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Petition Calls for Audit at Bloomingfoods


Late last week a petition began circulating in social media demanding an audit, or peer review, at Bloomingfoods, the food cooperative with four permanent locations in Bloomington. As of our deadline there were 127 signatures on that petition.

Healthy Monroe County Outbreak sponsors awareness event for PCB


Next Saturday an organization called Healthy Monroe County will sponsor an event aimed at informing local residents about the current effect of PCBs in Bloomington. PCBs, or Polychlorinated Biphenyls, are highly toxic chemicals that were banned in the U.S. in 1979. But before that, they were dumped in locations throughout the city. WFHB correspondent Emily Beck looked into the current status of the cleanup efforts. We bring you that story for today’s WFHB community report.

The event next Saturday is titled, “Bloomington’s PCBs and the Current state of Cleanup.”

Bloomington Residents Protest the Religious Freedom & Restoration Act at Rally


Roughly 200 people rallied yesterday at Karst Farm Park in Bloomington, just across the street from a local Republican fund raiser. The rally was originally scheduled to protest Governor Mike Pence, who was supposed to be the featured speaker at the event. Pence canceled his appearance amid increasing controversy over the passage of the so-called Religious Freedom Restoration Act. But the protest continued despite Pence’s absence. Protesters called for the repeal of the Act, which effectively allows individuals and businesses in Indiana to discriminate against others. Many worry the law will be used to discriminate against LGBTQ people. One of the speakers at the rally last night was Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller, who was in town to speak at the fundraiser as a substitute for Governor Pence. Zoeller spoke briefly to the protesters despite the fact that he has acted to oppose gay rights in his work as Attorney General. Zoeller, for instance, has defended the state government in court as the government opposed allowing same-sex marriage. WFHB correspondent Franki Salzman was on hand at the rally last night and we now bring you a portion of the event for today’s WFHB community report. The first speaker is Doug Bauder, the coordinator of the LGBTQ Resource Center at IU.

Bloomington Mayoral Candidates Interviewed by WFHB


Starting tomorrow evening at 6 p.m., Interchange host Doug Storm will host a series of forums on WFHB with candidates running for Bloomington City Council. Last month Storm interviewed the four candidates for mayor of Bloomington, John Hamilton, Darryl Neher, John Linnemeier and John Turnbull.

National Criticism Drawn to Indiana Over Religious Freedom Restoration Act


Governor Mike Pence has officially cancelled a trip to Bloomington as he continues to deal with fallout from the passage of the so-called Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Pence had been scheduled to speak at a dinner tomorrow night sponsored by the Monroe County Republican Party, but this afternoon the chairman of the Local Republicans, Steve Hogan, confirmed Pence called off those plans.

Protests were expected to draw hundreds of people to the Bloomington Amvets Post, where Pence was scheduled to speak. This afternoon one of the main protest organizers said the rally would still go on as planned. For more on the controversy over the new law, WFHB News Director Joe Crawford has this story.

Correspondent Alycin Bektesh contributed to this report.

“Visions of Rwanda” exhibited at Indiana University


The creators of an exhibit at Indiana University are hoping to give viewers a more complex understanding of Rwanda. Correspondent Amanda Marino has that story for today’s WFHB community report.

Could Comcast/Time Warner Merger Be Negative For Consumers?


The companies Comcast and Time Warner have proposed to merge, which would have effects on the cable market throughout the WFHB listening area. Correspondent David Murphy spoke with Herb Terry, Associate Professor at IU’s department of telecommunications, about the potential effects of the merger.

Comcast released a statement today saying they expect the federal government will take until at least the middle of 2015 to make a decision about the merger. Comcast originally expected the decision would be made by the end of 2014.

Senator Dan Coats Says No to Re-Election in 2016


Today, Dan Coats, senior Senator from Indiana, announced that he will not be running for re-election next year. According to Brian Howey of Howey Politics Indiana, he has maintained that position as the congressional GOP as a whole has moved to the right. Correspondent David Murphy spoke to Mister Howey today about Coats’ politics and the implications of his decision not to run again for the Democrats and Republicans who will seek to take this key seat. Following Senator Coats announcement, several Indiana politicians from both major parties released statements on Coats legacy.

Indiana House of Representatives Approves Religious Freedom Restoration Act


Shortly before we went to air today, the Indiana House of Representatives approved a bill that could protect businesses that discriminate against LGBT residents. The bill is known as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. It would prohibit governments from “substantially burdening a person’s exercise of religion.” Some proponents of the bill have said they hope it will protect businesses, churches or individuals that choose not to serve LGBT residents.

The bill has been widely seen as a response to the legalization of same-sex marriage in Indiana. Just before the bill passed, News Director Joe Crawford spoke with one of the leaders of the movement to oppose the measure. We bring you that interview for today’s WFHB community report.

