Home > News > DLN Features (page 9)

Category Archives: DLN Features

Feed Subscription

On-location features and special reports
Find more podcasts in the WFHB Archive

Indiana House of Representatives Approves Religious Freedom Restoration Act

Play

Shortly before we went to air today, the Indiana House of Representatives approved a bill that could protect businesses that discriminate against LGBT residents. The bill is known as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. It would prohibit governments from “substantially burdening a person’s exercise of religion.” Some proponents of the bill have said they hope it will protect businesses, churches or individuals that choose not to serve LGBT residents.

The bill has been widely seen as a response to the legalization of same-sex marriage in Indiana. Just before the bill passed, News Director Joe Crawford spoke with one of the leaders of the movement to oppose the measure. We bring you that interview for today’s WFHB community report.

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 63 to 31. It has already passed the Senate and Governor Mike Pence has expressed support for the legislation.

Freedom Indiana delivered thousands of letters opposing Senate Bill 101 just hours before the House of Representatives voted to pass the bill. Photo courtesy of Freedom Indiana.

Members of Freedom Indiana delivered thousands of letters opposing Senate Bill 101 just hours before the House of Representatives voted to pass the bill. Photo courtesy of Freedom Indiana.

“Civil Immunity” Law Could Help Provide Free Health Care, But at a Cost

Play

The goal of House Bill 1145, according to its authors, is pretty straightforward: to get free health care to residents who need it, to make it easier for doctors to show up at places like food banks and volunteer their time.

On its face, the strategy legislators want to use seems pretty simple: they want to eliminate the possibility a doctor could be sued after giving someone free care. They want to make it unnecessary for those doctors to carry medical malpractice insurance. Doing that, theoretically, would encourage more doctors to volunteer their time.

But in fact, it’s not simple. Legislators and attorneys have been debating the bill, known to some as the Civil Immunity Bill, for some time. Eric Koch, state representative from Bedford who is a co-author of the legislation, said the state legislature considered the bill last year.

“We just couldn’t get the bill in a form that we really felt avoided all the unintended consequences,” Koch said.

Koch is also an attorney who routinely represents clients in medical malpractice cases. If anyone should be wary of a law that makes it harder to sue doctors, you might expect it to be him. The bill, as its currently written, would allow patients to effectively sign away their rights to sue for malpractice. In exchange the patients could get free care.

“When you give an immunity, it’s a very powerful thing,” Koch said. “There have to be very compelling reasons and in this case it was the opportunity to essentially triage people and get them into a continuum of care that they need.”

To be clear, the question of medical malpractice insurance is a big one for doctors who volunteer their services. In Bloomington, the Volunteers in Medicine clinic operates 5 days a week with volunteer doctors. Nancy Richman, the executive director there, says the insurance issue was dealt with many years ago. The providers at Volunteers in Medicine are covered through the Federal Tort Claims Act, which was enacted in the mid-1990s.

“(Free) clinics are not able to afford the cost of malpractice liability for each individual provider, nor are the providers willing to pay for their own malpractice insurance when they’re going to volunteer their time,” Richman said.

Clinics like Volunteers in Medicine would not be affected by House Bill 1145. They’re specifically exempted and they continue to be covered under the federal law.  The bill only applies to doctors giving free care outside of clinics or hospitals.

And while Koch can be counted as one attorney who is satisfied with the Civil Immunity Bill, he may not represent the majority of lawyers.  The Indiana Trial Lawyers Association is not supporting the proposal.

Mickey Wilson, the executive director of the Association, says she does like this bill better than previous versions of the legislation. The new bill, for example, excludes major medical procedures. The rationale there is that patients getting non-invasive care are less likely to wind up in situations where they need to file a malpractice lawsuit. But Wilson says she’s worried many patients may not realize the implications of signing away their rights to sue.

“I think there is very little understanding of what immunity actually means,” Wilson said. “What it means is, as a matter of public policy, we know you’re going to do something that…a reasonable person would not do. And we’re going to say…you’re not going to have to pay for the harm you’re going to cause.”

Wilson agrees with the bill’s authors on one thing: the chances of any one of these affected patients needing to sue their doctor is not good. Dave Frizzell, the main author behind the legislation, says the states of Washington, South Dakota and South Carolina, already have similar laws.

“They have had no claim at all, zero, zip,” Frizzell said. “To say it’s miniscule is overstating the case.”

