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The 14th annual Hoosiers Outrun Cancer

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The 14th annual Hoosier Outrun Cancer will take place this Saturday. The proceeds will go to the Olcott Center for Cancer Education, and towards services that support the families of those with cancer. Kim Rudolph, special event manager with the Bloomington Hospital Foundation, gives some background on how the event got started.

Rudolph introduces it is an event that was started since 2010. It raise  the help of support the Olcott Center for Cancer Education and it is been going on for 14 years. All of the proceeds go to the fund the support services and education for anyone in the community that diagnose any form of cancer.

There will be other activities going on before and after the race. Rudolph gives more detail on the agenda.

Rudolph said:” We have a pre-race ceremony where we honored the cancer survivors and those that have passed often cancer. The pre-race ceremony start at 9:15am. At 10:00am, we start the first 1 mile kids fun run followed by 1 mile family walk. At 10:20am, we start the 5k run and 5k walk starts right after that.  We start at the Memorial Stadium  and the finish line is IU Memorial Stadium Parking Lot. We have an award ceremony at 11:15am. At the award ceremony’s location, there is a big area for kids activities.”

Rudolph says she hopes this event will bring awareness to cancer, the number of individuals who are affected by the disease, and the services provided through the Bloomington Hospital foundation.

Rudolph mentioned that it is wonderful they have a center in town. People there would guide, educate and be with patients through the process from the time they diagnose a cancer, period of treatment and all the way to the end of the battle with cancer.

Hoosiers Outrun Cancer takes place this Saturday at the Indiana Memorial Stadium. The 5k race begins at 10:20 am, and the walk begins at 10:30 am. Late registration takes place tomorrow at the stadium, from 11 am to 6 pm, and on Saturday from 7:30 am to 9:30 am.

 

Residential Learning Community for women in STEM programs at IU

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Indiana University now ranks eleventh in the United States for female enrollment in science, technology, and math programs, according to The College Database. IU also places a strong second among Big Ten universities for women enrolled in the so-called hard sciences, or STEM programs. The Bloomington campus has ninety STEM programs, with one thousand two hundred and eighty-eight women enrolled, or fifty-one percent of the total enrollment in those programs. IU tries to help women in STEM programs succeed in teaching, research, and professional development. In addition to the Center of Excellence for Women in Technology, IU offers the Provost’s Professional Development Awards for Women in Science, and even provides a Women In Science, Technology, and Math Student Residential Community. Julianne Martin is the Provost’s Program Coordinator for the designated living center for women in science.

According to Ms. Martin, a big reason that they want to start the Residential Learning Community for women in STEM field is because it is helpful for them to retention, so they have the ability to be surrounded by peers. That solves effectively for supporting women in those fields.

STEM programs are defined by The College Database using guidelines provided by National Science Foundation for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The Bloomington campus has no engineering school, but does have one of the nation’s largest informatics and computing schools, so it classifies its programs using the STEM acronym. IU Provost Lauren Robel says the university has made a focused and deliberate effort to attract women to the sciences. She adds that IU is becoming a beacon for women in these fields. Julianne Martin says the old stereotype of science and math being male-only fields is gradually going away.

Ms. Martin explains that some fields such as biology and Chemistry at IU has a little bit more women enrolled.  But the female enrollment number for Computer Science, Physics and Astronomy are much lower. For the graduate level,  the number of women student and faculty is getting much smaller. Ms. Martin hopes that the program could helps women not only stay in these major for undergraduate, but continual on graduate program and careers in these fields.

Sarah Durkin of The College Database says the US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that jobs in the STEM fields will grow at twice the rate of other fields in the coming years.

Daily Local News – September 26, 2013

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Indiana University now ranks eleventh in the United States for female enrollment in science, technology, and math programs, according to The College Database; The 14th annual Hoosier Outrun Cancer will take place this Saturday; An Indiana University team of physicists has won a three year, five-point-four million dollar National Science Foundation award to continue its study of the inner workings of the nucleus of the atom; This week in local sports, the Bloomington South Boys Varsity Soccer team plays Perry Meridian today at 7:30 pm

FEATURE
We talk with Roger Roadheaver, Director of Baseball Operations at Indiana University, and IU baseball coach Tracy Smith, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOICES IN THE STREET
This week on the Voices in the Street:  “Friends, Fusion and Fun:  Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Lotus World Music and Arts Festival.

The Lotus Festival kicked off yesterday and the coming days promise loads of music, a parade, multiple workshops and more fun than you can shake a cabassa at.   Voices in the Street hit the streets to ask your friends and neighbors if they’re planning on attending the festival and about some of their favorite Lotus memories.

CREDITS
Anchors: Jalisa Ransom
Today’s headlines were written by Mike Glab and Jalisa Ransom
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley
Our feature producer and engineer today was Sarah Hettrick
Editor is Drew Daudelin
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

IU Ranks 11th Nationwide For Female Enrollment in STEM Programs

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Indiana University now ranks eleventh in the United States for female enrollment in science, technology, and math programs, according to The College Database.

