, how many people are in Bloomington? We’re all pretty much one degree of separation from each other. I just think it’s absolutely unnecessary. And what’s worse than that is it has the possibility of corruption or the perception of it.”

So far, there are no publicly-available documents showing exactly how the mayoral candidates have been paying for their campaigns. That changes next week, when candidates are required to declare all of their campaign contributions and expenses.

A 30-Day Needle Exchange Program Is Established In Response To The HIV Outbreak In Scott County

Play

Health officials have accepted 300 used needles and tested 27 people for HIV as part ot the response to the HIV outbreak in southern Indiana. That’s according to the state’s Joint Information Center established after the outbreak was detected. There have been 89 new reported cases of HIV in Scott County and Governor Mike Pence has declared a public health emergency there. Pence also temporarily suspended state law to establish a 30-day needle exchange program. Beth Myerson, the co-director of the Rural Center for AIDS and STD Prevention at Indiana University,says the whole state of Indiana has something to learn from the recent outbreak in Scott County.

Scott County was lacking much of that public health system before the HIV outbreak was identified earlier this year. There has been no HIV testing facility in the county since a Planned Parenthood facility was closed there in 2013. That closure was blamed largely on funding cuts at the state level.

Myerson said the response to the recent crisis from the State Department of Health has mostly been good. She praised the efforts to test residents for HIV, provide them with medical records and enroll them in health coverage. But she said there are problems with the 30-day needle exchange program, questioning how the time period would be long enough to be effective.

Indiana law effectively makes it illegal to run a permanent needle exchange program. That’s because it is illegal for anyone to possess drug paraphernalia or trace amounts of drugs.

Scroll To Top