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 63 to 31. It has already passed the Senate and Governor Mike Pence has expressed support for the legislation.

Freedom Indiana delivered thousands of letters opposing Senate Bill 101 just hours before the House of Representatives voted to pass the bill. Photo courtesy of Freedom Indiana.

Members of Freedom Indiana delivered thousands of letters opposing Senate Bill 101 just hours before the House of Representatives voted to pass the bill. Photo courtesy of Freedom Indiana.

“Civil Immunity” Law Could Help Provide Free Health Care, But at a Cost


The goal of House Bill 1145, according to its authors, is pretty straightforward: to get free health care to residents who need it, to make it easier for doctors to show up at places like food banks and volunteer their time.

On its face, the strategy legislators want to use seems pretty simple: they want to eliminate the possibility a doctor could be sued after giving someone free care. They want to make it unnecessary for those doctors to carry medical malpractice insurance. Doing that, theoretically, would encourage more doctors to volunteer their time.

But in fact, it’s not simple. Legislators and attorneys have been debating the bill, known to some as the Civil Immunity Bill, for some time. Eric Koch, state representative from Bedford who is a co-author of the legislation, said the state legislature considered the bill last year.

“We just couldn’t get the bill in a form that we really felt avoided all the unintended consequences,” Koch said.

Koch is also an attorney who routinely represents clients in medical malpractice cases. If anyone should be wary of a law that makes it harder to sue doctors, you might expect it to be him. The bill, as its currently written, would allow patients to effectively sign away their rights to sue for malpractice. In exchange the patients could get free care.

“When you give an immunity, it’s a very powerful thing,” Koch said. “There have to be very compelling reasons and in this case it was the opportunity to essentially triage people and get them into a continuum of care that they need.”

To be clear, the question of medical malpractice insurance is a big one for doctors who volunteer their services. In Bloomington, the Volunteers in Medicine clinic operates 5 days a week with volunteer doctors. Nancy Richman, the executive director there, says the insurance issue was dealt with many years ago. The providers at Volunteers in Medicine are covered through the Federal Tort Claims Act, which was enacted in the mid-1990s.

“(Free) clinics are not able to afford the cost of malpractice liability for each individual provider, nor are the providers willing to pay for their own malpractice insurance when they’re going to volunteer their time,” Richman said.

Clinics like Volunteers in Medicine would not be affected by House Bill 1145. They’re specifically exempted and they continue to be covered under the federal law.  The bill only applies to doctors giving free care outside of clinics or hospitals.

And while Koch can be counted as one attorney who is satisfied with the Civil Immunity Bill, he may not represent the majority of lawyers.  The Indiana Trial Lawyers Association is not supporting the proposal.

Mickey Wilson, the executive director of the Association, says she does like this bill better than previous versions of the legislation. The new bill, for example, excludes major medical procedures. The rationale there is that patients getting non-invasive care are less likely to wind up in situations where they need to file a malpractice lawsuit. But Wilson says she’s worried many patients may not realize the implications of signing away their rights to sue.

“I think there is very little understanding of what immunity actually means,” Wilson said. “What it means is, as a matter of public policy, we know you’re going to do something that…a reasonable person would not do. And we’re going to say…you’re not going to have to pay for the harm you’re going to cause.”

Wilson agrees with the bill’s authors on one thing: the chances of any one of these affected patients needing to sue their doctor is not good. Dave Frizzell, the main author behind the legislation, says the states of Washington, South Dakota and South Carolina, already have similar laws.

“They have had no claim at all, zero, zip,” Frizzell said. “To say it’s miniscule is overstating the case.”

Again, Wilson agrees in a way. She doesn’t dispute Frizzell that there aren’t many malpractice suits associated with free care.

“The problem is if it’s your case, if it’s your child, it’s the biggest thing in your life,” Wilson said. “The tort law really is for the exception.”

Wilson says, in her mind, the problem is not with the patients or the doctors, but with the insurance companies. If these particular malpractice suits are so rare, she asks, why is the insurance so expensive?

“I think the question needs to be asked, ‘What is the basis for increasing the premium,’” she said. “And I don’t think this legislation asks that question.

After several rounds of negotiations, it appears the legislation could pass this year. The State House approved it last month by a vote of 91 to 0. The bill got a first reading in the State Senate last week. And according to Frizzell, Governor Mike Pence has made it one of his “main bills.”

And the law would fit with much of the rest of the health care agenda advanced by Indiana Republicans, who have largely suggested that the Affordable Care Act is so flawed that it’s up to state legislators to find solutions for the poor and uninsured.

The Civil Immunity Bill currently awaits a vote in the Senate’s Civil Law Committee.

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