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Literary works banned by those who fear the power of the pen
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Books Unbound – Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Part 5

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James Joyce was a pioneering writer of modernist fiction and poetry, known for his innovative prose style and complex wordplay. Born in 1882 in Dublin, Joyce left Ireland at the age of twenty to study in Paris. Within months, he started his first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Published in 1914, A Portrait established Joyce as both an experimental stylist and a pusher of boundaries who questioned religious and nationalist orthodoxy.

A Portrait was received as a bold achievement by most of Joyce’s literary peers, but some critics dismissed its realism as a dirty obsession with sex and sewage. These controversies were soon eclipsed by Joyce’s monumental Ulysses. Today regarded as the definitive modernist novel in English, Ulysses was officially banned as obscene in both Britain and the United States, earning Joyce a perennial place among literary masters whose works were suppressed.

Books Unbound – Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Part 4

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James Joyce was a pioneering writer of modernist fiction and poetry, known for his innovative prose style and complex wordplay. Born in 1882 in Dublin, Joyce left Ireland at the age of twenty to study in Paris. Within months, he started his first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Published in 1914, A Portrait established Joyce as both an experimental stylist and a pusher of boundaries who questioned religious and nationalist orthodoxy.

A Portrait was received as a bold achievement by most of Joyce’s literary peers, but some critics dismissed its realism as a dirty obsession with sex and sewage. These controversies were soon eclipsed by Joyce’s monumental Ulysses. Today regarded as the definitive modernist novel in English, Ulysses was officially banned as obscene in both Britain and the United States, earning Joyce a perennial place among literary masters whose works were suppressed.

Books Unbound – Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Part 3

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James Joyce was a pioneering writer of modernist fiction and poetry, known for his innovative prose style and complex wordplay. Born in 1882 in Dublin, Joyce left Ireland at the age of twenty to study in Paris. Within months, he started his first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Published in 1914, A Portrait established Joyce as both an experimental stylist and a pusher of boundaries who questioned religious and nationalist orthodoxy.

A Portrait was received as a bold achievement by most of Joyce’s literary peers, but some critics dismissed its realism as a dirty obsession with sex and sewage. These controversies were soon eclipsed by Joyce’s monumental Ulysses. Today regarded as the definitive modernist novel in English, Ulysses was officially banned as obscene in both Britain and the United States, earning Joyce a perennial place among literary masters whose works were suppressed.

Books Unbound – Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Part 2

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James Joyce was a pioneering writer of modernist fiction and poetry, known for his innovative prose style and complex wordplay. Born in 1882 in Dublin, Joyce left Ireland at the age of twenty to study in Paris. Within months, he started his first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Published in 1914, A Portrait established Joyce as both an experimental stylist and a pusher of boundaries who questioned religious and nationalist orthodoxy.

A Portrait was received as a bold achievement by most of Joyce’s literary peers, but some critics dismissed its realism as a dirty obsession with sex and sewage. These controversies were soon eclipsed by Joyce’s monumental Ulysses. Today regarded as the definitive modernist novel in English, Ulysses was officially banned as obscene in both Britain and the United States, earning Joyce a perennial place among literary masters whose works were suppressed.

Books Unbound – Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Part 1

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James Joyce was a pioneering writer of modernist fiction and poetry, known for his innovative prose style and complex wordplay. Born in 1882 in Dublin, Joyce left Ireland at the age of twenty to study in Paris. Within months, he started his first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Published in 1914, A Portrait established Joyce as both an experimental stylist and a pusher of boundaries who questioned religious and nationalist orthodoxy.

A Portrait was received as a bold achievement by most of Joyce’s literary peers, but some critics dismissed its realism as a dirty obsession with sex and sewage. These controversies were soon eclipsed by Joyce’s monumental Ulysses. Today regarded as the definitive modernist novel in English, Ulysses was officially banned as obscene in both Britain and the United States, earning Joyce a perennial place among literary masters whose works were suppressed.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 28

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 27

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 26

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 25

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 24

Play

Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

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