IU also places second among Big Ten universities for women enrolled in the so-called hard sciences, or STEM programs.

The Bloomington campus has 90 STEM programs, with 1,288  women enrolled, or 51 percent of the total enrollment in those programs.

IU tries to help women in STEM programs succeed in teaching, research, and professional development.

In addition to the Center of Excellence for Women in Technology, IU offers the Provost’s Professional Development Awards for Women in Science, and provides a Women In Science, Technology, and Math Student Residential Community.

Julianne Martin is the Provost’s Program Coordinator for the designated living center for women in science.

“A big reason we wanted to start a residential learning community for women in STEM fields was to help provide support for women in those fields,” Martin says, “They get be surrounded by peers studying the same things, in the same classes and have the same academic goals.”

STEM programs are defined by The College Database using guidelines provided by National Science Foundation for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

The Bloomington campus has no engineering school, but does have one of the nation’s largest informatics and computing schools, so it classifies its programs using the STEM acronym.

IU Provost Lauren Robel says the university has made a focused and deliberate effort to attract women to the sciences. She adds that IU is becoming a beacon for women in these fields.

Martin says the old stereotype of science and math being male-only fields is gradually fading away.

“Some fields are better than others, like biology, with female enrollment,” Martin says, “But fields like astronomy, math and physics have much lower numbers. As you go up the academic ladder even into the careers the numbers just get smaller and smaller. So hopefully with these programs we can help women stay in these majors as undergrads and go on to careers in these fields.”

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that jobs in the STEM fields will grow at twice the rate of other fields in the coming years.

IU Physicists Win $5.4 Million Grant To Study Subatomic Particles

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An Indiana University team of physicists has won a three year, $5.4 million National Science Foundation award to continue its study of the inner workings of the atom’s nucleus.

The members of the team, several dozen strong, are affiliated with IU’s Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter.

IU physicists have already helped researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory study how minute particles called gluons contribute to the angular momentum of protons.

With this new grant, the IU team will continue to help the effort to learn about the composition and movement of the most elementary particles known to humankind.

Gluons hold quarks together in an atom’s proton. Quarks and gluons are among the smallest things particle physicists have identified. Gluons are so tiny that they are considered massless, actually measured in the billionths of a millimeter.

The IU team also will aid researchers at Fermilab in the search for new types of neutrinos, which are subatomic particles created by nuclear reactions in the sun.

Study of these potential new neutrinos may well affect cosmologist’s estimate of the expansion rate of the early universe.

The IU team includes physics department members Will Jacobs, Lisa Kaufman, Chen-yu Liu, Josh Long, Hans-Otto Meyer, Hermann Nann, William Snow, Ed Stephenson, Anselm Vossen, and Scott Wissink, as well as several post doctorates, graduate students, and undergrads.

 

14th Annual “Hoosiers Outrun Cancer” 5k Takes Place Saturday

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The 14th annual Hoosier Outrun Cancer will take place September 29.

The proceeds will go to the Olcott Center for Cancer Education, and towards free services that support the families of those with cancer.

It started in 2000 says Kim Rudolph, special event manager with the Bloomington Hospital Foundation.

“We have a pre-race ceremony where we honor cancer survivors and those passed on from cancer,” Rudolph says, “We also have a kids run and a lot of other kids’ activities.”

The 5k course goes around the IU Campus and begins and ends at Indiana Memorial Stadium.

Rudolph says she hopes this event will bring awareness to cancer, the number of individuals who are affected by the disease, and the services provided through the Bloomington Hospital foundation.

“The wonderful thing is that we have a center here in town that can help guide anyone going through cancer with treatment,” Rudolph says, “They provide support through the entire treatment process. We’re very fortunate to have a facility like that in our community.”

Hoosiers Outrun Cancer takes place this Saturday at the Indiana Memorial Stadium.

The 5k race begins at 10:20 a.m, and the walk begins at 10:30 am. Late registration takes place tomorrow at the stadium, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m, and on Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.

Childs Elementary School in Bloomington received the honor of a Nation Blue Ribbon School

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The U.S. Department of Education has designated Childs Elementary School in Bloomington a National Blue Ribbon School. The K through six school also received the Blue Ribbon in 2007, an honor awarded every five years. The designation is given to public and private schools of all grades, where students perform at high levels or where significant improvements have been made.

Beverly Smith, Director of School and Community Services at Monroe County Community School Corporation, explains:” It is a remarkable honer to be named a National Blue Ribbon School from U.S. Department of Education. It really is a honoring of the work that goes on at the school and throughout the corporation. It recognizes instruction as well as all layers of achievement and what it takes to help student succeed.”

Childs Elementary School has received a grade ‘A’ from the state of Indiana three years in a row. Twelve schools statewide were given the Blue Ribbon distinction this year.

Ms. Smith believes it is very important for Monroe County schools again to recognize the caliber of instruction and work that goes on within their district. It is wonderful that one school has receive the Blue Ribbon Notification, however they wish to have all of their schools with this honor.

Childs Elementary School is one of two hundred and eighty-six schools nationwide that were recognized as National Blue Ribbon Schools.