Again, Wilson agrees in a way. She doesn’t dispute Frizzell that there aren’t many malpractice suits associated with free care.

“The problem is if it’s your case, if it’s your child, it’s the biggest thing in your life,” Wilson said. “The tort law really is for the exception.”

Wilson says, in her mind, the problem is not with the patients or the doctors, but with the insurance companies. If these particular malpractice suits are so rare, she asks, why is the insurance so expensive?

“I think the question needs to be asked, ‘What is the basis for increasing the premium,’” she said. “And I don’t think this legislation asks that question.

After several rounds of negotiations, it appears the legislation could pass this year. The State House approved it last month by a vote of 91 to 0. The bill got a first reading in the State Senate last week. And according to Frizzell, Governor Mike Pence has made it one of his “main bills.”

And the law would fit with much of the rest of the health care agenda advanced by Indiana Republicans, who have largely suggested that the Affordable Care Act is so flawed that it’s up to state legislators to find solutions for the poor and uninsured.

The Civil Immunity Bill currently awaits a vote in the Senate’s Civil Law Committee.

With Statehouse Fighting Over Education, Ritz Stuck in the Middle

Play

This year, Indiana Governor Mike Pence has called for the state’s legislative session to focus on education. Much of that focus has been directed toward Superintendent Glenda Ritz, with bills emerging to denounce her as chair of the State Board of Education. Some view the bills as partisan attacks, others see it as a necessary step for reform. WFHB news reporter Sarah Panfil brings you an overview.

Enrollment in Indiana’s School Vouchers Program Rapidly Increasing

Play

The Center for Evaluation and Education Policy has found that enrollment in Indiana’s school vouchers program is rapidly increasing. News Director Joe Crawford spoke with a researcher at the Center for today’s WFHB community report.

New Measure Could Have Major Impact on Local Development

Play

Last night the City Council passed a measure that could have major effects on development in Bloomington. WFHB correspondent Alycin Bektesh has that story for today’s WFHB community
report.

New IU Sexual Misconduct Policy Is Signed Into Place

Play

IU is among nine universities under investigation by the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, for violating title nine protections against discrimination based on sex. Last fall the university sought input on the current policies in place addressing sexual crimes. This week, President Michael McRobbie signed the new Sexual Misconduct Policy. WFHB correspondent Alycin Bektesh speaks with members of the IU community who worked on the policy for today’s community report.

Under the new policy, the so-called “responsible employees” authorized to redress sexual misconduct include professors, advisors, coaches and university officials.

Public Transit Expansion Bill Introduced to Indiana House of Representatives

Play

A bill that could expand public transportation in rural parts of Monroe County got its first reading in the Indiana House of Representatives today. The bill has already passed in the Senate. Correspondent Sophia Saliby has the story behind the law, including concerns about its possible side effects, for today’s WFHB community report.

IU Health Bloomington Intends to Move Hosplital Elsewhere

Play

Local people continue to react to I.U. Health Bloomington’s announcement that it intends to close the Bloomington Hospital and build elsewhere. Correspondent David Murphy spoke to two candidates for election to mayor of Bloomington – Democrat John Linnemeier and Republican John Turnbull – to get their views on the hospital’s move.

He also spoke with Forrest Gilmore, Director of Shalom Community Center, to hear about that social service agency’s concerns on the closing of the downtown hospital. We bring you that story now for today’s WFHB community report.

Bloomington Task Force designated to Study Water resources

Play

The Bloomington Chamber of Commerce has convened a task force to study water resources in Monroe County and beyond. WFHB News Director Joe Crawford spoke today with Liz Irwin, a spokesperson for the Chamber. They discussed the Chamber’s concerns about how water resources could affect future development in the area. We bring you that conversation now for today’s WFHB community report. Irwin began by explaining why the Chamber assembled the task force.

Akwasi Owusu-Bempah Discusses the Dynamic Experience of African American Police Officers

Play

As police departments around the country are pressured to review the racial makeup of their staff, last week WFHB’s African American public affairs show Bring It On discussed the roles and experiences of black police officers. The hosts spoke with Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and an Adjunct Professor within Indiana University’s Department of African American and Diaspora Studies. The show was hosted by Clarence Boone and Jim Sims. We bring you a portion of that conversation for today’s WFHB community report.

Scroll To Top