App to Pay New Parking Meters

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The Bloomington Board of Public Works approved a contract September 24th for a mobile app that drivers can use to pay the new parking meters. The app is offered by the company Park Mobile.

Amanda Feuquay, with the Public Works Department, said the app can be used to start, stop or extend a parking session using a phone, a computer or a 1-800 number. She said some businesses might also use the app for their customers.

“If I walk into a merchant, and they’ve decided they want to pay for my parking that evening, or that day, they can call park mobile. All they need is my name, my license plate number. And they can pay for my parking session while I am there. They can also order validation codes for their customers to use. And that can be anywhere, from 15 minutes to on-going 14 hours when the meters are alive.”

The company doesn’t charge the city to offer the service, but it does charge a fee to anyone that uses the app. Users will have to sign up with the company, and regular account holders will pay normal parking fees plus a cost of 50 cents for each transaction.

Feuquay said there are ways to reduce that cost with other types of accounts. Board President Charlotte Zietlow asked how the public might react to the costs.

“This is just another option we can offer. It goes hand to hand with what we currently offer. In our research, we found that it dose have really good feedback for many users. So, I think it will be a good option for the city to offer. And Indianapolis is the closest one to us. ”

The city administration frequently mentioned the parking meter app when it sought approval to install the meters earlier this year. Officials including Public Works Department Director Susie Johnson said it would be easy to pay the meters from, for instance, inside a restaurant. Board member James McNamara asked if anything had changed about that arrangement.

“The notion of you are at the restaurant, the dinner is running late. You feed two hours and you have a great time. So, you don’t want a ticket, and you want to increase the parking time. So, this would be an app on a smart phone, you would punch and enter your license plate number. You would first have to download the app and register for it. Once you have the application installed and your payment information is in there. You can start, stop,extend any parking session.”

Feuquay said the app should be available for use by the public in four to six weeks.

 

Daily Local News – September 25, 2013

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The Bloomington Board of Public Works approved a contract September 24th for a mobile app that drivers can use to pay the new parking meters; The U.S. Department of Education has designated Childs Elementary School in Bloomington a National Blue Ribbon School; The prospect of a new charter school in Bloomington was discussed last Tuesday, at a meeting of the Monroe County School Corporation’s Board of Trustees; The Monroe County Public Library’s Board of Trustees gave approval September 18th to solicit bids for a third stage of renovations at the Library; The Bloomington Board of Parks Commissioners approved a new social media policy yesterday for the Parks and Recreation Department; October is national Adopt-A-Dog month, and the Bloomington Animal Shelter is helping to make dog adoption easier than before.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE
Scams are on the rise, and here’s a headsup on two kinds of really dangerous fake emails that have been hitting US recently. Sending your friends a cool link via email is no longer a good idea.

CREDITS
Anchors; Cathi Norton, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by Casey Kuhn,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services
Bloomington Beware is produced by Richard Fish
Our engineer is Jim Lang
Editor is Drew Daudelin
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Mother’s Hubbard’s Cupboard Expands Services To Community In Larger Facility

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A local food charity has been able to significantly expand its services and programs for people since its movement into a new facility.

In June of this year, Mother’s Hubbard’s Cupboard opened its doors at 1100 West Allen Street.

The new facility plus an increase in food available for distribution and increased staff have allowed more hours of service to clients from 10 hours a week to 31 hours a week.

Mary Beth Harris is the Director of Development for Mother Hubbard’s and she says the organization has jumped from 9,000 bags of groceries a month to over 13,000 bags a month.

“We have been working closely with the Hoosier Health Foodbank, who is our main supplier of food,” Harris says, “We work with them to ensure the supply of food is keeping up with demand.”

The new facility also has teaching kitchen and classroom, which has allowed Mother Hubbard’s to expand its Nutrition Education Program.

Nutrition staff, interns, and volunteers have hosted 37 recipe sample tables, more than tripling the number of opportunities patrons have to sample healthy and affordable recipes using items available in the pantry.

They have also hosted nine nutrition workshops including canning, jamming, and fermentation classes.

Mother Hubbard’s also operates a Garden Education program.

They have planted and begun tending a demonstration garden, which has produced its first harvest of tomatoes, basil, eggplant, arugula, and cucumbers for the pantry.

We asked how her organization has managed to fund the expansion of the food distribution system and these and other programs it provides.

Harris says they launched the Nourishing Community: Growing Possibilities eight months ago with the goal of $325,000 and they are already 85 percent of that goal. They hope to use that money to renovate their new facility, buy more tools and equipment as well as help manage a three year transition period with an increase in services and operating cost.

“We expected to increase about 25 percent and we are really seeing over and above what we anticipated by moving into the larger facility,” Harris says.

Listeners who are interested in finding out about volunteer opportunities with Mother’s Hubbard’s Cupboard can go online to: www.mhcfoodpantry.org/events.

Food donations, include produce from home gardens, is accepted Monday-Friday 11am-6pm at 1100 West Allen Street in Bloomington.

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